AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The bass drum have impact, and you can feel it in your chest at high listening volumes. However, the long bass guitar notes sounds boomy and lacks the feeling that bass drum delivers. They hurts ears... Yet, they make everything vibrate in my small room. Why can't I feel them on my stomach if they have the power to vibrate my whole room?


I have 12" 3-way speakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,637 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1 /forum/post/20869466


Move speakers around. Try closer/further from the wall. I think the problem is with location. There are standing waves in the room. And you probably sit in the null point.

Was thinking the same thing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1 /forum/post/20869466


Move speakers around. Try closer/further from the wall. I think the problem is with location. There are standing waves in the room. And you probably sit in the null point.

I can't hear difference in sound, when placing the further or closer to the wall. However, the bass have most impact at the corners next to them.


Could this issue be solved with multiband EQ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,251 Posts
...to go further (which is probably a can 'o worms).


What are make/model numbers of your speakers and receiver (or amp and pre/pro)?

What are the dimensions of your listening room?

Where is your listening position relative to the speakers?

... and that's just for "starters".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,851 Posts
Who knows



First, you must make sure the speakers are operating in phase. Sit equidistant, only hook up one speaker with some thumping bass line. Then, add the second speaker and listen to assure they are additive.


Second, SBIR is an issue that can easily can destructive interference from the adjacent walls, typically the wall behind your speaker. This energy comes off the wall and can easily be destructive acoustically and null some energy in the power, or impact range of the bass. So experiment with placement away from wall, or back toward the wall, just experiment.


Listening position, experiment with your seated position, perhaps room acoustics is creating modal issues, again destructively nulling LF energy at the LP. Moving backward toward the rear wall may improve bass,...at the expense of other issues, however,...again, ...just experiment



This is likely what's going on; Poor response in the time domain. Oftentimes, excessive ringing, or LF energy sustaining too long, and this provides for ill defined bass. Bass traps are one remedy, however there are others. Poor response in the time domain is prevalent in many systems.


Read this , it's very good and relevant.

Here is a solid article about bass traps from Ethan Winer,...an AVS contributor.



I think you may find Floyd Tooles Sound Reproduction book interesting, it's superb. Everything regarding loudspeakers, and the home is within.




Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman /forum/post/20871986


...to go further (which is probably a can 'o worms).


What are make/model numbers of your speakers and receiver (or amp and pre/pro)?

What are the dimensions of your listening room?

Where is your listening position relative to the speakers?

... and that's just for "starters".

Cerwin-vega XLS-12

Onkyo TX-NR509

Room size: 5m x 3,5m (Sloped ceiling, speakers back edges touches it)

Listening position: 2m staright from speakers, at the middle of the room, next to bookshelf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by RCbridge /forum/post/20873326


What is ceiling height min and max?

Room dimensions: 5m x 3.5m


Sloped ceiling dimensions:

Max: 2.15 m (width 33% of the whole area)

Min: 0.7m (width 33% of the whole area on the both sides)


Speakers are as close to the wall as possible (50cm), under the sloped ceiling.

Speaker's height is 90cm, so there is (0.5m x 0.2m) / 2 + 0.7m x 0.5m area behind the speaker, and the speakers are 1.1m apart, so the space behind the speakers is: [(0.5m x 0.2m) / 2 + 0.7m x 0.5m] x 1.1m = 0.44 square meter. That is, because the speakers are between side-wall and the PC-table. So they fit just tightly in that hole. And there's small glass-table/TV between the speakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
You have a very unusually shaped room, however it is what you have.

If you are only using 2 speakers you can try an audio eq.

The other options are speaker placement and room treatment.

Sorry I don't know enough about room treatment to help you hopfully someone in this conversation does.


Good luck with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Oh, and I forgot to mention, that my room is at upstairs. The floor have wooden structure.


I ask this question here, because it's relevant:


On Audyssey 2EQ measurement, the microphone must be placed at ear level.

It means the ear level at listening position (sat down), I presume?

And secondly, the 2EQ makes measurement of three listening places, and I listen just from one place, so do I make every measurement from that same place?


And one more: could I pre-EQ the music file on computer, and that way simulate real EQ and get the idea how it works?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts

Quote:
Oh, and I forgot to mention, that my room is at upstairs. The floor have wooden structure

What does it feel like downstairs?

Perform your measurments from your main listening position.

Laslty regardless of what the EQ says, tweak for the best sound to your ears!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
I believe you are expecting too much. The bass drum is a short high impact burst that you feel in the gut/chest, while a bass guitar has a very different sound characteristic, i.e. it's a continuing vibration, as your room tells you already. You won't feel it in the gut. No equalizer will change that. Get a few CD's with contra bass music or Jeff Beck Live at Ronnie Scotts http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...62Y5JAX02Q4KM7

which is well recorded with drums and bass guitar and move your speakers a bit forward and put some blankets/heavy curtain material at the wall behind the loudspeakers and the first reflection point on the right wall, put the loudspeakers on spikes or bricks and see that you find a compromise between chest hitting and everything vibrating. If everything vibrates, you play too loud. In your small room with only two loudspeakers, you can't expect too much. Sorry to bring the bad news.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top