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Greetings,


I am installing 7 pairs of 8" Speaker Craft speakers in my ceilings. These speakers need a hole cut-out diameter of 9-3/4". What sort of tool(s) should I purchase in order to make this job easy? I found a recessed hole cutter at Home Depot, but the diameter only goes up to 7 inches.


Thanks for your suggestions.


Shawn
 

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What materials are you cutting? The usual solution is a trammel arm and cutting tool such as a jig saw, router or zip tool. Purpose built tools like http://www.eastwoodco.com/email/defa...KW=HOLE,CUTTER are really for production work. A keyhole saw may be all you need for drywall.
 

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I installed a bunch of speakers in my ceiling....I found that using a drill with a door lock-type cutter to start the hole was the best....to save time on cutting, I actually used the door-lock cutter a couple of times to create a few holes in the area that I was trying to cut out....and then used an other hand saw to get close to the pencil marks that I drew with the template...


There should be a template that comes with the speakers....Just make sure that you don't cut through the wires, if they have been pre-wired in the ceilings....and then just use a key-hole type saw to saw out the dimensions....it is really easy....and hard to screw up, since the speaker will have a cover that will cover up the opening by at least a half inch or so...


If they are round....it is a piece of cake.....


If they are rectangular....you have to make extra sure that they are straight and don't look crooked when you are done...


Good Luck!!!
 

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That type of scoring tool is most useful for making a hole in a sheet before putting it up so that both sides can be scored. For already installed drywall, a saw works better. A Rotozip tool with a circle cutting attachment is best for dedicated power tools. A simple keyhole saw will do the job well and easily. Drywall is very easy to cut.
 

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I just finished putting 5 recessed lights in the ceiling drywall with a rotary tool and circle cutting attachment. It worked OK but was kind of messy and wasn't as easy as I thought it would be working over my head.


Check out the recessed lighting area of Home depot or Lowes. If I had to do it again I would just spring for the hole saw attachment that goes on a drill. I think it would make a cleaner and easier hole when working over your head. I don't know if they come in a size as large as you need but they might since they had several there for under $50.
 

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Roto zips or dremal is the best way IMO to cut drywall when you need to be able to make various size holes.


For dust free cutting with the roto zip, you can tape the end of a shop vac hose to the roto. Keep the end close to the cutter and clean your filter on the vac often. Drywall dust plugs filters quick.


If you don't have a roto zip with circle cutter, then you can get one usually under 90 dollars, or you could rent one from an equipment renter for less than 20 dollars.


Good luck
 

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Just a word of caution on the roto zip. Continuous use in a vertical position can fry your bearings. Be sure to blow the dust off after every cut. It gets inside the unit.


Some lessons you learn too late in life. Like after 30 recessed lights.
 

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What I found works the best is a sidways cutting bit for your drill, they've been around for years and work the same way as the rotozip (but you don't need to buy the extra tool. Another tip is to use a shallow icecream container (or swipe a tupperware bowl from the cabinet when the wife isn't looking) and jab your bit directly through the center, this way it will collect all the dust and debris the would otherwise fall in your face and into the drill assembly.
 
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