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Discussion Starter #1
Serious newby who's aching to enter the HD world. Reading all these posts, though, it's beginning to look complicated.


I read somewhere the following basic steps for calibrating a new set:


- Immediately OOTB, adjust the Brightness because its set for Showroom viewing.


- Let it "burn in" for a couple weeks. What the heck is that? After something like 40 or 80 hours (not sure which) you can do the end-user adjustments. From reading your posts, looks like maybe there's a disk that comes with it?


- after a month or so (?) you need to have an ISF certified professional finish the job.


Is that about right? I'd hate to screw it up from the get go, so any advice at all would be seriously appreciated.


Thanks
 

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Coyote Waits
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Quote:
Originally posted by TroyMiami
Serious newby who's aching to enter the HD world. Reading all these posts, though, it's beginning to look complicated.
Yes it is complicated. There are several kinds of HD ready or full HD (with OTA tuner built in) TV technologies.


You seem to be talking about CRT based RPTV sets which are based on analog technology and CRT tubes. They have been around in one form or another for a long time.



There are also DLP, LCD, and LCoS RPTV sets. This group is digital and may be looked at as newer technology.


You probably need to do some more reading and more visits to different TV dealers in order to develop some opinions of your own.


Check out the "Popular" link at the bottom of my message.


Good luck.
 

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Troy in MIA,


Yeh, out of the box adjust the settings in the user menu because those are set to "torch mode". Torch mode is when the settings for your set are turned all the way up just like must of the settings for televisions are in the stores.


I think that you meant break the set in instead of burn-in. With a CRT breaking in the set means allowing the crts in the television to settle into place. This normally happens after 3 to 4 weeks of usage. Once the crts have settled you or an ISFer can go into the service menu and make adjusts to convergence or color. Whether you get a DLP, LCD, LCOS or CRT you can choose to have it calibrated by a ISFer or not. Some people like to have that done and others live without it. It all depends on how your set looks to you. There are many threads in this forum about making adjustments in the service menu, but only do so if you have a *thorough* understanding of the adjustments you will make. I have a rpcrt and I made convergence adjustments in the service menu but only after I took a couple of days to read and understand how to make the adjustments for better picture quality.


The disk(s) you see people refer do not come with the sets. There are two disks: Avia and Digital Video Essentials. They can be purchased from Amazon.com or others e-tailers that I am not aware of. Make sure you get the NTSC version. The disks are used by people to adjust the controls in the user menu (i.e. color, brightness, contrast, sharpness) to settings that are more appropriate for your set. The day I bought my set home I took my Video Essential disk and made the adjustments. You will notice right away how different the colors and everything else looks when you make those adjustments.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your input guys. Looks like I'm in way over my head. Can anyone suggest a place to research just exacly what I want to be looking for, "whether you get a DLP, LCD, LCOS or CRT"?


A source that covers the basics of HDTV. Like do I buy one with a built in Tuner, or use Comcast's boxes (provided they start servicing Miami)? Is there a table that would give the ideal size screen versus the distance away the couches and chairs are? Basic stuff like that?


Thanks again for your patience.
 

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There is alot of info on this board to wade through but I will provide some links that will help.


1. Deciding whether to get a tv with a tuner or buy a separate one depends on a number of factors. From what I have read and you can prolly find more info about this in the hardware forum, cable and sat recievers will not work with tuners built into a set because of the way that each technology encrypts the signal. The new "open cable" standards for newer tvs with built in tuners should correct the problem but I don't know if any of those sets are available yet. If you buy a set now with a built in tuner you can use it to recieve signals from an ota (over the air) antenna.


As far as a table for seating distance, everyone uses a different formula. In the link below Arun provides a list of seating distances that THX recommends. Seating Distance recommendations . Look halfway down this page until you find his post.


This thread will provide you with information for the dlp DLP sets . There are numerous threads on the lcd sets based on brand. The Hitachi owners have a thread that they update daily so you should be able to find that easily. The Sony owners also have a thread. Thread is a LCOS thread for owners of the Philips Lcos set. Use the search function by typing in Lcos and you should find it. Remember that Philips is introducing a new Lcos set this year. When you read the Philips lcos thread you will see that people have had issue with the previous models.


There isn't a particular thread for crt seeing as though there are a number of manufacturers who create them. You will see different threads for Mitsubishi, Panasonic, Hitachi, Toshiba and Sony crts. Do a search and you will find them. Some of the threads on DLP and LCD will not give you an objective view of the sets. Try to read about Arun Gupta's guide to DLP. It is in his signature at the bottom of his posts. If you want to read objective opinions about LCD go to the Digital Projector $5,000+ forum and see what you can find about the technology. There is some useful LCD info in this thread LCD .
 

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Coyote Waits
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Quote:
Originally posted by TroyMiami
Like do I buy one with a built in Tuner, or use Comcast's boxes (provided they start servicing Miami)?
The built in tuners work like SD TV sets before there was cable. You need an external or set top HD antenna (regular UHF) to pick up over the air (OTA) station. Cable companies like Comcast may provide some HD channels but so far they haven't been providing CBS, NBC, ABC or PBS that I know about.


If you subscribe to DirecTV instead of cable you get a STB that can receive both the DirecTV signal and OTA stations. In that case a built in tuner would be a duplication. That the same kind of duplication you get with a VHS and a SD TV. They both have the same type tuner but a lot of the VHS tuners have been better than the built in versions.


Take your time. :)
 
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