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Rear Projection Televisions (RPTVs): These televisions are the standard of big screens today. Often, different technology like LCD is combined with RPTV's base technology - creating a hybrid. But when RPTV is referred to, the basic stand-alone technology is what is in reference.


How it works:They work just like their name says, by projecting the video image on the inside of the screen, after shooting it through a series of lenses and mirrors to enlarge it.


Pros: CRT has the best reproduction of color. Projection is the standard for big screen television, and holds the mainstream of the market. The biggest reason being it's low price - it is significantly lower than any other format out there today. And although other technologies are rising on it's heels fast, RPTVs generally boast the largest screen sizes. Since it is the most mature technology today, it is the most reliable format and has the most established service support network.


Cons: Projection TV's are not only big screen TV's because of their large visible display, but they are also BIG televisions - literally. They have the heaviest and largest relative dimensions of any of the other television formats. And pure projection televisions are still subject to on screen "after-images" and "burn-ins"

Liquid Crystal or Silicon (LCoS) and Digital Light Amplification (D-ILA):These sets have been produced in both three chip and single chip designs. Models that use the three-chip design offer higher resolutions and levels of brightness. Some resolutions are even as high as a full 1080p (1920x1080 pixel) potential. However with the fine tuning of this technology, experts predict the best is yet to come, as this technology has yet to be perfected.


How it Works: These displays are powered by semi-conductor chips that are basically a mix between LCD and silicon processors. These sets contain a silicon back plate, with a highly reflective aluminum, pixilated, top layer that controls the display of the liquid crystals. Also, some single chip designs even use synchronized prism arrays, to produce correct color saturation. But this technology gives rear and front projection technology a much smaller footprint, since there is no need for large CRT tubes that would need to be properly converged as well.


Pros: High quality with a very small footprint. Best color saturation and smoothest image display. If the current trend holds in terms of its price comparable to other micro-devices such as LCD and DLP (as witnessed in JVC's D-ILA), then LCoS will and should dominate micro-device rear projection based on its inherently superior picture performance.


Cons: None if chip production yield is sufficient to put LCoS within the "striking" distance from other micro devices.

Digital Light Processing (DLP): One of the most promising and favored alternatives to traditional CRT, Digital Light Processing has a very optimistic future if the three chip DLP can be mass produced.


How it Works: This format relies on a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), which is much like a light switch. Most DLP sets use single DMD designs. These rectangular chips contain over one million hinged microscopic mirrors, each corresponding to one pixel in the sets resolution. A white light then passes through a filter color wheel, creating red, green, and blue light to be shone sequentially on the surface of the DMD chip.


Pros:Very impressive low gray scale performance, very bright.


Cons:Its one chip design is flawed. Three prime colors are not simultaneously present. A white element of light has to be added to increase the light output to a desirable level. This results in a compromise in color accuracy: Although bright, its colors look shallow and pale especially on non-HD sources such as DVD.

Organic LEDs (OLEDs): These are quite possibly the most eagerly anticipated new generation TV technology since plasma televisions. Most of the OLED development has been used in the automotive industry, but manufacturers view the technology in the long term to be able to revolutionize TV, and bring new exciting performance and convenience to the table.


How it Works: Ironically enough, OLED is a catch all term for a wide variety of different somewhat similar technologies with ranging performance. But at its core, it’s a thin flexible display created by putting organic film between two conductors. When an electric current is added to the mix, it emits a bright light.


Pros: These displays promise wide 160 degree viewing angles, and won’t require backlighting like LCD sets. They also consume very little electricity, and require little power to operate. In the future, these sets promise to offer improved performance in just about every aspect: brightness, response time, and even broader operating conditions and durability than other new generation sets. There’s even optimistic possibility of creating plastic thin displays that can be rolled up much like a window blind when not in use.


Cons: The technology has been in development for many years, this alternative is still in the making.
 

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Wheres the LCD write-up?
 

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You also left out poor blacks for cons of D-ILA.
 

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Rear Projection Televisions (RPTVs): These televisions are the standard of big screens today. Often, different technology like LCD is combined with RPTV's base technology - creating a hybrid. But when RPTV is referred to, the basic stand-alone technology is what is in reference.


How it works:They work just like their name says, by projecting the video image on the inside of the screen, after shooting it through a series of lenses and mirrors to enlarge it.


Pros: CRT has the best reproduction of color. Projection is the standard for big screen television, and holds the mainstream of the market. The biggest reason being it's low price - it is significantly lower than any other format out there today. And although other technologies are rising on it's heels fast, RPTVs generally boast the largest screen sizes. Since it is the most mature technology today, it is the most reliable format and has the most established service support network.


Cons: Projection TV's are not only big screen TV's because of their large visible display, but they are also BIG televisions - literally. They have the heaviest and largest relative dimensions of any of the other television formats. And pure projection televisions are still subject to on screen "after-images" and "burn-ins"

Liquid Crystal or Silicon (LCoS) and Digital Light Amplification (D-ILA):These sets have been produced in both three chip and single chip designs. Models that use the three-chip design offer higher resolutions and levels of brightness. Some resolutions are even as high as a full 1080p (1920x1080 pixel) potential. However with the fine tuning of this technology, experts predict the best is yet to come, as this technology has yet to be perfected.


How it Works: These displays are powered by semi-conductor chips that are basically a mix between LCD and silicon processors. These sets contain a silicon back plate, with a highly reflective aluminum, pixilated, top layer that controls the display of the liquid crystals. Also, some single chip designs even use synchronized prism arrays, to produce correct color saturation. But this technology gives rear and front projection technology a much smaller footprint, since there is no need for large CRT tubes that would need to be properly converged as well.


Pros: High quality with a very small footprint. Best color saturation and smoothest image display. If the current trend holds in terms of its price comparable to other micro-devices such as LCD and DLP (as witnessed in JVC's D-ILA), then LCoS will and should dominate micro-device rear projection based on its inherently superior picture performance.


Cons: None for Sony SXRD but the JVC D-ILA SUFFERS FROM EXTREMELY POOR BLACK LEVELS AND ULTRA LOW CONTRAST BUT ARE SUPER BRIGHT WHICH MAKES THEM GREAT FOR WATCHING SPORTS PROGRAMS DURING THE DAY. BUT BE PREPARED FOR EXTREMEMLY MUDDY PICTURES WHEN WATCHING MOVIES WITH DARK CONTENT.

Digital Light Processing (DLP): One of the most promising and favored alternatives to traditional CRT, Digital Light Processing has a very optimistic future if the three chip DLP can be mass produced.


How it Works: This format relies on a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), which is much like a light switch. Most DLP sets use single DMD designs. These rectangular chips contain over one million hinged microscopic mirrors, each corresponding to one pixel in the sets resolution. A white light then passes through a filter color wheel, creating red, green, and blue light to be shone sequentially on the surface of the DMD chip.


Pros:Very impressive low gray scale performance, very bright.


Cons:Its one chip design is flawed. Three prime colors are not simultaneously present. A white element of light has to be added to increase the light output to a desirable level. This results in a compromise in color accuracy: Although bright, its colors look shallow and pale especially on non-HD sources such as DVD. THE LATEST 1080P DLPs HAVE PRODUCED SOME THE MOST VIBRANT COLORS ON A MICRODISPLAY EVER WITH AWESOME BLACK LEVELS AND ULTRA HIGH CONTRAST MAKING THESE THE BEST MICRODISPAYS TO DATE FOR FILM.

LCD Projection These sets perform much like the JVC D-ILA described at the beginning of this post but with slightly sharper pictures at the expense of some SDE. The newest 3LCD Sony sets have eliminated the BL and CR problem that D-ILA has today and that older LCD Projection TVs had.

Organic LEDs (OLEDs): These are quite possibly the most eagerly anticipated new generation TV technology since plasma televisions. Most of the OLED development has been used in the automotive industry, but manufacturers view the technology in the long term to be able to revolutionize TV, and bring new exciting performance and convenience to the table.


How it Works: Ironically enough, OLED is a catch all term for a wide variety of different somewhat similar technologies with ranging performance. But at its core, it’s a thin flexible display created by putting organic film between two conductors. When an electric current is added to the mix, it emits a bright light.


Pros: These displays promise wide 160 degree viewing angles, and won’t require backlighting like LCD sets. They also consume very little electricity, and require little power to operate. In the future, these sets promise to offer improved performance in just about every aspect: brightness, response time, and even broader operating conditions and durability than other new generation sets. There’s even optimistic possibility of creating plastic thin displays that can be rolled up much like a window blind when not in use.


Cons: The technology has been in development for many years, this alternative is still in the making.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillP
You also left out poor blacks for cons of D-ILA.
I got that in above :)
 
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