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I am all set for HD except for the TV. I have a DISH 6000 w/ota module and currently watch HD on my computer monitor (looks awesome). I've been looking at lots and lots of RPTVs and direct view TVs for my HD viewing option and have observed this:


RPTVs seem to have a "hot spot" that moves around with the viewing angle. Is this normal, or are the sets I'm looking at setup too bright? I can't see myself sitting perfectly still in one spot to be in the correct viewing angle all the time.


It looks to me that there is a definite "bright" band running across the screen with the top and bottom edges a bit darker than this middle band.


I have looked at a lot of models and price ranges and they all seem to do this. Is a properly calibrated set better? How do you live with this viewing restriction?


No flames please, I've never owned an RPTV and I have searched this forum and can't find a topic relating to this.


Thanks for your help and educational repsonses.


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"I want my HDTV Set!"
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Marissadad:
RPTVs seem to have a "hot spot" that moves around with the viewing angle. Is this normal, or are the sets I'm looking at setup too bright? I can't see myself sitting perfectly still in one spot to be in the correct viewing angle all the time.
Yep, this is pretty much normal, though the range of the "hot spot" does vary from model to model. The reason is that the CRTs that project the picture aren't all that bright, so the manufacturers use a lenticular screen that focuses the light at the expected viewing position, making the picture brighter than it would otherwise be.


This is really what's keeping me from buying an HDTV at the moment. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/frown.gif


The so-called "bulb" RPTVs, which use LCD, DLP, or LCOS technologies, don't suffer from this problem, because the projection systems are much brighter. The downside is that they have a maximum "native" resolution (most around 1366x768), and are expensive ($8000+). Sony has a few models in the $2000 range, but they're only about 1000x480.


Oh, and you have to change a $200-$300 bulb every couple thousand hours.


Alex
 

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There "lenticular" screen at the front of an RPTV spreads the light out across a wide horizontal arc. This means that you can move a considerable horizontal distance and not see much difference in the brightness, but moving even a relatively short vertical distance will make an obvious difference.


If you're not at the correct vertical height, then the "hot spot" will seem exaggerated when you move from side to side. An RPTV should be installed so that the screen is level with your eyes when they're in the position you usually watch the TV from (typically sitting in a couch or on a chair). This means the TV will not look as good if you view it while standing.
 

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All RPTV owners manuals I've had show both the horizontal and vertical best viewing angle areas- usually with corresponding distances in feet. The farther one is away the higher ones eyes can be. Most people inspecting RPTVs in a store are too close.


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I've begun to check at stores which manufacturer's screens have a wider acceptable angle of view than others. I haven't reached any conclusions yet.


Anyone have an opinion on this?
 
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