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Im new to home theatering and i was just wondering how i could run wires in wall. OR just at least make it look nice and simple rather than having wires hanging on the wall or just chilling on the ground. especially for rear channels.


greatly appreciated!!!
 

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Hi there....I'm relatively new to all this too, but I just finished running some wires. Basically, I pulled speaker wires up from a hole I cut in the wall. Placed a switch box in the wall so I could plate it later. Ran the wires through the attic. The hard part was coming back down the other wall. I had to cut about 5 rectangular holes for each wire I was dropping down the wall. I had some horizontal beams that I could not drill through from the attic, so I drilled the first hole in the beam over the wall, dropped some chain down and then cut my smaller holes in the wall to allow me to drill through the horizontal beam and fish the chain down from the attic. Probably not the neatest solution, but everytime I cut a hole in the wall I found that I was staring at about 1.5 ft of 2x4s stack on top of each other or a big cluster of electrical wires. Those are the reasons I had to cut so many holes. Basically, I was looking for a clear spot to drill through the horizontal beam (between the two studs) and still be able to get to the chain.


I finally got my wires run, and then made a trip to home depot to pick up some drywall tape and joint compound to patch up the mess I made. Now you can't even tell I had my walls all cut up and I have rear speakers mounted neatly on the wall!


If you've got the time to spare, and aren't afraid of fixing what you destroy then you shouldn't have a problem getting wires run. Good Luck!
 

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That's a rather broad question, but the answer is --- "with care".


When fishing cables through the walls, you have to make sure of a couple key concerns.
  • Your cable ratings.
  • Where the electrical lines are.


Cables have to be rated for in-wall use to be allowed to be placed in walls. Zip wire and most patch cables are not rated for in wall use. And whenever you're cutting, drilling, etc. in the wall it helps to know where your electrical lines are so you don't find out by accident.
 

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In addition to what was already mentioned, make sure that in any case, if any sort of signal wire (video, audio, network, phone... anything) should never run near an electrical wire unless they're not coplanar (IOW, perpendicular on either of the other 2 axes)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonoMan
In addition to what was already mentioned, make sure that in any case, if any sort of signal wire (video, audio, network, phone... anything) should never run near an electrical wire unless they're not coplanar (IOW, perpendicular on either of the other 2 axes)
lol @ coplanar. Just couldn't see yourself using such a common word as parallel, huh?
 

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parallel is not the only way it's coplanar ;) It's the worst angle (0 degrees). But even 89 degrees off will still exhibit slight magnetic coupling... (though at 89 degrees, it's pretty negligible)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonoMan
parallel is not the only way it's coplanar ;) It's the worst angle (0 degrees). But even 89 degrees off will still exhibit slight magnetic coupling... (though at 89 degrees, it's pretty negligible)
OK, own up, you loved your Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerances classes back in Engineering School...didn't you. You did, don't like, I've got proof.
 

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