AVS Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My living room is the room in which I have all my a/v equipment. I recently installed in-wall speakers, with little effort.


I now want to install in-ceilings for my surrounds. They are pretty much my only option right now, because the couch does not back up against a wall (which precludes running wire along the baseboards) nor do we have carpet (can't run the wire under it). Wireless won't work, because I wouldn't be able to get the speakers close enough to a power source. I should also mention I live in a condo.


My problem is, from the ideal mounting location to the TV, the ceiling joists run parallel to the wall
Thus I can't run in between two joists to get to the wall. The couch is about 12 ft from the wall, so there are probably about 4-5 joists in between.


What would be the easiest method of running the wire? Since this is a relatively new condo (few years old), is it possible there are independent ceiling joists? If so, is it possible that there is enough space above the joists to run the wire over them?


If not, is my only option to cut holes at each joist and drill through? IF this is the only way, what are my options are far as cutting the holes at each joist? I'm looking to minimize the number of holes I cut while still being able to drill through the joists and what not safely (i.e. I don't want to drill blindly through a joist without knowing what's on the other side).


It's been suggested that I cut a large rectangle (maybe about 5" x 10"?) where the long side runs perpendicular to and is centered over the joist so that I expose it. Ideally this would give me a solid piece of drywall that, when I'm finished, I could brace to the joist with a flat screw, thus making patching a bit simpler. Is that a stupid idea? A pipe dream?


Am I missing a much simpler method here?


Thanks,

Justin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,873 Posts
You'll have to cut round holes to place the ceiling speakers anyway. Use those and a flexible drill bit to get through the joists between speakers and to the wall. If you can fish up the wall, you can either open a hole at the ceiling/wall junction, or perhaps run wire inside/behind crown molding so you can poke it up into the ceiling...


You should be able to map out ductwork, etc. beforehand based on placement of vents, plumbing, etc. But in general, drywall repair is not that expensive - it's good to have "a guy" to do patches, as opening things up a lot of the time is much simpler/cheaper than the work required to avoid it...


Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@jaunter: wouldn't I still have to cut holes at each joist? My joists sadly do not run perpendicular to the direction I need to run.


@Big: I thought about running towards the side wall, but then there would be a lot of crown molding to take down. More than 12 ft. And then wouldn't I have to chisel out a channel for the wires? Would that be more/less effort than cutting/patching dry wall?


Thanks,

Justin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,873 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by justinmiller621 /forum/post/20838104


@jautor: wouldn't I still have to cut holes at each joist? My joists sadly do not run perpendicular to the direction I need to run.

Long flexible drill bit - like 3-5' long...


If they don't run perpendicular, you wouldn't be drilling through joists...

Quote:
@Big: I thought about running towards the side wall, but then there would be a lot of crown molding to take down. More than 12 ft. And then wouldn't I have to chisel out a channel for the wires? Would that be more/less effort than cutting/patching dry wall?

Crown molding isn't generally solid. If there's not enough room behind it, you just cut out the top 1" of drywall, which will be covered by the crown when you put it back. Same for accessing the ceiling joist bays from there...


12' isn't a lot to take down - it's probably only 1-2 pieces (not counting corners)


Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
you have crown molding...Well there's your path.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,649 Posts
You might want to do a little research and check out exactly what you have for crown moulding before jumping in. If it is wood, you should have few problems if you use the right tools and are careful. If it is MDF, plastic, or foam, it might be more difficult to do without damaging the material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
They make long drill bits that are made specifically for this. http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053 meant to be used with http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053 The best part... They can serve as fish tape as well. You have to cut 4 to 8 (depending on they path) 4"x6" holes in the wall. Patching these holes (only 2 fill with speakers
) is relatively easy. Just need some drywall patches, some drywall mud, a 6" flexible putty knife (meant for spreading the mud), and some sanding sponges. Cut holes, run wires, patch holes, and then paint.


Crown molding will work for you too (generally there should be enough space to just drop it behind the moulding). Crown moulding angles out, so if it's butt up against the ceiling, pry it off, lay the wires back there, then put it back. Personally, I'd rather cut holes. Especially if you plan to recaulk the moulding. Caulking is much more an artform than fixing drywall. Just my two cents..


With no real knowledge of the process, I recently undertook running wires for many things (speakers, lights, outlets) and while I was quick to ask questions, I found it to be pretty easy. Home depot can help
(I don't work for them, though I felt like an employee as much as I visited that store during this process)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,126 Posts
'Mapping out' HVAC duct runs isn't always easy. There will be things running between joists that you don't expect.


Instead of drilling blindly with a flexibit across several joists, I suggest cutting small holes at each joist cavity, so you know there are no surprises - water pipes, unexpected HVAC ducts (tenant above you?), 110v AC lines.


Most of the time, you'll be OK drilling blindly - but you're rolling the dice. I don't like to take chances, but others do.


If the construction is only a few years old, it will be easy to match paint.


+1, find a good drywall/paint guy, and cut all the holes you want
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree that I'd rather not drill blindly through studs.


My inclination is to cut the holes vs the molding since I know how to patch drywall and I don't know what I'm likely to encounter with the molding.


Is there any validity to my original idea of cutting the drywall at each joist such that it exposes both sides of the joist as well as the joist itself? I figure that way, I can see both sides of the joist AND since I have a solid piece of drywall, it will be easier to patch. I may need to buy a couple paint stirrers or something to brace the drywall to, but I'm willing to do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,382 Posts
I'd suggest that it is easier to cut one long channel out of the drywall in the center of the ceiling. Cut your two holes for the speakers, drill through the joists (where you can now see EVERYTHING and ANYTHING that may be in the way), run the wire to the center channel and down the middle to the equipment. Then you have one BIG patch instead of a bunch of little ones.


Oh, and you haven't said if you have neighbors above you. I don't reckon they'll be too happy with in-ceiling speakers right below their floor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,126 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks all for the active conversation.


I'm quite certain that I have independent ceiling joists so as I understand it, there's a fair amount of space between my ceiling and the floor above. Couple that with the fact that generally, the sound coming from the rear speakers is mostly going to be things like bullets whizzing by and other such sounds, I can't imagine that would cause too much of a problem for my upstairs neighbors. Even when I'm just playing music, I can just play it in stereo.


Am I off base?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,873 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by justinmiller621 /forum/post/20843269


the sound coming from the rear speakers is mostly going to be things like bullets whizzing by and other such sounds, I can't imagine that would cause too much of a problem for my upstairs neighbors.

Right, because unlike music, the random sounds of bullets, thunder, explosions and the like aren't likely to disturb or alarm anyone.



If you proceed, I would recommend that you at least look at sealed enclosure speakers or build backer boxes to contain the in-ceiling speakers...


On the plus side, if the ceiling joists are independent, you should be able to fish the wires above them without drilling (though they may just be staggered, which may make that impractical...


Jeff
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top