AVS Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought 100 feet of (regular) 12g speaker wire and now due to a setup change I need to run about 3 feet through a wall to get to the basement... the remaining 25 - 30 feet will be run along open Joists. Am I ok running a few feet thru the wall, or do I need in-wall wire? I bought the wire thru monprice so returning it is not as simple as going down to best buy... but I'll send it back if I need to...


Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,858 Posts
Per code? Yes. Is it really going to hurt anything? The chances are infinitesimally small that it would. If it were me I'd say screw it and run the wire you have.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
20,735 Posts
Depends what the electrical code is where you are.


But most places follow the NEC, in which case the answer is yes: you need in-wall wire.


Will it actually matter? No not really.


However, I would still strongly recommend it because should for some unforeseen circumstances your house burns down or something, the insurance company may show up and say: this guy ran a bunch of wire not per the NEC and his house burned down, we're not paying.


Monoprice wire is dirt cheap, just get another spool of in-wall.


Or if you want to be really cheap, splice a chunk of in-wall into the run for the part that goes through the wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was thinking the same thing... just splicing in about 5ft of in-wall wire to each run. Would I have any noticeable degradation?...(it's basically an entry level system).


Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
I wouldn't worry about it at all. Use what you got, if you ask me that's better than trying to do a splice job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,691 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxGeek
I wonder if anyone sells wire wrap or sleeving that will turn your regular wire into in wall wire?
I think the in-wall rating (CL2) is related, at least in part, to the materials used in the insulation (maybe something about what happens when it burns?), so you couldn't, for example, just wrap some clear vinyl speaker wire to make it CL2 rated. No kind of wrap could turn unrated wire into CL2-rated wire, so that idea just won't work.


I don't really know the particulars of the CL2 rating, but people generally want rated wire so that they don't risk invalidating their insurance coverage -- so they won't have a problem making a claim on their homeowners insurance in the unfortunate event of a fire. Having the rating is key -- a wire that was functionally equivalent (e.g. has a jacket, or whatever) but with no rating would not be a suitable alternative.


-Max
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
I'm not so sure it would make any difference in the case of a fire. This isn't household wiring that carries the currents and are regulated in the codes, it's speaker wire carrying much lower levels and isn't covered in any code I've needed to consult. CL-2 relates to communications and data cabling, cl-3 relates to industrial communications and data cabling. Neither relates to speaker wire- I don't think it's mentioned in NEC.


I may be wrong but I'd think that the so-called "in-wall" speaker wire has it's sleeve made of material that mousies won't chew or otherwise be degraded while out of sight long term.


Insurance investigators have better things to do than worry over speaker wire, and they generally wouldn't dunn you even if you were running an electrical heater with frayed wiring that caught a short by melting the insulation when you used a 16 guage extension cord from the hall to your bedroom. They just want to adjust your loss. The fire marshall might call you to give you a short lecture for next time unless someone died. Then you'll be consoled instead of lectured.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top