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Hi,

last year, I did a soundproofing job in my master bedroom in my home, hung 2 layers of 5/8 drywall with green glue sandwiched between, attached on IB-1 clips and 25 gauge hat channel.  we had great results for airborne noise.

we had a flood in the house recently and the restoration contractor had to take down this ceiling.  he said it came down very easily, and he questioned the safety of this system.  in his words "i wouldnt sleep under this ceiling"

i am now wondering about the safety of this system?  have there been any cases of the ceiling falling down?  how much weight are the clips meant to carry?  any alternative "safer" systems?

 

 

thanks for your expertise!

Winston
 

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Ted White in action




There is nothing wrong with the design,


Here I hang from three layers of 5/8 on clips and channel




Water turns any drywall ceiling into mush. Usually the drywall drops on it's own.


Your contractor just wants to avoid the hassle of re-doing it.
 

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I see a new Ted White work out video series in the works! Perhaps even a Satuday AM infomercial!!!!
 

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"Clipping"... It's the new "Planking"...
 

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People tend to fear what they don't understand.
 
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just as a follow up, I've watched numerous individuals both DIY and Hired crews screw drywall to ceiling channel and there are a few things they do wrong. First they bring what they have learned from screwing into wood to the process. They think that the screw will tighten the drywall to the ceiling and that the spin action will sink the screws. The result is that they strip out the hole in the metal channel and the screw actually loses a big percentage of it's grip.


So lessons learned,


1) Push up with the lift or your hand holding the drywall tight to the channel

2) when you get close to sinking the screw, slow down and push hard on the screw, don't try to sink the screw by screwing it fast. Don't spin it in place. The first layer doesn't have to be sunk, just flush (or almost).

3) when in doubt use more screws

4 when you put up your first sheet, tug on the edge to see if your screws are holding.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC  /t/1520209/safety-of-sound-clips-for-ceiling-question#post_24421471


just as a follow up, I've watched numerous individuals both DIY and Hired crews screw drywall to ceiling channel and there are a few things they do wrong. First they bring what they have learned from screwing into wood to the process. They think that the screw will tighten the drywall to the ceiling and that the spin action will sink the screws. The result is that they strip out the hole in the metal channel and the screw actually loses a big percentage of it's grip.


So lessons learned,


1) Push up with the lift or your hand holding the drywall tight to the channel

2) when you get close to sinking the screw, slow down and push hard on the screw, don't try to sink the screw by screwing it fast. Don't spin it in place. The first layer doesn't have to be sunk, just flush (or almost).

3) when in doubt use more screws

4 when you put up your first sheet, tug on the edge to see if your screws are holding.

this is all very very good info for anyone who has not used channel before. You can easily strip the screw in the channel if you are gunning with an impact driver. just take it easy and slow.


jim
 

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just as a follow up, I've watched numerous individuals both DIY and Hired crews screw drywall to ceiling channel and there are a few things they do wrong. First they bring what they have learned from screwing into wood to the process. They think that the screw will tighten the drywall to the ceiling and that the spin action will sink the screws. The result is that they strip out the hole in the metal channel and the screw actually loses a big percentage of it's grip.

So lessons learned,

1) Push up with the lift or your hand holding the drywall tight to the channel
2) when you get close to sinking the screw, slow down and push hard on the screw, don't try to sink the screw by screwing it fast. Don't spin it in place. The first layer doesn't have to be sunk, just flush (or almost).
3) when in doubt use more screws
4 when you put up your first sheet, tug on the edge to see if your screws are holding.
I know this is a very old post but, I'm about to hang drywall on some RC. I rented a drywall gun, will this not suffice? I'm not sure if its as easy to control the speed of these drills as it is a conventional drill.
 

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on a couple of jobs the "pros" (guest workers) had to put away their drywall guns and borrow my impact driver to get better control over screw speed and depth. With a drywall gun it is easy to over spin the screw and strip the hole in the metal channel, having said that I've seen them also use them successfully. You need to practice.

The guy on stilts had no problem with his gun and did the entire ceiling without issue, he was a true pro. Those guys were strong doing 12 ft ceilings with no lift and 12 ft 5/8 sheets.

 

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Those guys were strong doing 12 ft ceilings with no lift and 12 ft 5/8 sheets.
Wow.

I bought 12-footer 5/8" before and it made friends and family cry just moving around one sheet at a time. Can't imagine installing those without a lift.

Tip 1: Don't hire crying friends and family... hire a pro... you get what you pay for.
Tip 2: Don't become a pro at anything that requires handling 12-foot 5/8" drywall without a lift.
Tip 3: Biggest regret of my rush build... I wish I would've had time to have 9-footers delivered.
 

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On that job there was a crew of 6-7 guys who did the 20x40x12 room in 5 hours, they started around 10 took an hour for lunch and were done by 4. They had one young kid who couldn't be more than 140 lbs. He was probably about 19. He was carrying the 12 ft sheets into the theater by himself. They were the home builders subcontractor crew and were doing the whole house.
 

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On that job there was a crew of 6-7 guys who did the 20x40x12 room in 5 hours, they started around 10 took an hour for lunch and were done by 4. They had one young kid who couldn't be more than 140 lbs. He was probably about 19. He was carrying the 12 ft sheets into the theater by himself. They were the home builders subcontractor crew and were doing the whole house.
That's impressive. Even with a drywall handle-type lifter, I had some trouble with 8 foot pieces. By the way, once you get used to lifting fire-rated drywall, then lift regular 1/2 inch drywall, it's like your lifting nothing at all.
 

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Ted White in action

There is nothing wrong with the design,

Here I hang from three layers of 5/8 on clips and channel



Water turns any drywall ceiling into mush. Usually the drywall drops on it's own.

Your contractor just wants to avoid the hassle of re-doing it.
To me, that appears that the ceiling is bowing downward. Is that the case or is that an effect of the picture?
 
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