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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
live concert dvds such as the latest Kyllie Minogue of The Corrs in London or Madonna or Peter Frampton requires PERFECT blacks ability, deep contrast and brillance in the image, with a good dose of great colors. CRTs at high resolutions and well calibrated excell in displaying these images.


Based on your expericence, which DLP (since black level and contrast are crucial ) would fit the job ?

Or none can ?........


this is what I mean:
http://www.corrsonline.com/downloads...l_live_002.jpg
http://www.corrsonline.com/downloads...l_live_004.jpg


photos courtesy of:
http://www.corrsonline.com/home/news/


thanks
 

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David,


There's nothing special about a concert DVD that makes any special requirements in terms of projection.


A movie may require the same level of black and color reproduction as a concert.


The concert, however, is probably shot with a video camera instead of a movie film camera.


That being the case - the native images are interlaced - that is the odd and even lines

of the image do not correspond to the same time.


This is in contrast to a movie image - where the entire image has the same time stamp since all of

the film frame was exposed at the same time.


Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi


yes but live concerts ( night concert or closed hall ) require constant high contrast and great blacks abilities vs film, which alternates night and day scenes generally, carries the typical film grain and never look as contrasted in theaters anyway ( rarely more than 800:1 real contrast ).

Concerts require brillant, shiny images, as scene on tvs. I have yet to see a digital projector that can reproduce such images as beautifully and realisticly (!) than CRT projectors.


rgds
 

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Sean,


Movie quality film grain is finer than the "grain" induced by the scan lines of a video camera. The

NTSC standard video camera has 480 scan lines.


High contrast images are actually EASIER to reproduce than images of softer contrast.


There are more gradations to get correct in a lower contrast image.


Take it to the logical limit - the highest contrast image is one that is black and white -

no gray.


It would take only 1 bit per pixel to encode such an image.


Digital projectors do have more of a problem doing black than a CRT; that's true. However, digital

projectors are usually brighter than CRTs.


There's no perfect technology, as yet, for producing projected images. Likewise, there's

nothing especially challenging about the image of a concert. The concerts may be all high contrast images,

but a movie can have high contrast images, as well as images with more subtle gradations.


Having the capability to project both high contrast and low contrast images well is more

challenging than a "one trick pony" projector that specializes in high contrast images.


Greg
 
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