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I have been looking at displays of the Samsung DLP. It seems slightly fatiguing to watch...almost like the picture is too bright or detailed or something. Has anyone noticed this? Does adjustment help? Does this pass over extended viewing? Am I just imagining things? Any help would be appreciated?
 

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These are very bright displays, set up to compete on a showroom floor. When watching movies at home, you will want to decrease the Contrast adjustment down to more acceptable levels. Also, I would recommend putting a back light/bias light, behind the set. This will alleviate much of the eyestrain. I recommend the Ideal-Lume brand bias light with some of their dimming filters, so it is kept to a subtle glow.
 

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The eye fatigue is due to the "strobe effect" from the spinning color wheel. This spinning wheel also causes some people to see rainbows.


If you consider purchasing this TV, I recommend purchase from a local store so that you have a 30 day return policy. I bought this TV recently and tried it out at home. My wife and I both experienced significant eye fatigue and headaches. This phenomenon occured even at more distant viewing distances so it was not because of sitting too close. Fortunately I had a 30 day return and got rid of this TV.


From reading this forum it seems that most people are not bothered by eye fatigue/headaches. You may be prone to it like I am. Make sure you have a 30 day return option if you buy this TV.


Rich
 

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I've had my 61" Samsung DLP for about 10 days and have experienced eye fatigue also. It definitely helps to lower the contrast, but I still find that I have to concentrate to keep my eyes relaxed (if that makes any sense).


What's worse for me is the rainbow effect. I watched the 50 inch DLP at the store and friends houses for a long time before I bought my 61 inch. Never saw rainbows on the 50, but see them almost constantly on the 61. I gues with the bigger screen, I'm moving my eyes around more and see the rainbows. I'm totally bummed because I love everything else about this TV.


This morning the lamp went out, so I'm taking it as divine intervention - the set is going back to CC. Hitachi 60v500 here I come.


...Mike.
 

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Quote:
HMmm... I thought they fixed the rainbow effect with the 2nd generation DLP?
Nope. The second generation chip only increased the tilt of the mirrors on the DMD chip, which results in a better contrast ratio. The spinning color wheel is unchanged (the cause of the rainbows), as far as I know.


James
 

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Yep, until they go with three DMD chips, one for each color, then they can drop the color wheel. However, I've seen estimates of over $15K for that sort of set if they did it now. Trade-offs, as always....
 

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I've experienced heavy eye fatigue on my Rear Proj. CRT model but then went away after about 3 weeks or so. I tried a back light, that seem to help a little but didn't solve the issue. This went on for a while, only when I calibrated the set, did the eye fatigue go away for the most part.
 

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I, too, initially experienced some fatigue with my Samsung HLN507W. I found the problem went away after 2-3 weeks. I don't know if it was the size (I was coming from a 32-inch), the technology, or the fact that my eyes were glued to the set during every discretionary hour.
 

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I experienced eye fatigue and headaches with my Sammy DLP for just under a week of viewing; after that, I haven't been bothered at all.
 

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Yes, I also experience a dizziness after watching a DLP-based set. Several (many of this thread in fact) say that it goes away after your brain gets used to how DLP renders its image. Given that most are claiming 1-3 weeks for that to occur the advise about a 30 day return policy seems pretty sound.
 

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1) Lower contrast

2) Sit 2+ X back

3) Use a bias light

4) Remember to blink


Don't underestimate that last one, these set's can be so stunning that many often do go for too long without blinking.

There are other adjustments that can contribute to some of the effects that I have read of people posting on this forum. The timing adjustment of the color wheel can correct many issues, but at some point, I'm sure there are a certain percentage that will be adversely affected by this technology. I just think that most of these instances being reported stem from improperly set up displays, or viewing habits.
 

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In reality refresh rate of colors is too high to cause eye fatigue. Most likely it's the size of the screen that's causing it. Coming from a moderate screen size to a big screen changes the way you watch TV. On regular size your eyes don't move much to hold the whole picture. On big wide HD screen you have to constantly (and subconcsiously) move the eyes to keep track of everything that's going on. It is also possible that after a while you get used to that movement, or maybe you get trained not to move your eyes that much.
 

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Originally posted by SethS
2) Sit 2+ X back
Is that twice the diagonal screen size or more? Or is X screen width or height?
 

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My preference for DLP displays is 2 or more times the screen width. At 4 times, it looks absolutely incredible, but for movies that would lose it's impact. I think when we are seeing native 1080x1920 running progressively, on a 3 chipper, we will be able to sit less than 2X. And again, this is just my opinion, but I am pretty particular about scaling artifacts, dithering, and screen door effects.
 

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As Seth says:
  • ~ don't watch in two dark a room, that's definitely fatiguing on a DLP

    ~ don't push Contrast too high, why crush whites anyway?

    ~ remember to blink!, funny but true

    ~ sit far enough away, we're at 2.5X screen width or 2.37X diagonal, any closer and I start to see individual pixels


Definitely get a 30 day trial period. $3K is too much to spend if it turns out DLP is not for you.
 

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First week with my new 61 DLP. My wife and I love it! No rainbows or eye/headache issues.


It's all personal. take some folding chairs to the showroom and watch for an hour or two.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Asx
In reality refresh rate of colors is too high to cause eye fatigue. Most likely it's the size of the screen that's causing it. Coming from a moderate screen size to a big screen changes the way you watch TV. On regular size your eyes don't move much to hold the whole picture. On big wide HD screen you have to constantly (and subconcsiously) move the eyes to keep track of everything that's going on. It is also possible that after a while you get used to that movement, or maybe you get trained not to move your eyes that much.
Not so. I am very used to a large screen and get dizzy-head on smaller DLP screens. It is because my brain at some level perceives the strobed build-up of colors and thinks it means I am about to fall off some high place :). People are weird that way.
 

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Some of the comments about eye fatigue and headaches with single chip DLP displays completely ignore the facts and the real world observations. The simple fact is that these displays cause significant eye fatigue and headaches in a certain segment of the population. This phenomenon is due to the spinning color wheel. It is not due to contrast being too high, sitting too close to the TV, forgetting to blink or any of the other ridiculous explanations I have read on this forum. The fact is that a certain percentage of the population cannot watch this technology without getting adverse effects. I don't know what this percentage is, I suspect likely >5% and 2.5x screen widths away is not really realistic and completely eliminates any immersive effect you might have in the programming. To suggest that the eye fatigue is simply from sitting too close is ignorant. I sit 1.5x screen width from my 92" FP CRT projected screen and have never gotten a headache or eye fatigue. I have gone to the movie theater with huge screens and have not gotten eye fatigue. I also have never gotten a headache from an IMAX presentation. The Sammy DLP gives me a friggin headache and it irritates me when individuals imply its because the contrast is too high.


The purpose of this forum is educational. A scientific method demands on an accurate tabulation of the facts and the data. The interpretation of this data can be subjective. All of the data I have read points to the spinning color wheel as the culprit behind eye fatigue and headaches in these display devices. Most people are not bothered by it and these DLP's make fine TV's. However, for some percentage of the population, no matter what you do to the contrast or viewing distance, these TV's are simply a terrible choice. The readers of this forum and the potential buyers of this display technology need to know this so they can make an informed buying decision. Burying one's head in the sand does not make the facts go away.


Rich
 
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