AVS Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking of buying a new TV.

Now it narrows down to the following two TVs:

1). Samsung LN55B650 LCD

2). Panasonic TC-P54G10 Plasma


Has any one bought one of these two TVs?

What are the pros and cons of each TV?


This will be a living room TV, mostly for watching TVs and DVDs.

Occasionally we may use this one for WII gaming.


Regards,

JC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I've been wrestling with this exact decision. It makes sense since one it the best LCD and one is the best plasma at that given price range. I think I'm gonna go for the Panasonic since it's cheaper, and from what I've read, plasma still offers the best PQ. Also, one of LCDs benefits, no glare, is gone with the Samsung since they now use glass! On top of that, the Panasonic has an anti-reflective covering, while the Samsung LCD does not (correct me if I'm wrong).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
Forget about the Wii with the Sammy. It will be unplayable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by tripppsta /forum/post/17016474


Why is the Wii a problem on the Sammy?

Bad Input lag. Also the Wii controller also have input lag on the start with the sensor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
If you were willing to step down to a 52" you could get the LN52B630 - this has a matte screen, taking the glare problem with the 650's out of the equation. The 630 also lacks the yahoo widgets that everyone says are too annoyingly slow to be really usable and, for that reason, can be had a good bit cheaper than the 650. It still has the killer USB connection though for playing back your files in full 1080p off a 2GB thumbdrive or 2TB external HDD. Just an idea.


The LCD/plasma issue really comes down to viewing environment - if you're going to be doing most of your viewing in a darkened room, go with the plasma; if you'll be watching mostly during the day or with lights on at night, go with the LCD. They're both great sets, so remember - the harder the decision, the more evenly matched the alternatives, so the less you really should be sweating it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
How much does motion blur play in this debate? I was on the fence with the G10/15 and B630 and it came down to price and a free Blu-Ray player so I bought the B630.


The picture is great but I'm having a hard time with the anti-blur and anti-judder settings on the B630. I find myself constantly messing with it. If I turn it up too high, it looks like a soap opera but too low then I get some bluring/stuttering. Is this a concern with plasmas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
That seems to be the setting I end up with. I'm not sure if Film mode is better or not. Need to play with it some more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dekruyter /forum/post/17754645


Settings of 10/3 on the Sammy are pretty common...this gives you lots of anti-blur, and some Judder control. I think Film mode and a few other settings also come into play.


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
"The TV always runs at 120 Hz.


"When AMP (Auto Motion Plus 120Hz) is off, the TV just takes the incoming signal and duplicates it to make 120 fps. If the source is 24p, then the TV plays that back as 24x5, which means there will be no 3-2 pulldown. If it's 30 or 60p, it just plays the signal back at 4x or 2x, respectively.


"When AMP is on, various amounts of interpolation are applied.


"New for this year, the interpolation can be adjusted separately for film (24p sources) and video (30p/60i sources). Some people complain that interpolating a film image creates a higher frame-rate-image that looks too much like video, because video has an inherently higher frame rate. You lose the judder that is inherent in film (for examples, see the card-dealing scene in Casino Royale, or the Quidditch game scene in the first Harry Potter movie).


"The Custom setting offers a Blur and a Judder reduction setting. Blur reduction changes the amount of interpolation for video sources. When BR is set to 0, there is no interpolation applied to video sources. At 10, the maximum amount of interpolation is applied.


"Judder reduction changes the amount of interpolation for film sources. Similar to BR, When JR is set to 0, there is no interpolation applied to film-based sources and at 10, the max amount is applied.


"If you don't like the 'video-ish' effect on film-based sources, you can increase Blur reduction (to get the motion resolution improvement for video sources) but reduce judder reduction (to limit, or eliminate, the 'smoothing' effect on film sources).


"The preset settings apply blur and judder reduction to varying degrees:

Clear - Blur is preset to High, where Judder is preset to Low.

Standard - Blur and Judder are both preset to a middle level

Smooth - Judder is preset to High, and Blur is preset to Low



"It is possible for the interpolation, particularly when set to the maximum, to create brief artifacts in complex, fast-moving images. This occurs less than 1% of the time with regular content. If this is bothersome, we suggest lowering the respective adjustment (or switch to the Standard AMP mode, which is the default, and keeps both adjustments at a midpoint)."




I then I asked about how to tell if a source is 24p, 30p, or 60i, since if you are watching a movie on HBO, your set top box is outputting 30p or 60i instead of 24p.


The Samsung rep said, "Actually, the TV will detect the original frame rate. If you play a BD of Harry Potter at 1080p/60, the TV will still apply the Judder Reduction interpolation setting."


His final advice about adjusting AMP is, "Users should just tweak blur and/or judder and see what kind of difference it makes on the program they're watching, or use known film or video content to adjust the levels, then trust that the settings will be applied to all similar content."


Now that you have the instructions for Auto Motion Plus 120Hz, I think you will find it is a powerful tool that you shouldn't ignore. I'm not telling what AMP setting that I finally settled on. I believe that it is a decision that you and your loved ones need to make in the privacy of your TV room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Excellent info. Thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dekruyter /forum/post/17756924


"The TV always runs at 120 Hz.


"When AMP (Auto Motion Plus 120Hz) is off, the TV just takes the incoming signal and duplicates it to make 120 fps. If the source is 24p, then the TV plays that back as 24x5, which means there will be no 3-2 pulldown. If it's 30 or 60p, it just plays the signal back at 4x or 2x, respectively.


"When AMP is on, various amounts of interpolation are applied.


"New for this year, the interpolation can be adjusted separately for film (24p sources) and video (30p/60i sources). Some people complain that interpolating a film image creates a higher frame-rate-image that looks too much like video, because video has an inherently higher frame rate. You lose the judder that is inherent in film (for examples, see the card-dealing scene in Casino Royale, or the Quidditch game scene in the first Harry Potter movie).


"The Custom setting offers a Blur and a Judder reduction setting. Blur reduction changes the amount of interpolation for video sources. When BR is set to 0, there is no interpolation applied to video sources. At 10, the maximum amount of interpolation is applied.


"Judder reduction changes the amount of interpolation for film sources. Similar to BR, When JR is set to 0, there is no interpolation applied to film-based sources and at 10, the max amount is applied.


"If you don't like the 'video-ish' effect on film-based sources, you can increase Blur reduction (to get the motion resolution improvement for video sources) but reduce judder reduction (to limit, or eliminate, the 'smoothing' effect on film sources).


"The preset settings apply blur and judder reduction to varying degrees:

Clear - Blur is preset to High, where Judder is preset to Low.

Standard - Blur and Judder are both preset to a middle level

Smooth - Judder is preset to High, and Blur is preset to Low



"It is possible for the interpolation, particularly when set to the maximum, to create brief artifacts in complex, fast-moving images. This occurs less than 1% of the time with regular content. If this is bothersome, we suggest lowering the respective adjustment (or switch to the Standard AMP mode, which is the default, and keeps both adjustments at a midpoint)."




I then I asked about how to tell if a source is 24p, 30p, or 60i, since if you are watching a movie on HBO, your set top box is outputting 30p or 60i instead of 24p.


The Samsung rep said, "Actually, the TV will detect the original frame rate. If you play a BD of Harry Potter at 1080p/60, the TV will still apply the Judder Reduction interpolation setting."


His final advice about adjusting AMP is, "Users should just tweak blur and/or judder and see what kind of difference it makes on the program they're watching, or use known film or video content to adjust the levels, then trust that the settings will be applied to all similar content."


Now that you have the instructions for Auto Motion Plus 120Hz, I think you will find it is a powerful tool that you shouldn't ignore. I'm not telling what AMP setting that I finally settled on. I believe that it is a decision that you and your loved ones need to make in the privacy of your TV room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,720 Posts
In other words Lcd because it still has alot of issues that are visable you dont want it. plasma is the best choice panasonic first then samsung that is IMO
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top