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What are the Pros and Cons of using gray letterboxing bars on the Samsung SIRT-150 vs. black? I am using a 32" 4x3 Loewe TV through VGA progressive input.


Once I've activated the gray bars according to the manual, how do I get the black bars back?
 

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For a Direct view TV, the CRT burn-in problem is not a big concern. So choose whichever one you like better. Personaly, I find the gray bar distracting so I switched back to black bars.


To toggle between black and gray bars, use the same procedure that turned it on: In menu, move the pointer to Help, make sure help is off, then press Display button.


Hal
 

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Hal,


I'm new to all this HT stuff, only recently started mass amounts of reading in prep to upgrade the video part of my set-up and have near-zero practical experience, but I'm somewhat confused by that reply. :confused:


With black borders, doesn't the image part (moving or otherwise) of the screen eventually burn-in the phosphers -- at least more so than the border parts? Won't this be evident once you view an image that fills the whole screen? Granted for a moving image, it may take > 2 years for any noticeable burn-in (center .vs. black borders), but doesn't a lit-up phospher degrade differently than a "black" phospher?


The best example of this is an old ATM machines that has the "welcome screen" burned into them. The only article I found that gives any guideline to limit this aspect-ratio burn-in issue is the following: http://www.digitaltelevision.com/con...con0800a.shtml He recommends a 15% usage limit to avoid burn-in.


Or perhaps, all the confusion is just a matter of degree. :cool:
 

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Yep Monkey... the moving part of the picture (the bright area) wears the phosphors faster than the dark letterbox/pillarbox edges. So eventually what you'd see when watching a full-screen image years later would be a picture that's dimmer in the middle and brighter on the edges where the dark bars usually were.
 
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