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Discussion Starter #3
I'm using Calman 4.2, Colormunki Spectro, PS3, and AVSHD 709. First time using a spectro as I already own a standard i1d2 by xrite. I haven't profiled it yet. It's also a first using using full 10pt, and a 3d cms. The resolution and pq looks as if I'm staring through a window at live people.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwor /forum/post/20344327


I'm using Calman 4.2, Colormunki Spectro, PS3, and AVSHD 709. First time using a spectro as I already own a standard i1d2 by xrite. I haven't profiled it yet. It's also a first using using full 10pt, and a 3d cms. The resolution and pq looks as if I'm staring through a window at live people.

Yeah. That's "the look", the almost 3D effect that a fully calibrated display can yield. It's the look that those who say they don't need pro calibration because their picture looks good to them will never see. I'd wager 99+% of these opinionates have never seen a calibrated TV.



Nice job for your first 10 pt. and CMS BTW.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks! Once again this site pulls me through with shyte loads of info and experience to guide us. I do want to point out that the overall out-of-box settings were NOT far off from the rec709 standards. After disabling anything "auto" related it was a smooth ride from there. The RGB instead of HSL for the cms was confusing until reading Huffman's rgb how-to post. This tv is excellent for under $2k. Calibration also fixed the flashlighting issue on the black bars. Dark scenes and shadow detail are astounding while watching The Dark Knight and Constantine again. Contrast is excellent and I couldn't be happier. You're right on the money Buzzard. I guess it's a matter of "if you don't see it, you don't believe in it". I wonder if Samsung has been reading posts on this site and listening to the calibration experts on the 2011 lineup?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 /forum/post/20344347


Yeah. That's "the look", the almost 3D effect that a fully calibrated display can yield. It's the look that those who say they don't need pro calibration because their picture looks good to them will never see. I'd wager 99+% of these opinionates have never seen a calibrated TV.



Nice job for your first 10 pt. and CMS BTW.

The thing is not all displays have such control over how they can be calibrated. My Panny S2 for instance doesn't have gamma control or CMS or a 10 pt grayscale adjustment (it has the standard RGB low and high adjustments, is that considered 6 pt?)


So even if I paid to get my set calibrated, it wouldn't attain that 3D look unless I added an external processor like a dvdo which costs alot of cash.


I still want to buy myself a meter and see if I can improve it or not. Thinking of getting an i1display LT and see just how off my grayscale and perhaps colors are off.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fairchild99 /forum/post/20344492


The thing is not all displays have such control over how they can be calibrated. My Panny S2 for instance doesn't have gamma control or CMS or a 10 pt grayscale adjustment (it has the standard RGB low and high adjustments, is that considered 6 pt?)


So even if I paid to get my set calibrated, it wouldn't attain that 3D look unless I added an external processor like a dvdo which costs alot of cash.


I still want to buy myself a meter and see if I can improve it or not. Thinking of getting an i1display LT and see just how off my grayscale and perhaps colors are off.

That is 2 point grayscale control.


You'd be wasting $300 for a pro calibration as there is precious little more he can do than what you can adjust with a calibration disc. If you had something like a DVDO iScan Duo VP the set could be fully calibrated. You'd also get the benefit of the plethora of other goodies a VP has to offer plus it is portable and moves on to your future displays. Expensive up front but not so much in the long run. You might actually save money by purchasing lower model less expensive TVs that with a VP can be "upgraded" to full calibration ability.
 

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Hi,

I am nowhere near the technical ability posted here, but I wonder are there settings that you have set on the tv itself that I can use? I know you used major technical equipment that I do not have access to, but would I be able to use any of the documents you provided to calibrate my tv manually?


I had a dlp that I loved, but it had the misfortune of having an irreparable problem that after 2 years, Samsung upgraded me to the un55d6000.


Now I am in way over my head with this tv, but I would like to have it work as best as it can so that my wife doesn't divorce me from the constant aggravation. (We put the other tv on payments to pay it off, and it was broke before we even finished paying it off. Now we have to take a loan to be able to afford this upgrade, so paying a professional to come calibrate it is pretty much out of the question.)


Any guidance would be MUCH appreciated!


-Henry
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hmm, I understand your goal and good intentions. Unfortunately, the request is what's called "sharing settings" and is frowned upon in these forums as punishable by death using feral slugs. On the other side of the coin, using a dvd like AVSHD in your dvd/bp player can help. The brightness portion is easy and the contrast really needs a meter because Sammies don't clip whites by default (2010 and up). Can your borrow a meter? A spectrodometer is preferred.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I also want to point out that if you set your contrast somewhere inbetween 80-85 and adjust brightness to that (using AVSHD, which is free from this site). try lowering your backlight/cell light too. It's a good start
 

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Greetings


A test disc is plenty good to get a lot of improvements. It can help you set brightness and contrast ... and color and tint ... (use blue only mode in TV) and sharpness.


Do all this in movie mode (correctly) and you have a greater portion of improvements than just doing grayscale and cms and nothing else.


One does not need a meter to set contrast. Just follow the three rules for setting contrast and you are good.


No clipping

No discoloration

No eye fatigue (if it hurts your head to hit it against the wall ... you should stop)


Regards
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm not a professional by a long shot, but how do you follow the three rules if none of them occur OOTB? An example is a set not clipping or showing discoloration at default. both of my tv's are a PN42c450 -2010 and a UN55D6000-2011. One plasma and the other lcd. Neither have these signs.
 

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Greetings


If the contrast pattern used does not show clipping ... then you have met rule 1 and you didn't have to do anything.


If the contrast pattern does not show discoloration ... then you have met rule 2 and you didn't have to do anything.


Now onto rule 3 ... eye fatigue. And it isn't about some specific 35 fL number either.


Problem for me is that half my clients who tell me they are enthusiasts and have used a test disc already ... ended up doing it wrong. They all tell me they did it right. So who is lying to me? The grand assumption is that one actually follows the rules correctly ...


regards
 

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@jwor - those are incredibly accurate results. Nice work



I wanted to ask you about the 51.58 Y @100IRE - do you watch TV in a pretty dark environment?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I won't get into a long debate, but I will say that the results speak for themselves regarding my comprehension level.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My living room has "moderate" ambient lighting seeping through my blinds and a half-moon upper window. A gamma of 2.1 is a slightly preferred setting vs 2.2 because of that. The default cell light mark was too bright in my own opinion for all around viewing for day/night programming. Through trial and error calibrating at different levels is in fact a matter of personal choice. Cell light settings don't have to match a specific number but rather open guidelines listed all around these forums and the internet. As stated before by Mike, if it burns your retina, you may want to adjust it down. Likewise, if your straining to make out the image then increase it. Wash, rinse, repeat lol.


P.S. The meter was a suggestion simply because eyeballing vs software made a huge difference in perception and enjoyment. You don't NEED a meter, but it makes a world of difference!
 
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