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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently using cable but plan to go to satellite soon.

Are there issues with poor reception of satellite during bad weather ?

I just want to see if there is any truth to all those cable VS. satellite commercials.:rolleyes:


If it makes any difference, the view to the southern sky from my house is totally clear of any obstructions.

Please exuse my ingnorance if this is a dumb question.

Thanks.
 

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Some people say they have problems with this a lot, and some people say they never have problems. I think a lot of it has to do with how well your dish is aimed at the satellites.


It is a physical fact that water droplets will attenuate (lessen) the signal from the satellites. Since the signals are "digital", you won't notice a differnece between an "OK", "good", or "great" signal under normal circumstances. But, if nature intervenes and takes away some of your signal strenght, a "great" might go down to "good" or "OK" and you won't notice a thing. However, a "good" could possibly go below "OK", or an "OK" could get attenuated, and you'd loose signal.


By the way, these "OK", "good", and "great" ranges are just terms I made up for illustration.


It sounds like you might have a great line-of-site to the satellites, which means if your installation is done correctly, you should get decent signals and probably not have much problem with weather conditions. But every setup is different ("your mileage may vary"). I think a lot of people who have problems are trying to work around trees, etc.


My dad has a clear line of sight to the satellites, and has no problems with bad weather. He's had service for over 3 years now, and I think he said he's lost signal for short periods only once or twice.


If it's really a problem, and a concern, you can always use seperate 18" dishes for each satellite, instead of a multi-satellite dish. This should give you stronger signals, giving you more room to tollerate an attenuated signal. And furthermore, it is possible to get larger (24" or maybe even larger) round dishes, rather than 18" dishes. This is probably going overboard, but if it is an important issue, you can do these things.


Hope this is helpful.


- Bob
 

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If you're talking about the cable company's ads on bashing DBS - they are definately an extreme exageration. I've had DBS since Oct 2000, and the ONLY times I lose reception is when there are thunderstorms off to the southwest bad enough that you really should be finding shelter - rain coming down in buckets, hail etc. I never even completely lost reception during Isabel - couple times it pixelated, but nothing permanent (more than 2-3 minutes). Summer thunderstorms can take you down for 10-30 minutes - 2-3 times a year. I keep my OTA antenna maintained for these times - and I would recommend this if you're concerned about local news during these weather events anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Scooper!

It sounds like it is just very isolated instances when this happens.

Thanks for the feedback.


Can an OTA antenna be run through RG6 to the display ?


Are there OTA antennas that "tie" into the same wires running from the actual dish to the receiver / display ?


I'm just trying figure out how many wires I will need to run from my dish to the viewing locations.
 

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Yes it can - it depends on what exactly you want to do. Best for everything (IMHO) is to run dedicated cables for each - a dedicated cable per satellite tuner, and a dedicated cable for cable /OTA, especially if you want to split the OTA (you can't split the DBS RG6 cables).


You can get devices called diplexors that allow you to use 1 RG6 cable for one satellite tuner / OTA. You would use one at each end - one diplexor to join them, and another to split them out again.


OTA antennas - you need to provide more info on your location and what stations you wish to receive before anyone can give a realistic answer as the the most appropriate antenna for your location. www.antennaweb.org is a good place to start.
 

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I'm actually in the process of switching back to cable from Directv. I have a triple LNB RCA dish. Whenever the temp drops below 20 degrees or so, I lose signal. Directv says there's a known 'rare problem' with RCA and Terk triple LNB dishes where they dont pick up signal well in cold weather. Frankly, that sounds like a load of BS to me.


I've gone out and checked all the connections, which are fine. I can verify that, when the weather is fine, I'm getting signals no less then 85 on the transponders. But when its cold...no tv.


What's interesting is that, last winter (when it was almost as cold), this didn't happen much. But this season, it has been ridiculous.


Directv's answer is to rebate me for the days missed, and I've been told to buy a 'dish warmer'. Anyone ever see one of those?


To me, the appropriate response would be, 'Yes sir, we will send someone out to replace your dish asap'. Particularly since I am a premier, 4 tv, HD customer. But since not one store can supply a dish warmer, I am off to Cable television land, to deal with Cablevision's lack of DVI connection.


In regards to your decision, all I can say is that I think you should consider a coax pipe to your house to be more reliable then a satelite system will ever be.


Regards, Allan
 

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Actually- what needs replacing is the LNB's not the whole dish.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Scooper
Actually- what needs replacing is the LNB's not the whole dish.
Sounds like a relatively simple procedure to fix. No need to go back to cable, nightfly1! Perhaps you can persuade D* to replace the LNBs. You can probably install them yourself.
 

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Living in Texas we get some huge thunderstorms. We lose signal mayb 30 minutes a year. Worst is Spring time when the air is warming up. This is actually better than when I had cable. I lost signal there more often.
 

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Another me too response, but I've had Dish Network for over 7 years. I can count on 1 hand the number of times I've lost picture due to weather. I'm in Texas and we get some MAJOR storms here. We also have temperature extremes; single digit to 113. Unless you live in Monsoonland, I wouldn't let weather prevent you from going satellite.


-- Denis
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Scooper
Actually- what needs replacing is the LNB's not the whole dish.
I'm trying to get Directv to do this..they want me to call back the next time the signal is dead (its supposed to be cold tonight, so lets see..).


Are the LNBs easy to replace? Why would this happen on a 13month old system?



thx
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Calabs
I took a pole last month to ask that very question. I've since switched to D* and have had several snow and rain storms. No loss of signal yet! Check out the pole here to get more feedback.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=338394
It's too bad when I started this pole, there is not way to put geographical location, etc. as this has a LOT to do with how often you will lose signal. This pole and the one I took regarding "Have you ever had to realign your dish" convinced me to go with D*. I've only had it since the beginning of this month, but here in NJ, we've had snow storms (the fluffy kind and the wet kind), rain, and VERY cold weather (single digits). I have not lost reception once. Besides weather, another factor that seem to take a major role in reception is how well the system was installed. A bad install will give you nothing but headaches! :mad:
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by nightfly1
I'm trying to get Directv to do this..they want me to call back the next time the signal is dead (its supposed to be cold tonight, so lets see..).


Are the LNBs easy to replace? Why would this happen on a 13month old system?

thx
They're easy to replace, as long as the cables going into them are OK. Just a simple swap job. ;)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by nightfly1
Why would this happen on a 13month old system?
It was covered extensively last winter. There was a bad batch of the LNB/switch combinations. A search in the HDTV Hardware section should bring up the old threads and how everyone convinced DirecTV to switch them out.


-Robert
 

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I had a problem where I lost all Sat 101 channels. I called Terk (my antenna is Terk S25 iwith an Hughes #-86 HD receiver- 6 months old). As soon as I told Terk what was happening, they sent me a new LNBf at no cost. It solved the problem. I have read on other boards about this problem. For some reason, I had more of problem on my HD receiver than my older Hughes non-HD receiver. Both are working now & it was 7 degrees last night.


Hope this helps,

Dale
 

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I have my dishes on the balcony, inside of the railing, so they rarely get more than a skiff of snow on them. I have lost signal, maybe, three times in 5 years. These times were during extreme weather conditions, which even wiped out the microwave signals to local stations mountaintop transmitter sites, so I don't blame the satellites!


Putting a DBS dish where you can reach it with a small broom or "foxtail" brush is a good idea for snowy weather. They don't really need to be on top of the roof in most cases.....just outside an upstairs window works fine.
 
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