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I'm getting a Sharp XV-Z9000, a RCA HDTV satellite receiver, and a Panasonic RP91 DVD player. I believe I'll need a scaler to project a HDTV signal. Can someone assist me with options on scalers, and for the price which will be best for me? Thanks
 

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The 9000 has onboard scaler so you don't need one. However, some who have 720p sources are getting a better picture by bypassing the 9000 scaler feeding the VGA port. Neither your RCA nor your Panasonic will generate 720p signals so the point is moot for you. (The RCA was the first HD receiver and won't output 720p; nearly all of the later receivers can be set to output 720p.)
 

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A faroudja NR would be your best bet. The projector is 60hz, so is the NR. The projector is 1280x720, so is the NR. The projector has no DVI inputs and the NR provides no DVI outputs. The NR is the worlds best on Video deinterlacing and far better than the internal scaler on the Sharp for film. It also can do video switching allowing for a single cable run to the projector. The only question is if the NR can output via D-sub, thus bypassing the Sharps internal scaler. If you don't run D-sub, there is no other way to bypass the internal scaler on the Sharp. This is a Sharp related issue and not a Faroudja issue. If the Faroudja cannot output via d-sub you could buy a breakout cable that will output via component video and convert the signal into D-sub to bypas the internal scaler. Your next best bet would be a Leeza. More expensive than the projector and certainly overkill in the connections department, but it can be run out d-sub if you have an original Leeza or just use another breakout cable..
 

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I believe the term "d-sub" is simply used to describe the connector type. For instance, a DB9 or DB25 connector are also considered d-subs because of their shape. The d-sub input on the Japanese Sharp 9000 is a D4 input and is widely used in Japan.


While I'm not clear and all that it can do, it appears to take only take in component video. To use the input you'll need a cable to take 3-channel component to the D4 connector.


If you buy it in the US this won't be an issue since it does not have a D4 input. Of course you'll pay a lot more too.
 

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Tom: there is an anamoly with the Sharp, it can only bypass it's internal scaler when using RGB thru the D-Sub connector. It cannot be bypassed using ANY other input including D4, Component, composite or S video.
 

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I guess I'm slow...


When you say "d-sub" do you mean the 15-pin VGA input? Where on the projector is this connector? I'm just trying to figure out which one you are talking about.


Thanks!
 

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I've attached a picture of the panel from the Japanese Sharp 9000 for your review.
 

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Gladiator is correct, the d-sub 15 RGB input is the only input that bypasses the internal scaler. It is input #5 and is located above the colored rca inputs.
 

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Great! So it's the 15-pin input and not the D4. Cool.


Thanks.
 

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I have a VGA cable running from my equipment rack to my Sharp 9000 that I'm not using. Can I use this with the Faroudja NRS so I don't have to run another cable?


I have my DVD player connected to the Sharp on input 1 (component). I have a composite and s-video feed coming from my HT reciever. I had a VGA cable pulled with the installation in case I wanted to use a computer or a RCA Hi Def direct TV reciever with the 9000. I really don't want the hassle of running another cable, I'm hoping the existing VGA cable will work with the Faroudja if I get one (still thinking about it).



Corey J
 

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MOONEYCJ: If the run is short it should work with the NR. The NR is not designed to output a strong enough signal more than 15 feet without some sort of signal amplifier/booster. I am not saying it won't work, but you have to try.
 

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ericbee:


I guess I didnt' make myself clear. Does the NRS have a VGA output? Otherwise I'll need some type of cable adapter. It may be a moot point anyway as I have 35 feet of cable for the signal to traverse.


Corey J
 

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How does the Sharp scale something that is already in it's native format 1280x720?
 

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If the video is already 720p, why/how could it scale? It is already the right size and progressive scan...


I have about a fifteen foot run of VGA cable from my NRS to HD RPTV and it looks great if thats any help.
 

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I recall one must disable scaling on Input 5 in the 9000 menu - check other threads to confirm. I don't believe it's autobypassed when a 720p signal is seen. Yes, that means you're enduring a 720p->720p conversion with all associated degradation - the scaler cares not one iota that the source rate already matches the target rate!


One quick visual clue as to whether the scaler is in circuit or not: if bypassed you should see 0% overscan.
 

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I guess the problem is that I don't understand what you mean...


I'm familiar with some projectors that have an expected resolution that isn't their native panel res. This leads to a degradation in quality for what the designers thought was ease of use.


But what exactly can the scaler do to 720p? Scale it up to some arbitrary amount and then back down? All the things I've read about how the scalers usually work is based on an algorithim with no middle-step. Also, it really can't mess up the deinterlacing, since it isn't interlaced.


Admittedly, I've never seen one of these. I'm just trying to figure out why they would put out something that mucked with its native res which also happened to be a reasonably popular HDTV standard.
 

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Any consumer-grade video processing circuitry, particular something as complex as a scaler, is bound to introduce some artifacts, throw away a little resolution, etc. Think of what is happening: three analog signals (RGB) must undergo A/D conversion, be buffered, have mathematical equations run to produce new pixel values, some equations are for other processing that is included such as gamma correction or overscanning etc. Just the introduction of overscan alone is likely to change the value of every "pixel" in the incoming signal. So when I say "scaling" I'm really talking more about the entire circuit path between the VGA connector and the DMD chip, than just the scaling per se. Anyone who has seen high-quality 720p material on the Sharp with and without the scaler bypass, can immediately see the effect.


You have to get into prosumer or broadcast-grade scalers to avoid introducing degradation; these scalers are not found in consumer displays.


When DVI connections start showing up in our homes, the problem is not quite solved. In any given TV there may be an arbitrary amount of processing done on the DVI signal before pixels arrive at the display panel; having our video in digital source form does not guarantee pixel-perfect addressability!
 
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