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First off, thanks for everyone's contributions to this forum. I've been reading it pretty religiously the past several weeks and has helped me get up to speed with these things.

I'm at the point where I've decided on a projector (BenQ w1070) and a number of other room based improvements, but would like some input re: screen selection and paint selection.

I've attached a diagram of my proposed set-up. I'd say it can range from minimal to moderate ambient light, but never no ambient light. There are two windows with 2" faux wood blinds on them, so I'll never get total black out but I like the gradient of light which can be provided by the blinds over black out shades. There will also be mild to moderate light coming from around/underneath door entrances, which are next to the screen area, and light coming from the projector, which will have a relatively short throw (10' 3"). Rest of the room is a combination of decorator's white (lower half) and Pilgrim Gray (blue/gray, top half).

For the screen, I plan to use 16:9 aspect ratio and would like to watch a combination of TV, movies, and video games on it. I don't plan to exclusively watch in low light settings, really only plan to try to minimize ambient light during movies. SMPTE and THX recommend a max screen size around 90" for my seating location (around 10-11 feet w/ minimal upward angle).

I plan to make a floating screen ~1" off wall using either mdf/hardboard, or gluing a piece of primed/painted laminate. Will make screen somewhere in the 90-100" diag range so I don't think a frame w/ fabric will be necessary. The part that is most confusing to me is the paint. I've read through the beginners paint thread, which is a good primer but it seems most of the projectors they are referencing are in the 400-500 lumen range. With a much brighter projector like the w1070, I'm having a hard time deciding on a shade of gray.

Any tips re: paint selection and/or any other suggestions about the set-up, room, general tips would be great. This is my first projector/home theater/home in general so I'm learning a lot of new tips every day. Thanks.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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First off, thanks for everyone's contributions to this forum. I've been reading it pretty religiously the past several weeks and has helped me get up to speed with these things.
A little prayer couldn't help either.

I'm at the point where I've decided on a projector (BenQ w1070) and a number of other room based improvements, but would like some input re: screen selection and paint selection.
Maybe a lot of prayer. Why that PJ? With ambient light to have to deal with, you need both good contrast and the best possible Blacks to start out with. Consider a Epson 3000 instead.

I've attached a diagram of my proposed set-up. I'd say it can range from minimal to moderate ambient light, but never no ambient light. There are two windows with 2" faux wood blinds on them, so I'll never get total black out but I like the gradient of light which can be provided by the blinds over black out shades. There will also be mild to moderate light coming from around/underneath door entrances, which are next to the screen area, and light coming from the projector, which will have a relatively short throw (10' 3"). Rest of the room is a combination of decorator's white (lower half) and Pilgrim Gray (blue/gray, top half).
Not too bad, except I would suggest using as dark a shade of Pilgrim Grey as pssible, and a 3-4x lighter shade on the lower half. That would look very good....and if you simp0ly had to have white anywhere for relief, do so on the Room's Trim. Otherwise, use a Flat Interior Enamel as the Base for all paints except Trim, which should be a Satin Enamel.

For the screen, I plan to use 16:9 aspect ratio and would like to watch a combination of TV, movies, and video games on it. I don't plan to exclusively watch in low light settings, really only plan to try to minimize ambient light during movies. SMPTE and THX recommend a max screen size around 90" for my seating location (around 10-11 feet w/ minimal upward angle).
Wadda they know from nuthin'...NUTHIN'!

Your good for 100" easily, and 110" diagonal is completely do-able.

I plan to make a floating screen ~1" off wall using either mdf/hardboard, or gluing a piece of primed/painted laminate. Will make screen somewhere in the 90-100" diag. range so I don't think a frame w/ fabric will be necessary.
If you stick to 98" diagonal, and use an inexpensive material like Thrifty White hardboard (Home Depot), and attach it to a Frame made of 1x4s lying flat, you can construct the Frame and Screen surface for well under $50.00

The part that is most confusing to me is the paint. I've read through the beginners paint thread, which is a good primer but it seems most of the projectors they are referencing are in the 400-500 lumen range. With a much brighter projector like the w1070, I'm having a hard time deciding on a shade of gray.
Since some Ambient light issues are going to be present, I suggest you consider a paint application that will work to improve the Black levels of the W1070 white not suffocating your whites. That could entail on the most basic level a Flat Grey such as :
Glidden 00NN 62/000 . . . "Universal Gray" [N8.3]

Or for best results, RS-MaxxMudd Standard with 8 oz additional UPW added

00NN 62/000 . . . "Universal Gray" [N8.3]

Any tips re: paint selection and/or any other suggestions about the set-up, room, general tips would be great. This is my first projector/home theater/home in general so I'm learning a lot of new tips every day. Thanks.
You should prime the Thrifty White with Glidden Gripper Primer first.
Use only highest quality Low nap Roller Covers and a Roller Wand that spins freely on Ball bearings.
Always use a New Roller for each coat...it's not with the savings to have to potentially deal with texture imparted by the separation of a Roller's Fibers.
When attaching the Thrifty White to the Frame, use Power Grab Heavy Duty Water based adhesive, liberally...but spread out evenly across the wood surface. It's basically re positional for a minute or two, but if your not going to have any edge lighting, the having only a 1/2" overlap around the edges makes for a better "Floater".
 

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Maybe a lot of prayer. Why that PJ? With ambient light to have to deal with, you need both good contrast and the best possible Blacks to start out with. Consider a Epson 3000 instead.
Unless you run the 3000 in its very loud boost-mode lamp setting, it measures the same brightness and contrast as the w1070, but the 3000 suffers with significantly worse lag more expensive lamps that last less time and the 3000 itself costs nearly twice as much.
For someone with severe RBE-sensitivity or awkward mounting requirements the 3000 is a great alternative, otherwise it doesn't really offer any advantage.

Does the added white into that maxxmudd allow it to be rolled or must it still be sprayed?

A mix of 1quart Disney/Glidden metallic (~$15 at walmart) and 2/3rds of a quart of flat dark grey ("Grey Tabby" OONN 16/000) would be easily rollable, as bright as UniversalGrey and much more effective for fighting light that's in the room. Rolled onto a smooth mdf panel that's cut down to 98-100" and glued to a simple poplar frame as MM described..
Cheap, easy, effective.

I rolled one with a 3/8 bargain roller (needed to use them up) and it STILL turned out great despite my lack of painting skill..I'd highly recommend using a 1/4nap roller-cover instead and fresh roller-cover for both coats just as MM said..I sadly have made the mistake of re-using a cover, it turned out really bumpy.

The flat-matte UniversalGrey won't be as effective against the lights, but plain flat paint IS a sure thing compared to any specialty mix..even if you're painting with a rag held between your toes, flat paint won't turn out bad. It's ridiculously forgiving.
 

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Unless you run the 3000 in its very loud boost-mode lamp setting, it measures the same brightness and contrast as the w1070, but the 3000 suffers with significantly worse lag more expensive lamps that last less time and the 3000 itself costs nearly twice as much.
For someone with severe RBE-sensitivity or awkward mounting requirements the 3000 is a great alternative, otherwise it doesn't really offer any advantage.

Does the added white into that maxxmudd allow it to be rolled or must it still be sprayed?

A mix of 1quart Disney/Glidden metallic (~$15 at walmart) and 2/3rds of a quart of flat dark grey ("Grey Tabby" OONN 16/000) would be easily rollable, as bright as UniversalGrey and much more effective for fighting light that's in the room. Rolled onto a smooth mdf panel that's cut down to 98-100" and glued to a simple poplar frame as MM described..
Cheap, easy, effective.

I rolled one with a 3/8 bargain roller (needed to use them up) and it STILL turned out great despite my lack of painting skill..I'd highly recommend using a 1/4nap roller-cover instead and fresh roller-cover for both coats just as MM said..I sadly have made the mistake of re-using a cover, it turned out really bumpy.

The flat-matte UniversalGrey won't be as effective against the lights, but plain flat paint IS a sure thing compared to any specialty mix..even if you're painting with a rag held between your toes, flat paint won't turn out bad. It's ridiculously forgiving.
Where did you come up with the Epson 3000 has the same contrast as the BenQ W1070. The 1070 has a contrast ratio of 10000:1, whereas the 3000 has a contrast ratio of 60000:1, six times greater.
 

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Where did you come up with the Epson 3000 has the same contrast as the BenQ W1070. The 1070 has a contrast ratio of 10000:1, whereas the 3000 has a contrast ratio of 60000:1, six times greater.
I've seen both projectors side by side. With Epson's dynamic iris turned off, (I always turn them off) the contrast between the two is about the same. The Epson gains a small advantage at times with the dynamic iris turned on. Natively, I'd say both projectors are around 1200-1500:1 contrast ratio. The EPSON can probably see as much as 3000:1 at times with the dynamic iris engaged. But even with the iris advantage, there really isn't enough of a difference to my eyes to say one is much better than the other.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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All I see in posts like the above are "assumptions" and "speculations". And they are based upon personal "eye ballin' " not actual measurements.

Yes, the contrast ratio of the Epson is "On-Off" and does depend upon the Auto Iris to reach the maximum level claimed (...or thereabouts...)
but still, the difference is there, it's noticeable by those who actually have seen both (...but usually separately...) , and the reason is that the BenQ does a poorer job isolating the light output of the Engine from the single Chip's edges, and that subsequent leakage is what screws with the black levels.

But after all that is said, other advantages come into play, such as Lens Shift that actually accomplishes something worthwhile, (...and without a screwdriver...) :rolleyes: ... as well as a huge difference in Zoom capability...a 2 Year Warranty...among a few other items.
 

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All I see in posts like the above are "assumptions" and "speculations". And they are based upon personal "eye ballin' " not actual measurements.

Yes, the contrast ratio of the Epson is "On-Off" and does depend upon the Auto Iris to reach the maximum level claimed (...or thereabouts...)
but still, the difference is there, it's noticeable by those who actually have seen both (...but usually separately...) , and the reason is that the BenQ does a poorer job isolating the light output of the Engine from the single Chip's edges, and that subsequent leakage is what screws with the black levels.

But after all that is said, other advantages come into play, such as Lens Shift that actually accomplishes something worthwhile, (...and without a screwdriver...) :rolleyes: ... as well as a huge difference in Zoom capability...a 2 Year Warranty...among a few other items.
The zoom and lens-shift will either be needed or not (as I said, if you need them, the Epson is a good option to get them), but that's not typically required for ceiling mounting...helpful if someone needs to shelf-mount though.
The Benq's dynamic on/off CR doubles via its dynamic brightness as well if that's what is preferred (that is a measurement not a speculation..its Native CR in full+cinema measures ~1500:1 and doubles to 3000:1 with dynamic lamp engaged).

If someone wants or needs additional lenshift, an extra 1.6:1 (vs the Benq 1.3:1) zoom, or otherwise can't use the w1070, the 3000 is a good alternative..though the Benq is better at fast-motion, cleaner 3D, ansi contrast, lamp price and longevity, pixel-fill ratio, alignment, and costs about half as much.
If you really want, I suppose you could spend a little of the savings to add an extra year to the warranty and still come out ahead by several hundred $$$.

I'm also pretty sure ben38 has measured the w1070 (unless I'm mixing up with a different forum member)..so there's that.

If anyone else has some measurement to lend, I'd prefer they speak-up.


Where did you come up with the Epson 3000 has the same contrast as the BenQ W1070. The 1070 has a contrast ratio of 10000:1, whereas the 3000 has a contrast ratio of 60000:1, six times greater.
Neither of those is true. Manufacturers are allowed to make up completely random numbers for contrast specs. It is an unpoliced spec, and that's why 3rd party real-world measurement is as much or even more important for contrast than it is for lumen specs.
In truth, you won't find a projector under $2000 that measures over 2000:1 contrast (except when a $2000+ projector goes on clearance or is sold used).
The w1070 just happens to pair one of the best under $2000 contrast numbers with an excellent out-of-box calibration for a natural smooth image at one of the lowest prices for 1080p.

Its native CR is actually higher than the 2000/2030's dynamic CR (and about 5X higher than its native) despite their manufacturers' claimed contrast being very similar. Luckily the 3000 takes after the 8350/8345 more than the 2000/2030 in CR and flexibility...wish the 3000 had the 8345's fast inputs. :( there isn't an LCD out that matches the 8345/8350 for gaming.
 
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