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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm saving my pennies at present for a Seymour AV Proscenium Masking Frame (PRH130 16:9 130"w, 149.2"d). In the interim I decided to work up some masking for my Silver Ticket 16:9 (150"d) screen. Just something quick and easy to tide me over. Pretty pleased with the end result. Thought I'd share. Details provided below.

So before I reveal the man behind the curtain I thought I'd share a quick video which demonstrates the process of moving the masking into position. In this case I'm masking down from 1.78:1 to 2.55:1. Before I start watching the film I first find a good frame to pause the movie on that provides a strong contrast above and below the image. I then work the top and bottom masks into place. Once the masks are in place I kick it back and start the film from the beginning. Well worth the 2 minutes it takes to get the masks into position.


And now some details on how the masking works. I started by purchased a couple 12' boards wrapping them in black velvet. They're very lightweight and very straight.



At the ends of each board I threaded a screw through attaching a magnet. The combined height of the exposed screw and magnet provide the required clearance needed when it comes time to install the masks.



On the wall to the left and right of my screen frame at the top and bottom I attached a pair of 3' metal slats for holding each mask in place.



A small velvet drape is used on each side to hide the metal slats.



Each drape is hanging from a swinging arm (... a re-purposed gate cane bolt) that way I can just swing them out of the way if I even need to.



The masks straddle my projector screen frame with just enough clearance. My projector is ceiling mounted in the back of the room 21' from the screen. My primary seating is 15' from the screen. Despite the masks being an inch away from the screen material they still provide a very clean leading edge with no discernible shadow, infinitely adjustable down to the pixel row. Example shown below, just the masks without the skirting attached.



Attached to the back side of each mask is black velvet skirting which is removable. The skirt for the bottom mask just hangs. The skirting is attached to each mask with 3M cable clips (with adhesive backing) traditionally used for keeping computer ribbon cables organized. They're very low profile and fit the bill perfectly in this case.



The end of the skirting for the top mask is weighted and sits on top of the projector screen frame up against the wall. The small pocket at the end of the skirt holds a doubled up span of dowels rods. I made the span of dowel rods rigid enough that I can lift the entire length of skirting in one shot when picking it up from the center, hands spaced about 3 feet apart. This makes the skirting for the top mask very easy to manage.



The combined height of each mask and attached skirting provide for masking any given aspect ratio north of 1.78:1. Example shown below with the masks and skirting attached.



When not in use I position the masks above and below the screen as shown below. To move the masks I don't even need to pop them off the wall. I just slide them along the metal slats. Takes a couple minutes at most to mask down the image and even less time when moving the masks back above and below the screen. Easy peasy lemon squeezy.



I'd like to mask for 1.33:1 as well. I've got plenty of black velvet left. Going to try my hand next weekend at creating some masking panels that just friction fit on the left and right sides within my projector screen frame. The fun never ends!
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Very nice!


Better looking than most DIY attempts, and a excellent use of hardware to effect the look.
(...although it would be nicer still to see what your masked 16:9 image looks like...)



Just might wind up being a reference for true DIY'ers to use going forward.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I'm about to watch "The Bridge on the River Kwai" and decided to make a quick video demonstrating the process of moving each mask into place. The video is available via the first post of this thread. Enjoy!
 

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I really like this! What an elegant solution. I plan to follow your design. A couple questions for you:

Is the board sagging in a way that affects the masking line after a year of use? What thickness is it?

Where did you source quality magnets, and what size (maybe "pull force"?) are they?

What did you use for the metal slats?

Thanks in advance. This is really exactly what I needed.
 
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