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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I'm seriously considering painting my screen, but am having a tough time deciding on what to to do. I have a BQ 7700 that I run on eco mode(880 lumens) at about 13' away. Going for about a 110" screen. I have it in my living room. Light colored walls and ceiling, light blinds etc... Right now its projecting onto the beige painted wall and the pictures pretty dark. per projector central's calculation I should have a screen with a gain of 1.3. I also plan on painting on MDF board from HD, Originally I was set on Behr Silverscreen but after reading numerous threads I got even more confused. Anyone have any suggestions as to what I should use?
 

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Hi bboulan,


If you are looking for a simple direct answer as to the best screen for your situation and equipment, it ain't gonna happen. The situation is more complicated than that. There are also multiple schools of thought as to what makes the best performing screen.


The two main reasons we all aren't using a white screen are "projector black levels" and "ambient light".


The first problem is where the black areas of the image appear gray instead of black even when the PJ is properly calibrated. The answer to that problem is to use a gray screen, the darker gray the screen is the darker black blacks will be, but your PJ must have enough brightness to compensate for the loss of light returned from the screen compared to a white screen. Nothing is free in this game.


The second problem is that "ambient light", which is any light hitting the screen during viewing except what is coming directly from the PJ lens, is causing a loss of image contrast and color saturation. Again, a darker screen is the answer. If your walls and ceiling are light enough colors you could have an ambient light problem even with no other lights on in the room - the light bouncing off the walls/ceiling and back onto the screen could result in lose of image quality.


With a screen illumination of around 11 fL., and allowing for lamp dimming due to use, I would recommend a screen in the N9 to N8.5 range.


The simplest way to go is with a neutral gray paint in the desired shade using either Valspar Ultra Premium Enamel flat or Behr #1850 (from Lowe's and Home Depot respectively). This will make a good screen. If you want a bit more performance at additional cost and labor then continue reading.



Some think that adding Minwax Polycrylic Satin in amounts up to 25% of the mix to a neutral paint aids both final appearance and getting a smooth finish. I have not tried this myself so I can't comment on it.


Another group here thinks that screen mixes heavy in mica-based paints and poly are the ticket. They haven't worked for me.


Yet another group thinks that aluminum, aluminized polyester flake or mica-based paints in lesser amounts and/or controlled with other ingredients are the best way to go for a screen mix. I happen to fall in this category simply because these mixes have worked the best of me. These mixes are Black Widow (at N7.5 it is a bit too dark for your situation) and Cream&Sugar (an N9 mix). It is possible to mix these two together to get any shade of gray (the N level) between N7.5 and N9. These mixes are called Scorpion N8 and Scorpion N8.5 since there is really no reason to try and get intermediate shades.


As far as gain goes, I personally think people make to much out of it, and it is misunderstood by many. The higher the gain is over 1.0 the smaller the viewing cone will be for that screen. This is simple physics and law of reflection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for all the info. I think I'm gonna go with the Scorpion N8.5. What have you found to be the most effective material to paint on? Do I need to lay down primer? specific primer? This is rolled on right? Sorry to bombard you with so many questions. I do appreciate it
 

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..........as there exist other options, some of which are not nearly so low on the "gain" scale, nor need to sacrifice deeper perceived Black levels to be able to maintain a respectable white balance.


You said your PJ was in a Living Room? You have light colored Walls & Ceiling? Then you had better take note that considering a N8.5 application is a wrongful consideration, and one that will effectively work against image quality when ambient light and/or reflection off those light colored surfaces are brought into the viewing equation.


Despite previous commentary to the opposite, Gain is an important factor. And if a application is well designed, viewing angle is not as much as a level of concern as stated. If gain can be directed at more and different angles than otherwise seen in applications whose methods direct such gain more forward, the overall effective distribution of such gain is achieved, increasing viewing cone over dissimilar applications. As some who might not have been able to achieve such despite a constant effort to mitigate the failings of previous applications might be quick to discount it's relevance, those who have managed to do so can attest to it's value.


For instance, Silver Fire has a Gain of 1.2, yet manages to do so while maintaining a darker shade more akin to N7.5 Viewing Angle, and the degree of "Half gain" seen at such "extreme" angles is so slightly affected, that for all intents and purposes, there is no real need to even bring up it's mention.


Those comments above about "Mica based' paints are founded in preference of use (...or non-use...) not actual use and/or direct comparison via the same, and simply because one person states, "They haven't worked for me..." does not imply they have not worked for "Hundreds" of others.


Statements recently posted by the same source above about "Pushing Blue or Green" are based on a formula for Silver Fire that was/is over 4 years old, and more so, involved instances where mixing was less than accurately done, but whose error could be, and was easily adjusted. To my knowledge (..and I was there...) no one was ever left uncorrected or dissatisfied. Somehow that never seems to get mentioned though...



It was also stated you cannot get a straight answer...yet somehow you received exactly that at the end. All that was simply a lead in to what amounts to a stated preference, albeit cloaked vaguely as a "suggestion".


Here are some truly straight answers. And one based upon many proven and actual examples of performance seen under very adverse Ambient Light conditions, poor Room surface Colors, and PJs that have less lumens that you have to deal with.


Silver Fire is far and away the best application to choose if AMBIENT LIGHT and ADVERSE Room Colors are present to work against the viewing quality of the image under such conditions.


You need a Silver fire screen, with a Base/1.5 oz Colorant mix painted over Primed MDF. You can/should spray, but if you use a 9" 3/16" nap roller and some degree of care, rolling on two effective coats will allow the White base coat of primer to assist the Silver Fire at being even more effective at maintaining brilliant and accurate Whites. Colors though are never an issue as the Primaries within the Colorant mix, combined with their suspension within Water/ Polyurethane, and the additional reflective boost of the Silver / Pearlescent Mica, always make them "PoP" and "SiZZle".


That "horrid' Mica in the SF Mixes allows for a far greater degree of reflective assistance than any other similar yet dissimilar application that does not employ it, or uses smaller amount of such in an attempt to help boost gain where there is none.


Silver Fire is easily adjustable all the way from a very dark N6.5 up to a N9.0 range, simply by altering the amount of Dark "Neutral Gray" Colorant added to a very reflective base. That Colorant, consisting of 4 distinct Primary Colors, creates the "Gray" not a interaction between two elements, one a Beige base that needs the mixing of a "specific amount" of metallic aluminum to create such a narrow shade range between 7.5 - 8.0 maximum.


Silver Fire is not altogether much more complex or difficult a mix to assemble, especially when compared to the referenced Scorpion. As time as shown, to be able to comply with the obvious needs of more DIY'ers, the complexity of the make-up of the BW Family's lighter shaded offerings is getting more and more similar to that of Silver Fire.


But they still cannot effectively deliver the performance, because to get to gain figures that would effectively allow for their use with lower lumen PJs, they have to sacrifice ambient light performance as well. An application that demands that you utilize a shade that will not detract from the "image pop" as a bulb ages isn't going to perform nearly as well under ambient light conditions even when the Bulb is brand new.


But a application that can deliver Ambient light performance AND impressive White/ and Colors at the same time will always do better across the scale of luminosity presented as a Bulb ages. That, and since you will eventually upgrade to a new PJ, and that PJ will undoubtedly be of even higher Lumens, to make a screen designed to simply compensate for the failings of your current PJ is not advisable, and is not practical.


My straight answers are based on much actual experience, over a great many different situations,(...as in "hundreds"...) not merely bench testing or a single reference example, and they do not purport to attempt to convince anyone of anything more than the correct way to go about the effecting of a optimal viewing platform.


It's this way...and only this way. If you want something affordable, something that performs ABOVE expectations, something that is adaptable to changing situations and equipment, and something that can be done with a minimum of effort commensurate to achieving all of the above....then you should strongly consider Silver Fire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I researched the Silver Fire on some previous threads and I see you and others painted on acrylic mirror. This can be applied straight to MDF as well? I found a mixture for it that was posted in '06. What is the mixture for the current SF?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bboulan /forum/post/16930018


I researched the Silver Fire on some previous threads and I see you and others painted on acrylic mirror. This can be applied straight to MDF as well? I found a mixture for it that was posted in '06. What is the mixture for the current SF?

The application of Silver Fire onto a Mirror is an excellent way to acheive the maximum reflective boost from reclaiming a very high percentage of the projected light that absorbs into the surface paint. In the ansobing, attenuation occurs, and when the emerging light is collected and reflected by the Mirror, it is further attenuated before it is rebounded and "re-Fused" with the topmost image on the viewing side.


When one needs the absolute MOST Ambient Light viewing assistance from a darker Gray surface, and OR the most effective boost to one's perceived Contrast over that which the PJ itself can deliver on a matte white surface, the use of a Mirror is essential.


But in all cases, a smooth substrate painted with a flat white primer...or a Flat White Enamel (...even better...), or a White Coated hardboard (...even easier!) will...when coated with the appropriate shade of Silver Fire....deliver superior performance in most every respect to that of any other specified or chosen shade of Gray.


There are things to be considered, and things that must be done, some of which are in addition to, or the exclusion of methods and materials other DIY applications need/require/omit, but in the end, you most assuredly get out of it all even more than what you put into it.


Below is a representation of the newest, most effective mixture for Silver Fire Colorant (...that is the only thing that has changed....) using Liquitex Primaries.


QUOTE=pb_maxxx;8924648]Materials available at Michaels Arts & Crafts or most any Artist Supply or Hobby Stores.


Last Updated: July 21st, 2009 Edition:



"SILVER FIRE"

* use 3 oz. of the 'color components' and add/mix it to the 'base & viscosity components'


(base components)

30 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Pearl #02601

15 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Silver Metallic #02603

10 oz. Behr Interior UPW Flat #1850 (or Exterior #4050)

6 oz. Folk Art - Champagne Metallic


(viscosity components)

24 oz. Minwax Polycrylic - Satin Finish @Michaels & Home Depot

16 oz. Distilled or Filtered water


(color components)

50 ml water to rinse the color pigments from the measuring utensils.

20 ml - Liquitex Basics - Naphthol Crimson - (PR170)

8 ml - Liquitex Basics - Phthalocyanine Green - (PG7)

5 ml - Liquitex Basics - Phthalocyanine Blue

5 ml - Liquitex Basics - Cadmium Yellow Deep Hue (PY 83)




-------------------------


Silver Fire - L (Lite)**


** use 2 oz. of the 'color components' and add/mix it to the 'base & viscosity components'


-------------------------


Silver Fire - SL (SuperLite)***


*** use 1.25 oz. of the 'color components' and add/mix it to the 'base & viscosity components'


-------------------------


"SILVER FIRE HG" (High Gain)****


(base components)

36 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Pearl #02601

12 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Silver Metallic #02603

8 oz. Folk Art - Champagne Metallic

7 oz. Behr Interior UPW Flat #1050 (or Exterior #4050)


(viscosity components)

same as above


(color components)

same as above


**** use only .75oz of color components.


----------


These are some suggested measurement utensils....

They are from kitchen aid... the measurements are 15ml, 7.4ml, 5ml, 2.5ml, and 1.25ml.

using a straight edge to level of the top... it's very easy to get precisely the exact measurement every time...






----------Even easier is to increase the amounts by 40x and use full tubes of the primaries....but you then have to find a bunch of other perple to shae the SF-Love with.



here's any example of how the color components and completed mix should look.




On the left is the 'color components' before it's added.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan /forum/post/16930332


The application of Silver Fire onto a Mirror is an excellent way to acheive the maximum reflective boost from reclaiming a very high percentage of the projected light that absorbs into the surface paint. In the ansobing, attenuation occurs, and when the emerging light is collected and reflected by the Mirror, it is further attenuated before it is rebounded and "re-Fused" with the topmost image on the viewing side.


When one needs the absolute MOST Ambient Light viewing assistance from a darker Gray surface, and OR the most effective boost to one's perceived Contrast over that which the PJ itself can deliver on a matte white surface, the use of a Mirror is essential.


But in all cases, a smooth substrate painted with a flat white primer...or a Flat White Enamel (...even better...), or a White Coated hardboard (...even easier!) will...when coated with the appropriate shade of Silver Fire....deliver superior performance in most every respect to that of any other specified or chosen shade of Gray.


There are things to be considered, and things that must be done, some of which are in addition to, or the exclusion of methods and materials other DIY applications need/require/omit, but in the end, you most assuredly get out of it all even more than what you put into it.


Below is a representation of the newest, most effective mixture for Silver Fire Colorant (...that is the only thing that has changed....) using Liquitex Primaries.


QUOTE=pb_maxxx;8924648]Materials available at Michaels Arts & Crafts or most any Artist Supply or Hobby Stores.


Last Updated: July 21st, 2009 Edition:



"SILVER FIRE"

* use 3 oz. of the 'color components' and add/mix it to the 'base & viscosity components'


(base components)

30 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Pearl #02601

15 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Silver Metallic #02603

10 oz. Behr Interior UPW Flat #1850 (or Exterior #4050)

6 oz. Folk Art - Champagne Metallic


(viscosity components)

24 oz. Minwax Polycrylic - Satin Finish @Michaels & Home Depot

16 oz. Distilled or Filtered water


(color components)

50 ml water to rinse the color pigments from the measuring utensils.

20 ml - Liquitex Basics - Naphthol Crimson - (PR170)

8 ml - Liquitex Basics - Phthalocyanine Green - (PG7)

5 ml - Liquitex Basics - Phthalocyanine Blue

5 ml - Liquitex Basics - Cadmium Yellow Deep Hue (PY 83)




-------------------------


Silver Fire - L (Lite)**


** use 2 oz. of the 'color components' and add/mix it to the 'base & viscosity components'


-------------------------


Silver Fire - SL (SuperLite)***


*** use 1.25 oz. of the 'color components' and add/mix it to the 'base & viscosity components'


-------------------------


"SILVER FIRE HG" (High Gain)****


(base components)

36 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Pearl #02601

12 oz. Delta Ceramcoat Silver Metallic #02603

8 oz. Folk Art - Champagne Metallic

7 oz. Behr Interior UPW Flat #1050 (or Exterior #4050)


(viscosity components)

same as above


(color components)

same as above


**** use only .75oz of color components.


----------


These are some suggested measurement utensils....

They are from kitchen aid... the measurements are 15ml, 7.4ml, 5ml, 2.5ml, and 1.25ml.

using a straight edge to level of the top... it's very easy to get precisely the exact measurement every time...






----------Even easier is to increase the amounts by 40x and use full tubes of the primaries....but you then have to find a bunch of other perple to shae the SF-Love with.



here's any example of how the color components and completed mix should look.




On the left is the 'color components' before it's added.


Okay. I have some clarification questions...I mix the base and viscosity components in 1 bucket, then the color components in another(the 50 ml of water isn't added, thats just to rinse utensils right?) Pull 1.5oz of the color component and mix in the bucket of base components then I'm ready to apply to desired material...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bboulan /forum/post/16928599


Thanks for all the info. I think I'm gonna go with the Scorpion N8.5. What have you found to be the most effective material to paint on? Do I need to lay down primer? specific primer? This is rolled on right? Sorry to bombard you with so many questions. I do appreciate it

You are welcome. See, I told you you wouldn't get a simple direct answer.
It's now two and counting.



The substrate you use for your screen should be as smooth as possible, within reason, since surface texture can be a problem with any mix that has gain over a flat paint. The more gain from metallics in the mix, or gloss, the more surface texture can become apparent in the final screen.


Personally, I have always used tempered hardboard as a screen substrate, but others have used black out cloth, drywall and many others and gotten good results.


One of the cheapest smooth surfaces you can get is melamine-coated sheet-goods. TWH (Thrifty White Hardboard) is such a product based on coating 1/8 inch hardboard with melamine on one side. I'm sure you could get MDF coated with melamine too, but I don't recommend you do so since any paint that I have applied to it (melamine) can be scratched off fairly easily with a fingernail, something I can't do to painted primed hardboard. Paint doesn't just fall off melamine, but it would be more prone to damage than other surfaces. Like some have suggested, "just don't scratch it!".



You mentioned using MDF; as with all sheet-goods, carefully inspect your prospective sheet for damage, but also check the sheet for waviness which has been a problem noticed by some users. In the end, the waviness didn't affect screen appearance or performance as a screen, but it did look a little odd when seen at oblique angles in reflected sunlight when not in use as a screen.


For primer, I like to use Kilz Premium, or Kilz2; but about any white primer will work. Kilz Premium is a bit whiter than Kilz2 and it blocks stains and covers better than Kilz2, but don't buy it if you already have another white primer.


I highly recommend using a white primer before applying any screen mix. The whiteness of the primer gives a good flat reflective undercoat, seals the substrate and provides a good "grippy" surface for the screen mix to adhere to.


Yes, the primer and the Scorpion mixes can be rolled on.
 

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bboulan;


yes and no...


you do mix the base and viscosity components in one bucket and the color components in a separate container.


the 50ml of water IS added...and that's because you are working with such small amounts... quite of bit of color will be left on your measuring utensils and you'll need the water to help rinse that color from utensils and into your container of color mix. secondly, it'll help you handmix the components together.


i use a small 8-12oz rubbermaid container with sealed twist top... so that i can shake/mix the color components for 10 minutes after i hand stir them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Okay. So I'm going to round up all the materials for the SilverFire during the course of this week then tackle it this weekend. Any suggestions on a sprayer I should purchase. I will be doing this outside or in my garage. I really would prefer to roll as I don't have much experience spraying, but figure I should give it a shot. So would I spray it with the MDF on its back or standing up? From prev thread, 2 dust coats, then 2 full coats. Right? I will also be priming before hand. How long do I wait between each coat? Thanks for everything. Also any tips/pointers would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bboulan /forum/post/16942839


Okay. So I'm going to round up all the materials for the SilverFire during the course of this week then tackle it this weekend. Any suggestions on a sprayer I should purchase. I will be doing this outside or in my garage. I really would prefer to roll as I don't have much experience spraying, but figure I should give it a shot. So would I spray it with the MDF on its back or standing up? From prev thread, 2 dust coats, then 2 full coats. Right? I will also be priming before hand. How long do I wait between each coat? Thanks for everything. Also any tips/pointers would be greatly appreciated!

I'm not sure what mix you are going with, but primers and the Scorpion mixes don't need to be sprayed, and if sprayed they don't need "duster" coats.


If you choose to spray and go shopping for a spray gun, I would definitely recommend a HVLP system (High Volume Low Pressure) of some kind. A conventional high pressure gun will have problems spraying even thinned latex paint and there is so much over-spray everything in your garage would have paint on it. High pressure guns are also very inefficient, the standard ratio I keep seeing for them is 70%/30% which means 70% of the paint that goes out the nozzle is wasted. The paint particles are moving so fast (high pressure) that they bounce off the item being sprayed and go into the air. HVLP guns do not atomize paint as fine as high pressure guns, but the efficiency numbers are literally reversed with only 30% paint wasted, and I've seen that as low as 20% for some guns.


Assuming you don't already have an air-compressor, you should look into getting a Wagner electric HVLP gun, the Wagner CS is a favorite and highly spoken of on the DIY screen forums.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bboulan /forum/post/16942839


Okay. So I'm going to round up all the materials for the SilverFire during the course of this week then tackle it this weekend. Any suggestions on a sprayer I should purchase.





Home Depot now has the "Wagner Control Spray Double Duty" on sale for $69.95.



Quote:
I will be doing this outside or in my garage. I really would prefer to roll as I don't have much experience spraying, but figure I should give it a shot.

Ya figur'd rightly. Spraying with the wagner is so very easy....far faster....and delivers a perfect surface more readily than any Rolling effort can. A really good painter, using paint he's familar with, and a technique that comes to him like inhaling can get a ultra smooth surface similar to that of the Wagner's.........but at a great deal of "experienced" effort.


Besides, Silver Fire was ideally made for spraying. Yet using Finish rollers, and a Dry-roller back stroke technique at the end of each full coating, you can get something close enough to what the Wagner can produce in a SNAP!


I was very excited and happy for Screen DIY'ers everywhere when the cost and performance aspects of spraying became so close to that of Rolling. Yes....the Wagster is a bit more overall than most collection of Rolling supplies would run, but golly...the time saved, the lack of real experience needed....and the perfection of most all resulting efforts mitigates the slight extra expense altogether.


And here's a bonus. The newer Control Spray Double Duty is SPECIFICALLY rated for both Indoor and Outdoor use due to an even more effective reduction in over spray.

Quote:
So would I spray it with the MDF on its back or standing up?

Spray it in a upright position, with backing around all edges that is at least 6" wide to allow for a generous overlap of the bottom / top edges, and a full "run-off' at each end as you drop 40% of your Patter's height before running back across the opposite way. Leveling out the edge prevents "vortex-ing" where less paint is deposited at the edge due to the turbulence cause by the lack of pressure resistance as the edge is encountered.


Quote:
From prev thread, 2 dust coats, then 2 full coats. Right? I will also be priming before hand. How long do I wait between each coat? Thanks for everything. Also any tips/pointers would be greatly appreciated!

Shoot 3 Water Thinned Coats of Primer w/ a 60% over lapp on each row. All coats done at a 14" distance, moving steadily and Straight across the surface at 2' per sec. (Dusting is 3'-4' per second )


No need to "Dust" with SF on top of Primer. Just go 2' per second at 14' and 60% over lap (40% drop down from last Row) Don't second guess coverage unless you trip and fall down. Just count on the next coat to even up any spot where you got below 50% over lap. Hold the Wagner's Cord to one side and away and slightly behind your Body/stepping path. That's really easy if you position your Body slightly turned right angle to the screen, opposite your Spraying Arm.


Oh yeah, focus on keeping the Gun both level and as close to the same disance from the screen as you can. Using the Wagner for Priming 3 coats is all the practice you'll need before "The Big Squirt".
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan /forum/post/16943098




Home Depot now has the "Wagner Control Spray Double Duty" on sale for $69.95.






Ya figur'd rightly. Spraying with the wagner is so very easy....far faster....and delivers a perfect surface more readily than any Rolling effort can. A really good painter, using paint he's familar with, and a technique that comes to him like inhaling can get a ultra smooth surface similar to that of the Wagner's.........but at a great deal of "experienced" effort.


Besides, Silver Fire was ideally made for spraying. Yet using Finish rollers, and a Dry-roller back stroke technique at the end of each full coating, you can get something close enough to what the Wagner can produce in a SNAP!


I was very excited and happy for Screen DIY'ers everywhere when the cost and performance aspects of spraying became so close to that of Rolling. Yes....the Wagster is a bit more overall than most collection of Rolling supplies would run, but golly...the time saved, the lack of real experience needed....and the perfection of most all resulting efforts mitigates the slight extra expense altogether.


And here's a bonus. The newer Control Spray Double Duty is SPECIFICALLY rated for both Indoor and Outdoor use due to an even more effective reduction in over spray.




Spray it in a upright position, with backing around all edges that is at least 6" wide to allow for a generous overlap of the bottom / top edges, and a full "run-off' at each end as you drop 40% of your Patter's height before running back across the opposite way. Leveling out the edge prevents "vortex-ing" where less paint is deposited at the edge due to the turbulence cause by the lack of pressure resistance as the edge is encountered.





Shoot 3 Water Thinned Coats of Primer w/ a 60% over lapp on each row. All coats done at a 14" distance, moving steadily and Straight across the surface at 2' per sec. (Dusting is 3'-4' per second )


No need to "Dust" with SF on top of Primer. Just go 2' per second at 14' and 60% over lap (40% drop down from last Row) Don't second guess coverage unless you trip and fall down. Just count on the next coat to even up any spot where you got below 50% over lap. Hold the Wagner's Cord to one side and away and slightly behind your Body/stepping path. That's really easy if you position your Body slightly turned right angle to the screen, opposite your Spraying Arm.


Oh yeah, focus on keeping the Gun both level and as close to the same disance from the screen as you can. Using the Wagner for Priming 3 coats is all the practice you'll need before "The Big Squirt".


So after the 3 primer coats, I just do 1 coat of the SF? And do you know of anywhere to get a sheet of MDF larger than 4X8?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bboulan /forum/post/16943753


So after the 3 primer coats, I just do 1 coat of the SF? And do you know of anywhere to get a sheet of MDF larger than 4X8?


No...do three coats of SF in the same manner you did the 3 Primer coats.

Only do a4th "Duster" if you see/feel the need to equalize out the screen's surface appearance (sheen or texture related) dusting always creates a equally distributed surface. You could "Dust" on 5-6 coats...or apply 2 Dusters and 2 normal coats...it's about all the same. the entire object is to lay down the necessary amount...no more than nor less than required, and do so as evenly as possible.


With the Wagner...after some practical Priming experience...you'll completely understand this.



Dedicated Lumber Supply Stores (...not HDs and Lowes....) can order it up....most will do so. Ot comes in 5' x 10' sheets. Do yourself a Favor though and ask for 1/2" material is at all possible. Either way, have another stout friend to help you handle it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
How do you think this would look to paint it directly on the wall w/o using a substrate? Thats just alot to be working with(MDF) I found a 5X10 at 3/4" which weighs about 120 lbs! The wall is textured and I'm not able to sand it down as it is a rental. Or other than MDF previously you said white covered hardboard would work well and I wouldn't need to Prime. I called around to all the local lumber stores and they can't get anything bigger than 4X8 so maybe I'm stuck using MDF...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bboulan /forum/post/16948993


How do you think this would look to paint it directly on the wall w/o using a substrate? Thats just alot to be working with(MDF) I found a 5X10 at 3/4" which weighs about 120 lbs! The wall is textured and I'm not able to sand it down as it is a rental. Or other than MDF previously you said white covered hardboard would work well and I wouldn't need to Prime. I called around to all the local lumber stores and they can't get anything bigger than 4X8 so maybe I'm stuck using MDF...

You can order the thinner MDF, I'm sure...and to my way of thinking (..and my Back's...) it would be worth waiting for to eliminate almost 1/3 your MDF's weight.


I cannot see how much texture you have, but the fact that you can say "It's Textured and I cannot sand it down" pretty much tells me it's got too much Texture to make a great Screen...or even a Good one.
 
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