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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 51s500 picture is fine during satelite broadcacts, but has the black lines at the top and bottom of the screen when viewing dvd's. I have the tv setting at 16x 9 and the sony ( I think it's the 735 ) dvdplayer's setting is also at 16x9. Is there a fix for my problem?

Thanks Jay
 

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The DVDs you're watching have a 2.35:1 aspect ratio. HDTV has a 1.78:1 aspect ratio which fills your screen. Since 2.35:1 is WIDER than 1.78:1, it has to be shrunk down. So, yes, it'll still have black bars and it won't be as big as they are on a 4x3 set. 1.85:1 movies will almost fill your screen too if your TV has a lot of overscan. Just deal with the black lines and watch the movie is the original aspect ratio. Zooming it will only cut the sides off and you'll be missing a chunk of the movie.
 

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Coyote Waits
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Ken is right and here is a little background that I keep around just for the fun of it.


Congratulations! You are the umpteenth reader I have subjected to the following:


Aspect Ratio: (Written referring to a 16*9 DLP TV)


If you are watching a movie then the aspect ratio will depend on the original film. Your TV will have a fixed aspect ratio of 16x9 (1.77:1) or 4*3 (1.33:1). Some movies are made to be displayed on a 1.77:1 theater screen. Those movies will fill your 16*9 TV screen when the display mode is set to normal. If you display the same film on a 4*3 TV there will have to be black bars at the top and bottom of the screen to preserve the movie's original aspect ratio.


The aspect ratio of a film like "Annie Hall" (1977) is 1.85:1 so it is a little wider than a 16*9 (1.77:1) TV screen. The only way to see a 1.85:1 film without stretching or cropping it is to leave small black bars at the top and bottom of the screen to make up for the fact that you are watching a film image 16 units wide by 8.6 units high on a screen 9 units high. The difference between 9 and 8.6 is so small that you may not even notice the black bars.


As the difference in the ratio of width to height increases the black bars at the top get bigger. "Moulin Rouge" (2001) has an aspect ratio of 2.35:1 or 16x6.8 so the black bars will be noticeable on your TV. The King And I" (1956) is 2.55:1 an even wider ratio.


In theaters they have screens big enough to display any film. They also have "black masking" that moves into place to hide the unused portion of the screen -- better black bars.


An older movie done in 4x3, which is what your older TV was patterned after, will have the black bars on the side if you view it on a 16x9 TV.


The stretch and zoom modes protect CRT based RPTVs from burn-in and keep those owners who feel cheated if any of their TV screen isn't used happy. You don't need to protect your DLP set so it's a matter of what you like best.
 
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