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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

I currently have a YAMAHA RX-V596 using optical in for audio and HDMI directly from the ps3 and computer to the TV.   I have been thinking about getting a new receiver for a while now that has HDMI inputs.  This receiver would be used for games, movies, and music.

 

I am concerned about delay in sound.  Right now if the sound is Dolby Digital or DTS encoded its sent out as plain 5 channel I believe.   There are options for concert, hall, movie theater, sports, etc and I have never used them.  I have been reading and thought that if the DSP is on there is a delay in sound for processing.  I understand that DD and DTS has to be decoded and could take some time, but not sure where the other effect modes come add time versus no effects.   I would really like to buy a receiver without any effect processing.  ( I have no idea who would want that )

 

My brother has a Pioneer receiver and I though he said the sub does not come on unless there is a surround sound mode selected.  On my current YAMAHA the sub is always sent a signal though the LFE out.   This seems to work correctly for any Dolby Digital, DTS, or stereo input.  I am not sure what to look for here.  I have read that the LFE does not mean sub which mostly makes sense.  I would assume that regardless of surround or stereo input the sub channel would be filtered correctly by the receiver.  Is this something to look for ?

 

What would be really cool is if I didnt have to select stereo or surround at all.  If the receiver got a stereo stream it would send it out to the front left and right, it got a surround stream it would send it to all.  My sub automatically turns on when it gets a signal and turns off after 10 minutes of no activity.  Would be really nice if the amplifier on each channel operated this way so i never had to tell it stereo or surround.  ( I would never use pro logic for old movies or what ever )

 

I have Boston Classic CS 2310 5.1 speaker setup.  Do any receivers allow for setting the cross over frequency ?  If so does this add any delay is sound processing ?

 

I am leaning toward another YAMAHA.  Wondering if there were any series or what to look out for.   Are there any other brands that I should consider ?

 

I am mostly a minimalist with quality sound.  I do not want the extra crap that most dont need or want ( like listening modes of concert or sports ).  Just plain surround or stereo that just works.
 

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Most modern receivers have a "Direct" setting which disables all processing and/or a "Game" mode which minimizes lag.


Bass management (and the accompanying crossover frequency adjustments) in a modern receiver requires digital processing. The only way to avoid that is to use a subwoofer which provides its own analog crossover for the speakers connected directly to the subwoofer.


FWIW, Pioneer receivers require you to set the same crossover frequency for all speakers. Most other brands of receivers allow separate settings for the center and each pair of left&right speakers. E.g. large front speakers can have a low crossover frequency, while small surrounds can have a higher one.


The processors in most brands of modern receivers provide automated room equalization. This has nothing to do with the funky room simulation modes provided by some brands. While the quality of your speakers and room acoustics have the most effect on the quality of the sound you hear, room equalization tries to produce a flat (i.e. accurate) reproduction of soundtracks in your room using your speakers. In most cases it can do a very good job of correcting for infelicities in speakers and the room.


Personally, I'm biased toward Denon and Marantz receivers, primarily because they provide a better equalization for the lowest frequencies and subwoofer than Pioneer and Yamaha do. Onkyo tends to have a poor reputation for reliability in their HDMI boards. Of course, there are other much more expensive brands, but I have the impression you'd rather spend less than $1K.
 

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to the OP, I think our styles are rather similar. I am movie watcher, sports, PS/PC gamer and I do concern myself with input lag and such. I have a Panasonic plasma hooked up to Marantz receiver that has HDMI inputs. I had an Onkyo before w/o HDMI. I used an HDMI selector and Optical inputs. Occasionally I would get delay between audio and picture. I have never seen that issue with Marantz.


I like to tell myself that an HDMI board on a receiver has better control of sound and video delay. I could be 100% wrong but I assumed since one device is the brain the audio delay problems were fixed. I never looked into that, so don't quote me. Someone feel free to correct me if I am wrong.


Video processing exists on my TV and my Receiver. The TV strangely seems to know when I am playing a game and when I am playing a movie. It flips my game mode on and off for me, and I guessed this was due to HDMI control and something my PS4 is doing. The receiver I've set to Game mode for the correct inputs as well. Game mode will remove processing and reduce input delay. I am not a competitive gamer (such as tourneys) but this setup gives me no issues.
 

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IMHO...

The delay is in the video not the audio..

Especially with games, the amount of processor resources for action video far exceeds those required for audio..

Therefore minimizing and/or eliminating certain video post-processing modes is the 1st step to minimize any video latency..



Just my $0.05... 👍😉
 
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