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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read every thread I can get my hands on about this topic. I'd love some additional thoughts before I go out to get contractor opinioins.


I live in Seattle, where it just doesn't get that hot. We live in a good-sized house (3100 sq ft) and typically just have all of the windows open all summer. Since it's almost always in the 60's or lower at night, that has worked well. Until now.


I recently converted my bonus room (2nd floor, above garage, below unfinished attic, approx 15x18 ft, with 12' vaulted ceiling) to a HT. The room has a huge (5x10') window on the west wall. Blackout curtains and wooden blinds together solve the light problem but not the heat. And the curtains block whatever airflow was formerly cooling the room. Even without solar load, the room temp rises about 5 to 7F per hour with the audio equipment and FP running. It's pretty toasty if you watch a movie and the extras!


So, I want to cool it. But how? We have forced-air gas heating so there is a furnace and duct work. I'd prefer something dedicated to the HT so that I'm not messing up the rest of the house. In the depths of winter (40F and raining) the HT room is still warm if the windows are closed, even without the FP on.


Any thoughts on dedicated HT cooling? The duct work goes down ito the garage I think, so it may be accessible.


Any help would be appreciated. And any contractor recommendations in the Puget Sound area would be most welcome.


...jeff (sweating in Seattle)
 

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Jeff,

you might want to check out a mini-split a/c system. They are very quiet and efficient. I just installed one in my converted garage/HT. Installation was fairly easy, I didit myself, on last saturday. It is amazingly quiet and cools the room to downright frigid here in Phoenix. BTW, very affordable...go here:
http://www.genieac.com/MINISPLITSALL.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
you might want to check out a mini-split a/c system. They are very quiet and efficient. I just installed one in my converted garage/HT. Installation was fairly easy, I didit myself, on last saturday. It is amazingly quiet and cools the room to downright frigid here in Phoenix.
Very interesting. How quiet is quiet, and which unit did you put in? Is it (for example) louder than your FP fan? Do you hear any additional noise when the compressor kicks in?


Also, what's the connection between inside and outside and do both units require power? Trying to get a sense for what it will be like to install the inside unit in the 2nd-floor HT and the outside unit downstairs at the side of the house if possible.
 

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Jeff,

I put in the 9300 btu unit, my room is 12x20x9high. At high fan speed i think it is rated at 40db, but after the room cools down(which is very quick) the fan drops to low and is rated at 28 db, it is quiter than most projector fans! The outside condensing/compressor unit is so quiet I had to go outside and put my hand to the fan to see if it was on, because I could not hear it thru the access hole I cut to run the copper thru. As far as power goes, you run a 20amp 110v circuit to the outside unit only, there are some inter-connecting wires that come back in to power the blower/evap unit mounted on the wall. The unit comes precharged for something like 15-25ft of copper. My unit had a 3/8" and 1/4" lines I got at HD. I used a flaring kit from harbor frieght(10 bucks) and a vacuum pump(also Harbor freight 20 bucks). basically, you mount the indoor unit to the wall and put the copper, drain, and electrical thru a 4" hole. flare your copper tubing and attach to the compressor, make your electrical connections. After that, I hooked up the vacuum pump, evecuated the lines and the opened the valve on the compressor to let the freon in. hit the cooling button ont the remote and Voila! instant gratification! Hope this helps!
 

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BTW, max height difference from indoor unit to outdoor unit is 26ft. max line length is 40ft, so it should work fine for a second story. It also is a heat pump so it can provide heat in the winter and it can also be used as a dehumidifier, not much use here in phoenix but might be useful for seattle!
 

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Also being in Seattle and knowing the climate...

I'd insulate the ceiling to R38 and put in an ultra-quiet Panasonic fan to suck air to the outside. Run the fan at night or when you are in the room and it will do the job 90% of the time. Of course this summer was HOT for Seattle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by lespurgeon
Also being in Seattle and knowing the climate...

I'd insulate the ceiling to R38 and put in an ultra-quiet Panasonic fan to suck air to the outside. Run the fan at night or when you are in the room and it will do the job 90% of the time. Of course this summer was HOT for Seattle.
If this works it would considerably less complex and expensive. Two questions:
  1. Is this a ceiling fan, wall fan, window fan? Not sure where you're recommending this goes.
  2. Is it better to exhaust hot air or pull in cool air? [/list=1] Thanks for the idea. Any suggestions on what type of fan, where to buy it, etc., wwould be appreciated.
 

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Seattle lighting has full range of Panasonic's quiet fans (primarily used for bathrooms). They have in wall and ceiling mounted verisons. I believe there is another good option available from a company called "fantech" whereby the exhaust fan is mounted remotely. There is a ductwork/hvac place on Stone Way over inWallingford that carries their stuff. I'm just building my Seattle ht in basement, and just discussed this issue with my builder today.

My concern is that heat buildup will be substantial with all of my equipment and potentially 4-5 humans in room, no a/c in basement. I'm currently planning on installing a fan or two above grade, and above/next to equipment rack, but was leaning towards using 120mm 12volt fans normally used in

computer cases.

good luck

tor
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
lespurgeon, torj -- thanks for the great advice. I didn't even think of using a standard ceiling exhaust fan. I'm looking at the Panasonic WhisperCeiling series now.


Anyone know the conversion factor for sones to dB? I don't know if "2 sones" is a little or a lot.
 

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The Panasonic fan I installed in my bathroom is very quiet, but not

inaudible. If I recall correctly they have at least one model with

different speed settings. That is the one that I would pick for ht application. After ruminating about my setup that is what I'm now

leaning towards, rather than a wall mounted option, in order to

take maximum advantage of natural convection as well..

(mounted above my equipment rack)

let me know how it works out

tor
 
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