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If you had an opportunity to buy an Sencore VP403 for $x and a Quantumdata 802BT for $x+150 which would you get and why? I know it's going to be subjective, but I would like to get some opinions.


Thanks!
 

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My vote is for the QD 802BT. I have owned both units, and I still own the QD, but I sold off the VP403. My QD 802BT has the HDMI output option; I am not sure if the DVI option will behave the same or not.

They both output all the resolutions and signal types you should need, though I'm not sure if the VP403 can do 1080P/60.

My VP403's ATSC output was not accurate at all. After finding huge discrepancies with it, I quit using it.

I found the VP403's RGB colorspace output very limiting with some displays. About 5% or so of the TVs I calibrate mishandle RGB or YCbCr colorspace via HDMI, and with those TVs you need to be able to switch between the two in order to diagnose and overcome the problem. If it weren't for that, I probably would have been satisfied with it.


Quantum Data 802BT


advantages:
  • with HDMI output, can freely switch between RGB and YCbCr 4:4:4 or 4:2:2 color space (extremely important with some TVs that mishandle one or the other)
  • can make custom test patterns, and I've made many including 3D patterns and APL patterns

disadvantages:
  • bigger and heavier
  • not battery powered
  • slower drawing some of the more complex test patterns
 

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Signal generators with DVI outputs (used with an adapter that converts DVI to HDMI) typically will not be able to send the identifying code to the video display that causes the video display to switch to YCbCr mode. You set one of these generators to YCbCr and it SENDS YCbCr, but the TV (via the HDMI interface) never "sees" the code that tells the TV to switch to YCbCr mode and most TVs will default to RGB mode. When this happens you get completely whacked color with little or no blue and electric shades of red, green and magenta replacing most colors. Since consumer video sources are natively YCbCr it tends to be best to keep video in YCbCr format and calibrate in YCbCr format. There is no guarantee that an RGB calibration and a YCbCr calibration will be identical - many times they are, but there are TVs that don't measure the same in YCbCr mode vs RGB mode. Anyway... if I was getting a signal generator today to use on TVs with HDMI interfaces, any generator that didn't have a "real" HDMI interface that would reliably switch video displays between YCbCr and RGB modes would be automatically out of contention. So that means generators based on DVI (either a DVI interface on the outside with a DVI-to-HDMI adapter OR internal DVI with an HDMI connector on the outside... a 'fake' HDMI interface). That pretty much means any of the newer video signal generators that did not exist at the time DVI interfaces appeared. The Accupel 5000 (earlier models were DVI), the newer QDs, the AV Foundry Video Forge, and a couple of others mentioned in this thread.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn /forum/post/20832858


Signal generators with DVI outputs (used with an adapter that converts DVI to HDMI) typically will not be able to send the identifying code to the video display that causes the video display to switch to YCbCr mode. You set one of these generators to YCbCr and it SENDS YCbCr, but the TV (via the HDMI interface) never "sees" the code that tells the TV to switch to YCbCr mode and most TVs will default to RGB mode. When this happens you get completely whacked color with little or no blue and electric shades of red, green and magenta replacing most colors. Since consumer video sources are natively YCbCr it tends to be best to keep video in YCbCr format and calibrate in YCbCr format. There is no guarantee that an RGB calibration and a YCbCr calibration will be identical - many times they are, but there are TVs that don't measure the same in YCbCr mode vs RGB mode. Anyway... if I was getting a signal generator today to use on TVs with HDMI interfaces, any generator that didn't have a "real" HDMI interface that would reliably switch video displays between YCbCr and RGB modes would be automatically out of contention. So that means generators based on DVI (either a DVI interface on the outside with a DVI-to-HDMI adapter OR internal DVI with an HDMI connector on the outside... a 'fake' HDMI interface). That pretty much means any of the newer video signal generators that did not exist at the time DVI interfaces appeared. The Accupel 5000 (earlier models were DVI), the newer QDs, the AV Foundry Video Forge, and a couple of others mentioned in this thread.

I agree wholeheartedly, and I will add that the 802BT w/HDMI is a "real" HDMI output.
 
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