AVS Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Up until now I have run all of my connected devices off of my wireless router. Now I would like to get into a gigabit switched network.


Should I have a single central switch that all devices connect to (forcing me to potentially run more wire to locations in the future) or should I have several switches throughout the house (having the server/Xbox/Logitech Revue player plug into one switch, the bluray player/DSM extender into another, and the htpc/wireless router into a third)?


For expandability it seems multiple switches would be easier, but I am looking for the best solution in terms of "just working" once set up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,704 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by LexInVA /forum/post/20861648


You need to look at Powerline Networking. That is as easy as it gets.

. . . until you run into wiring issues, split circuits, line interference, etc..


When it works it works well, when it doesn't it doesn't and there won't be anything you can do about it. And it often doesn't.


But it's often worth trying. You'll know right away whether it's going to work in your situation or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
what i did for expansion was put a little 5 port gigabit switch in my media closet or in each location that needed expansion. It was a hell of a lot easier than running wires back to a central location. There was no difference in speed and it was done in minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,131 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 /forum/post/20861622


Should I have a single central switch that all devices connect to (forcing me to potentially run more wire to locations in the future) or should I have several switches throughout the house (having the server/Xbox/Logitech Revue player plug into one switch, the bluray player/DSM extender into another, and the htpc/wireless router into a third)?

That would be ideal, that will ensure each device gets the full Gigabit capability to any other device on the network. If you daisy chain switches you can run into situations where two (or more) devices feed into one switch, and must then both/all share a single gig-E link to another switch, thus reducing each's available bandwidth.


That said, in practice, with gig-E, realistic bandwidth demands, and the fact that many streamer/game console/sandalone type devices only support 100Mbps these days anyway, it's unlikely you'd run into an issue.


What I'd probably do is run direct gig-E everywhere practical. And then if at some point in the future you need extra ports in a room, and it's difficult to pull another run, just stick a switch in there and don't worry about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,567 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 /forum/post/20861693


. . . until you run into wiring issues, split circuits, line interference, etc..


When it works it works well, when it doesn't it doesn't and there won't be anything you can do about it. And it often doesn't.


But it's often worth trying. You'll know right away whether it's going to work in your situation or not.

It works fine for most people and I've never had any complaints from anyone I've sold the stuff to nor have I had any problems with my own network which is now completely Powerline Ethernet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,704 Posts
It works fine for many people in many locations. And for others it doesn't. "Most" is an exaggeration.


I used if for a long time for one location in my house where it worked fine. Another location where I wanted to use it, it didn't work at all. Different circuits, different results.


My experience is far from unusual. You can find plenty of discussion on this forum and other places reflecting this reality.


Ethernet over coax is actually a better solution in many situations unless you are trying to multiplex it along with satellite, in which case it won't work. But with cable or antenna or empty coax, it's a good appoach.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
934 Posts
Here's what I do.....


I have 10 GigE drops going down to my basement (one in each room) going to a single GigE switch. Then, in some rooms like the basement play area and TV room, where I have multiple 100Mb/s stuff (like sagetv, xbox) I have a tiny 4-5 port switch connected to the wall GigE (which is connected to the main switch). Each low bandwidth thing is connected to the tiny switch and life is good.


stanger89 explains why this is good enough....
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top