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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a Marantz SR5003 AV Reciever, a CD5003 CD player and a set of 5.1 speakers/sub.


Been playing around with it for a couple of weeks and been wondering about a few things.


1. Currently the CD player is connected to the Reciever with a coax cable, but ive been wondering if im even using the CD players DAC this way?


Would it be better to buy a quality Stereo RCA cable?



2. Turning the speakers off in the reciever and playing around with some sinus waves i discovered my sub still plays say a 300 hz sinus wave.


This happens even tho my crossover is set to 120hz and set to max on sub (200hz) audyssey calibrated.


Is it supposed to play like that? i thought all above 120hz was supposed to be blocked by the reciever?


In general im finding my sub fairly locatable and im starting to wonder if something is completly wrong here.



3. On the back of my sub theres a dial called bass boost, so far i have just left it turned all the way down. Im wondering what this does and if its something i can tweak for better sub performance?
 

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#1 Depends. ( don't you love that) which unit has the better DAC. I would stick with the digital out.

#2 Yes, the crossover is not a brick wall. It decreases by 12 or 18 dB per octave, so even though it is set to 120, at 240 it is only 12 or 18 dB down, and so on.

#3 Yes, it is there for tweaking. exactly. In your question, you did not make any comment on if you are pleased with the sound. That is , after all the goal. Old saying: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it"


Comment: 120 is very high for a sub crossover. If your mains have bigger than 4 inch drivers, lower the crossovers to 80. Set the AVR and sub crossover at the same point, 120 or 80. This could help all of the issues you are thinking about. Worth a try and see which you prefer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well im not really totally satisfied yet, gunshots, explosions etc. lack some oomph to them.

And also the sub seems locatable once in a while.


the speakers are small 2x 3.5 inch + dome tweeter with no ports, and a 10" inch closed downward firing sub.


i read it was a bad idea to use both the crossover on sub and reciever. so audyssey recommends to turn up the sub crossover to max and have the reciever control it.


also setting the reciever lpf/hpf crossover any lower than 120 can remove content from the lfe track in movies?


for my system audyssey detects and sets lpf/hpf on the reciever to 120 hz. is this really why the sub is so locateable.


i guess it makes sense if it still plays 300 hz at audible levels.
 

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120hz is the threshold where the human ear can detect direction from sound. Some people can hear directional sounds lower - some can't. It is a good starting point when setting a sub up with small speakers such as you have. Its also where your AVR has set the cutoff point to the sub. This does not mean nothing above 120hz does not go to the sub - just that full db levels are delivered to it to that point. The cutoff is a slope and works for the speakers and the sub so that each deliver the 'middle' ground - so to speak, perhaps the sub is audible to 150hz or so. That would be very directional to most everyone.


The best suggestion I can give you is to get speakers with a fuller range to prevent directional sound from being delivered to the sub.


What you have is a sub that struggles to reproduce anything above 120hz and speakers that struggle to get low enough to reproduce sound to 120hz. In other words - you may have a gap - especially if you change the sub to a lower frequency cutoff - or increase the speaker cutoff.


Get larger speakers and that oomph will return. And the rest of the problems you are having will be mitigated or entirely gone depending on the range of the speakers.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knucklehead90 /forum/post/16891987


120hz is the threshold where the human ear can detect direction from sound. Some people can hear directional sounds lower - some can't. It is a good starting point when setting a sub up with small speakers such as you have. Its also where your AVR has set the cutoff point to the sub. This does not mean nothing above 120hz does not go to the sub - just that full db levels are delivered to it to that point. The cutoff is a slope and works for the speakers and the sub so that each deliver the 'middle' ground - so to speak, perhaps the sub is audible to 150hz or so. That would be very directional to most everyone.


The best suggestion I can give you is to get speakers with a fuller range to prevent directional sound from being delivered to the sub.


What you have is a sub that struggles to reproduce anything above 120hz and speakers that struggle to get low enough to reproduce sound to 120hz. In other words - you may have a gap - especially if you change the sub to a lower frequency cutoff - or increase the speaker cutoff.


Get larger speakers and that oomph will return. And the rest of the problems you are having will be mitigated or entirely gone depending on the range of the speakers.


120 to 100, correct, but remember the crossover is not a brick wall, so you hear a lot of output way above the crossover such that localization is common. Even my 4th order, I can localize the subs with noise if the f3 is above 60 at "normal" levels. Sine wave, no way; you are quite right. Putting the sub as close as possible to one of the mains will help reduce localization.


You are asking a very light weight system to do heavyweight work. A 6 & 1/2 mid/woofer is about the least piston area that will have oomph. A pair of 12" subs, or more for bass. Physics is hard to fight.
 
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