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I am looking at setting up a simple 5.1 home theater in my finished basement. The back speakers won't be very far from the receiver but the way that I have to run the wires it could take a lot of wire. At what distance do you start to see a loss of quality when running speaker wire?


Also another question, when mounting the center channel speaker, is it better to mount it above or below the TV? Or does really depend on how high the TV is mounted (mine is mounted on the wall.) If I was to put the speaker above the TV it would be a lot higher then head level, and if I put it below the tv it would be at just below or right at head level.


Thanks for all the help.
 

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Depends on how perceptive you are.



The general rule of thumb is to keep speaker wire resistance
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vandiyan /forum/post/15422443


I am looking at setting up a simple 5.1 home theater in my finished basement. The back speakers won't be very far from the receiver but the way that I have to run the wires it could take a lot of wire. At what distance do you start to see a loss of quality when running speaker wire?

If you follow the rule, longer wire, thicker wire, then quality loss might set in over 1,000 feet. Any speaker wire over 25 feet probably wants to be 12 gauge.

Quote:
Also another question, when mounting the center channel speaker, is it better to mount it above or below the TV?

Whatever sounds best. Impossible to predict. Last system I heard sounded amazing with the center channel above the screen. In fact all the speakers were soffit mounted, which can really work particularly if you have a good equalizer to match the speakers and their location to the room.

Quote:
Or does really depend on how high the TV is mounted (mine is mounted on the wall.) If I was to put the speaker above the TV it would be a lot higher then head level, and if I put it below the tv it would be at just below or right at head level.

That too. Rule of thumb is that non-floor-standing speakers probably have the best chance to sound good if mounted at ear level or pointed at the listener's ears or "sweet spot" if not at ear level.
 

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There seems to be a "rule" of thumb around here...


Just buy 12 gauge and be happy.



I don't necessarily subscribe to that, but while it might be overkill for some situations, the cost isn't excessive. And 14 gauge can be downright cheap if you get it from the right place. If you're really on a budget, I can see using 16 gauge, but for most of you who are doing their own basements for a semi-permanent install, I don't see the point of saving 2-digit $ worth of cable by going with 16 gauge, if it's a relatively long run.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vandiyan /forum/post/15422653


Thanks for the quick responses. So is it pretty safe to say that if I am running about 50ft of wire I shouldn't see a problem as long as I use the correct gauge. Which seems to be 12.

For fun, try the Speaker Calculator on here . You'll see how much db loss you'll get with different combinations of length, gauge, etc. Loss less than 1 db is not audible. And let's say, for argument sake, you use a small gauge and loss is 1 db. It's not the end of the world... to correct it you'd just boost the channel trim on the receiver by 1 db. Not ideal, but it corrects the situation.


I used 16 gauge in my walls for my rear surrounds (7.1) when I built this last house, and runs are 55'. Speakers are 8 ohms, and I am losing 1/2 db. I should have used 14 gauge because there is a chance that I may have 4 ohm speakers there in the future (doubtful, but possible).


You only need 14 gauge... but 12 will work too.


-T
 
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