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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It is getting near time to replace my main system amplifier. I am wondering if there is a benefit to purchasing monoblocks or three channel amp and mounting them near the front three speakers?


The distance from pre/amp to speakers then would be run with interconnect rather than speaker wire. The speaker wire connection in this case would then be minimal.


What are the percieved advantages and disadvantages sonically to this set up as opposed to the more normal lengthy speaker run from the pre/amp and short interconnects between amp and pre amp?


Obviously the cost of esoteric interconnects could not be considered in this case, but the same can be said for speaker wire of a long run.


Many an ad shows this type of set up and I am wondering if there is a sonic improvement.

Not including balanced connectors in the system is there any advantage to placing the amp next to the speaker and shortening the speaker wire?
 

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I am wondering why you would, under any circumstances, want to run interconnect cable directly to speakers? It is not designed to carry a lot of current, even for short runs. Speaker wire of the appropriate gauge is. I don't see any upside to interconnect cable for this purpose.


Regards,

Terry
 

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Sounds like he is talking about mounting the amp near the speakers, farther away from the pre-amp, as opposed to mounting the pre-amp and amp close together.


So he would have long interconnect runs and short speaker wire runs, as opposed to short interconnect runs and long speaker wire runs.


I personally have no idea which way would be better, but that's how I interpreted the original post.
 

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I think it depends on what your goal and audio philosophy is as far as which is better. If you are using standard, large gauge speaker wire then it's pretty much a wash. However, if you're using higher-end cables, then you most likely want to use shorter speaker cables and longer interconnects because it's more economical that way (apples to apples, in the high-end realm, speaker cables are generally more expensive per foot/meter than interconnects) But, YMMV.


I have a mix myself. I use shorter speaker cables on my stereo mains (with the amps close to the speakers), and longer interconnects. But for the center and surrounds, I use shorter interconnects and longer speaker cables (with the amps close to the main components). Both ways work well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Rutgar


However, if you're using higher-end cables, then you most likely want to use shorter speaker cables and longer interconnects because it's more economical that way (apples to apples, in the high-end realm, speaker cables are generally more expensive per foot/meter than interconnects).

I cannot agree with the generalisation of costs. I have seen interconnects in four figures per foot. That is not the issue, assume identical quality for interconnect and cable, is there an advantage to one or the other connection?


If I had balanced interconnects it would be a no brainer but without them can any improvement be gained by placing the amps next to the speaker?


One way to find out I suppose.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwi2000 /forum/post/15483567


That is not the issue, assume identical quality for interconnect and cable, is there an advantage to one or the other connection?

When you put it that way, from my experience, it makes little difference and you should do it the way that suits you best.
 

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Quote:
When you put it that way, from my experience, it makes little difference and you should do it the way that suits you best.

+1


It's really just a matter of convenience. Decide where you'd like your components to be, and then buy cables/wires long enough to reach.


(If the relative cost of speaker cables and interconnects is a factor, then you're spending way too much on one or the other!)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by XanderMoser /forum/post/15492405


Speaker level signals are less likely to pick up interference than signal level. So if you're going near wall warts or other electromagnetic fields, keep that in mind.

The susceptibility to induced noise has nothing to do with the signal level. It is related to circuit impedance. An 8 Ohm speaker circuit has a very low impedance and it not very susceptible to induced noise. An interconnect, with high impedance loads is very susceptible to induced noise, due to the high impedance of the circuit.

Think about it, if it was signal level related, you'd hear noise when you turned the volume down.
 

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It's a no-brainer. Short interconnects and long, relatively fat speaker wire for the best noise immunity.
 

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The susceptibility to induced noise has nothing to do with the signal level.

Huh??? Of course it does at least in terms of whether that noise is of significance given the signal level. The amount of noise actually being induced in the cabling is basically the same regardless (given the same cabling), however whether that is a concern is HUGELY varied depending on how that noise compares with the signals you're trying to send. With speaker level amplified signals, it's insignificant basically, but with line level audio or video or other very low level signals it suddenly becomes very significant.
 

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Properly implemented it should not make a difference. Pick whichever makes you happy.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dknightd /forum/post/15496601


Properly implemented it should not make a difference. Pick whichever makes you happy.

That's not true. Two reasons long speaker wires are better. The first is there is absolutely no ground loop current in a speaker wire. Conversely, all unbalanced interconnects between components other than speakers have ground loop current, which results in some level of noise noise. The longer they are the bigger the noise problem.


Two. Speaker circuits are naturally balanced connections making them immune to electromagnetic interference. Make them as long as you want, provided the gauge is sufficient, and there will be less noise than even the best shielded coaxial cable of equal length.
 

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Quote:
Huh??? Of course it does at least in terms of whether that noise is of significance given the signal level.

No, as explained, it has to do with circuit impedance. If it was simply signal level related, then you'd hear noise when the volume was down, or in 'quiet parts'.

It's not easy to induce much current into a short (or close to it, 8ohm) circuit, It's very easy to induce current into a high impedance circuit, such as a high impedance audio input.

Quote:
With speaker level amplified signals, it's insignificant basically, but with line level audio or video or other very low level signals it suddenly becomes very significant.

Again, induced noise has nothing to do with the signal amplitude.
 

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Quote:
Again, induced noise has nothing to do with the signal amplitude.

Well, that's simply BS. Signal amplitude absolutely does have to do with it because if you're inducing a several millivolts into a speaker level connection that's not significant to anything, but it sure is if it's a video run.


You didn't explain anything, you just made a statement with no evidence that is ridiculous on its face.
 

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Well, that's simply BS.

No,it's fact. You're understanding of the issue is BS.

Quote:
You didn't explain anything, you just made a statement with no evidence that is ridiculous on its face.

you're lack of electrical knowledge is ridiculous. your explanation doesn't hold water, it makes no sense. I explained induced noise and impedance to you, you ignored it and rerpeated your misunderstanding of the issue...that's ridiculous.
 

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You two are saying the same thing. Of course the absolute level of induced noise does not depend on the level of the desired signal. It's relevance and impact on sonic quality does.
 
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