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Hi all. I have the paneling taken down in my family room for a separate reason, and thought I would take the opportunity to hide the power and HDMI cables going to the HDTV on the wall.


The cheapest way would be to just snake my existing HDMI cable through and use low-voltage wall plates, but that would require a 3/4" hole, and if the cable ever fails, or technology changes, I'd be stuck. After reading several threads here, it looks like 2 cat6 cables and these wall plates might be the best solution: :
http://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-HDMI-CAT5E-Extender-Plate/dp/B003KQ22W0/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1395005038&sr=1-4&keywords=hdmi+over+cat6


Does that make sense? Also, is there any reason I can't run the romex for the power alongside the cat6 cables? I know analog cables can pick up a hum, but I would think digital twisted pairs would be immune from noise. I have to go through 12 2x4's, including around a corner, so it would be nice if I didn't have to do it twice. Any input is appreciated.
 

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I would say that you should run conduit (1.25") two pieces of cat-6 and 2 HDMI cables which are in-wall rated.


If you can't run the conduit, then run 2 HDMI cables and THREE pieces of cat-6.


Those wall plates are intermittent between junk and mediocre. People have very mixed results, and I would call them an overall poor choice.


It is against electrical code to run romex through the same holes as low voltage. In a catastrophic failure of the romex, it has a high potential of passing high voltage into the low voltage cable which increases the potential fire issues. Follow code, keep them separate, yes, drill more holes. Why running the romex so far? Isn't there an outlet that is nearer? Or are you putting it on your surge suppressor.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated  /t/1522884/simple-14-in-wall-hdmi-and-power-run-opinions-requested#post_24491715


I would say that you should run conduit (1.25") two pieces of cat-6 and 2 HDMI cables which are in-wall rated.


If you can't run the conduit, then run 2 HDMI cables and THREE pieces of cat-6.


Those wall plates are intermittent between junk and mediocre. People have very mixed results, and I would call them an overall poor choice.


It is against electrical code to run romex through the same holes as low voltage. In a catastrophic failure of the romex, it has a high potential of passing high voltage into the low voltage cable which increases the potential fire issues. Follow code, keep them separate, yes, drill more holes. Why running the romex so far? Isn't there an outlet that is nearer? Or are you putting it on your surge suppressor.

Thanks for the reply. The TV is over the fireplace mantel (don't worry, it doesn't get hot, been there for five years), and there are no outlets on that wall. This corner has three 2x4's packed together, I don't know how you'd get conduit through there. (the screen is to block vermin, the original reason for taking down the paneling)







I just need to get one HDMI signal to one TV as easily, cheaply and reliably as possible.
 

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In all fairness, you are thinking about this a bit wrong.


Don't you want to run the wiring now that gives you the best connection for the next 10-20 years? While there are no guarantees, it is worth saying that about 10-12 years ago there was no such thing as HDMI. You would have run component video (maybe) and composite video. You would have been quite happy that you were protected for the future, then HDMI came along, and you would be SOL.


HDMI is a much peskier connection. The cables are decent, but do break, they are nearly impossible to repair, and they are tough to run. When walls are open, and cabling will be put behind difficult drywall, then the minimum cables to run to any TV location are 2 HDMI cables and 2 cat-6 cables. This is the CHEAPEST solution, because if you put in one HDMI cable and it fails, you have to rip down your wall to run a replacement cable.


So, the cabling speaks to reliability, and the preference is for 3 cat-6 cables to that end along with 2 HDMI cables.


Cabling from Monoprice is inexpensive and works well:
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10250&cs_id=1025001&p_id=6102&seq=1&format=2

and
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10232&cs_id=1023216&p_id=8602&seq=1&format=2


About $75 in cabling which should protect you for over a decade and deliver solid quality right away.


Other than running conduit, I'm not sure what other fully reliable solution is out there. Certainly not the wall plates, their own reviews speak to how questionable they are! - http://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-HDMI-CAT5E-Extender-Plate/product-reviews/B003KQ22W0/ref=cm_cr_pr_hist_1?ie=UTF8&filterBy=addOneStar&showViewpoints=0&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending


If extending HDMI over cat cabling, use HDBT, not something else, and that will be more expensive than just running the cables to start with.
 

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I've used hdmi keystone jacks with no problems:

Monoprice HDMI keystone jacks


I did not use Monoprice's version, however. I like the clean look of keystone jacks, and you can add cat6, cable, etc., four or more jacks in one plate.


The best idea is to run conduit then run HDMI through the conduit.


You should be able to drill through three 2x4s with no problems. I can't see where you're trying to go, however. Note that there are rules as to how large a hole can be:

Codes for drilling studs
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctviggen  /t/1522884/simple-14-in-wall-hdmi-and-power-run-opinions-requested#post_24519429


I've used hdmi keystone jacks with no problems:

Monoprice HDMI keystone jacks


I did not use Monoprice's version, however. I like the clean look of keystone jacks, and you can add cat6, cable, etc., four or more jacks in one plate.


The best idea is to run conduit then run HDMI through the conduit.


You should be able to drill through three 2x4s with no problems. I can't see where you're trying to go, however. Note that there are rules as to how large a hole can be:

Codes for drilling studs

First, you either didn't read the OP's post or the link carefully. He was asking about extenders, not keystone coupler inserts.


Second, your suggestion of installing conduit and running HDMI through the conduit is poor advice. Why in the world would you want to start filling up a conduit while you have access to the walls? Conduit is for future use (except obviously where required by code, usually in commercial construction).


To the OP: run at least one HDMI (two would be better), a couple of Cat6 runs, and maybe a Cat5 for the heck of it. If you can install conduit, great, but don't put all that wire in the conduit!
 
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