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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,


I know this is basic stuff, but I can't seem to find an answer online (probably using the wrong search terms)...


I have a new house with 22 Cat5e drops throughout the house. All 22 terminate in an equipment closet. My internet access is provided through cable, which also terminates in the closet.


Currently, I am not using the wired network; instead, I have the cable modem plugged into a D-Link DIR-655 wireless router + switch, and I have a few devices (laptops, PS3) running wirelessly.


I would like to create a combined wired + wireless network. Is the correct setup for this to leave the cable modem plugged into the D-Link router and then plug a 24 port switch into one of the router's switch ports? That seems like it would drastically limit bandwidth available for multiple devices connected to the switch. Is there a better way? I don't want to spend $1200 on a 24 port router if I can avoid it.


Thanks,


Jonathan
 

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A true router would only require two ports, one LAN one WAN. The extra ports you see on the LAN side are simply a built in switch. You won't see any performance issues connecting a 24 port switch to your existing router. If your at at all worried about it, purchase a gigabit router and a 24 port gigabit switch.
 

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To elaborate just a bit - typically your WAN side connection (to the internet) provide by your ISP is quite slow compared to the LAN side.


Thus your bottle neck will be the WAN side - not the LAN side - connecting a 24 port switch to the LAN side of your router will be fine.
 

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I have a very similar question and setup. I have a DSL connection with about 4.5 Mbps download speed that is run to a wireless router with built-in 4port switch (10/100). Since the WAN side will never come close to the 100 Mbps limitation of the router/switch; is there ever a reason to have a gigabit wireless router/switch? My plan was to perhaps have a 24 port 10/100 switch connected with an ethernet cable to the 10/100 wireless router switch to take care of internet services; with the switch also having 2 gigabit ports. Since the internet speed is restricted by the service purchased and DSL technology in general; the only thing to improve is the speed between devices on the network - not anything related to download speed off the internet (right?). I only have one device that is gigabit compatible (PS3). I have Directv receivers that can stream from the network, but they are only 10/100 compatible. I would connect the PS3 and my PC (Server) to the gigabit ports to allow streaming to the PS3 off the PC harddrive at a gigabit speed. If I eventually have more gigabit devices, can I not use one of the 2 gigabit ports to run to another 8 port gigabit switch and run more gigabit devices on the network? In short, I am wondering if a 24 port 10/100 switch with 2 gigabit ports will limit my system in any way now and provide room for expansion and gigabit speed within the network with more gigabit devices in the future by simply connecting an additional gigabit switch. Thanks.
 

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While you could add the 8 port switch you mentioned you would now have ALL the traffic between devices on that 8 port switch and devices on the 24 port switch going through the single connection from the 8 port to the 24 port.


In practice you might be fine with this but it COULD be another bottle neck if you had a lot devices trying to move data across this one link.


If you don't imagine ever needing 24 ports I would go with a single 8 or 16 port gigabyte switch - you can connect non-gigabyte devices without issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the feedback guys, I knew it had to be simpler than I was making it. One more question, if the wireless router/4 port switch is acting as the DHCP the server, does that mean that every machine connected to the 24 port switch will have to go through the router every time, thus creating a bottleneck? Or will the 24 port switch have its own DHCP server and I should turn off the router's server? Or do I not understand how this works at all?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan DA /forum/post/19587507


Thanks for the feedback guys, I knew it had to be simpler than I was making it. One more question, if the wireless router/4 port switch is acting as the DHCP the server, does that mean that every machine connected to the 24 port switch will have to go through the router every time, thus creating a bottleneck? Or will the 24 port switch have its own DHCP server and I should turn off the router's server? Or do I not understand how this works at all?

DHCP is just for assigning addresses - it's not involved in communications after that. So think of it as effectively a one-time process (there is a renewal that happens probably once a day, but it's nothing to worry about).


A "switch" is just a switch, it doesn't provide network services such as routing or DHCP, etc. What we generally call a router at home is better termed a "residential gateway" because it performs a number of functions (routing, DHCP, DNS, firewall, etc.).


And just because you have 22 wires doesn't mean you need a 24 port switch - how many runs to you expect to actually use? You can just plug in the likely locations and leave the rest unused - that will save you money, as 5 or 8-port switches are very common for residential use and therefore very cheap.


Jeff
 

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Good info here...I've got anther question for you "LAN-switch-smart-guys":


As I understand it 24 individual Cat5e drops from different locations in the house get plugged in to the 24 port D-Link switch, then the Switch gets plugged into the DHCP router (with the WAN connected) to get everything communicating with the internet.


My question is this: is it possible to have another gigabit switch at one of the original 24 locations that has multiple devices. For example: my son's room has, an Xbox, PS3 and a computer conncected into a 4 port switch...can I then just run 1 cat5e to media closet and connect that to the larger 24 port switch. I guess essentially it would be "nesting" switches...I that possible or problematic?


Thanks in advance!

John
 

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Yes that is allowed.


While theoretically it could become a bottleneck (the 4 devices sharing the 1 connection) in practice it most always works just fine.


I have that situation in a number of places throughout my house and have no problems.
 

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To avoid the "nesting" of switches, I have further thought this through and taking input on this configuration: Run an ethernet cable directly out of the DSL modem (in which my fiber line comes into the house) to a 8-port gigabit switch. From one port on the switch, run an ethernet back to the 10/100 wireless internet router. Then, from one of the LAN ports on the router, run a cable back to an older 16 port 10/100 switch to handle basic internet services for network devices and various drops throughout the house. I would have a handful of devices connected to the gigabit switch - those that stream videos/music from the server, some with gigabit nics and some with just 10/100 (Directv receivers). The 10/100 switch would simply provide basic internet services to the various drops throughout the house - which should not limit any internet speeds.

Any issues with this setup? Does this avoid any "bottleneck" issues? Is it ok supplying the 10/100 wireless router with a cable from the gigabit switch? Too many devices in the setup? The gigabit switch and 10/100 switch would not be directly connected.

Thanks in advance for any feedback. I am hoping this is perhaps my best setup with the fastest internal network speeds for streaming within the house and not further hindering the internet speed itself that is limited by the internet provider and DSL technology.
 

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The ONLY thing that the network connection on your DSL modem should connect to is the WAN port on your router.


Everything else inside your home (that needs access to the internet) should be connected to something that eventually connects to the LAN port on your router.


If you want a fast connection between devices in your home use a gigabyte switch to connect all of these devices and then have one connection from the gigabyte switch to the LAN port on your router.


If none of the devices in you home support gigabyte connections then you can use a 10/100 switch or a gigabyte switch.


This will work fine.
 

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Thanks for the clarification. I understand what you saying; however, what I am trying to do is avoid purchasing an expensive 16 or 24 port gigabit switch when I already have a 16 port 10/100 that will work well for everything except perhaps the two gigabit capable devices on my network. I don't "need" 16 or 24 gigabit ports, but I was hoping to simply add a cheap 8 port gigabit switch to this setup to experiment with streaming between server and PS3. I go back to simply running an ethernet cable from one of the switches (gigabit or 10/100) to the other to provide the option for gigabit transfer speed within the network or basic 10/100 for those that don't need it. The fear of potential bottlenecking or otherwise drove the thoughts of changing this thought (connecting a gigabit and a 10/100 switch together to expand capacity). In other words, is it plausible to keep my 16 port 10/100 switch and simply add an 8 port gigabit switch and have them both function properly on my network? Perhaps a separate run for a different port on the router for each switch rather than running a cable between the two switches? Thanks again.
 

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How many non-gigabyte devices in you home? How many LAN ports on your router.


If you have enough LAN ports on your router to handle all of your non-gigabyte devices AND still leave a port to connect to a small gigabyte switch then you can do that.


Otherwise connect a router LAN port to a port on your non-gigabyte switch and a port on your non-gigabyte switch to the gigabyte switch.


Connect your non-gigabyte devices to the non-gigabyte switch and your gigabyte devices to the gigabyte switch.


All should be fine.
 
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