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Jerry I flipped the two VBSS with the left and right speakers and reran the sweep (basically the subs are now in the corners)...the 70hz dip that used to be there is almost non-existent...I watched a movie in there over the weekend and I also feel that having the L/R closer to the tv seemed to help with the overall sound...After hearing it I don't think they liked being near the corner at all...the sweep looks much better in that regard too...I will get the near fields built in the next couple weeks and will post another picture (correctly) of the sweep...thanks for all that you do and everyone else that volunteers their valuable time to help others...
 
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Why bother guessing? As per the linked video, it isn't exactly a hard process. I don't see the point in doing this at all for this situation mind you but that is a different issue!
Thanks Matt, I will certainly give it a try out of sheer interest. In the mean time, I'm going to compare the 2 responses as suggested by Jerry.

I love how friendly, understanding and helpful everyone is on this thread. Very refreshing.
 

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Thank you for your input, much appreciated.



What configuration of Atmos do you have ?

I now have a 5.2.4 setup, I use a MiniDSP 4x2HD to time align both subs and “Audyssify” everything— I use the iPad Audyssey editor app connected to my Denon 4400. I find it very helpful. After I EQ the environment, then I work on the Center Channel plus both Subs distance tweak.
Not yet a pro at all this — but there is nothing like feeling that tight chest punch of well done bass response. Never ever heard this great sound before, creating it is confusing as hell at first, but I just kept trying. I’m much better today. And—almost—smilingly satisfied.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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I'm sure it's been covered before but I get my Umik-1 tomorrow and I was wondering if I should take the level adjustments set by my Yamahas YPAO measurements and set them all the same like to 0.0 db before taking measurements?
 

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I'm sure it's been covered before but I get my Umik-1 tomorrow and I was wondering if I should take the level adjustments set by my Yamahas YPAO measurements and set them all the same like to 0.0 db before taking measurements?
Typically, you would run REW measurements to observe how your speakers are performing in your listening room. The frequency response of your speakers are unaffected by the levels in your AVR, so there would be no reason to zero out the AVR trims. Set your AVR master volume so that you are reaching 85-90dB for the measurements, and you will be good to go.
 
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Hi all - This is a chart of Kef LS50's in a nearfield setup, with a Rhythmik sub. What can I do about the dips just after 60 and 100?
Thx!
 

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Typically, you would run REW measurements to observe how your speakers are performing in your listening room. The frequency response of your speakers are unaffected by the levels in your AVR, so there would be no reason to zero out the AVR trims. Set your AVR master volume so that you are reaching 85-90dB for the measurements, and you will be good to go.
Thanks. That makes sense but now I'm wondering about the bass crossover. When I do the frequency sweeps on my 7 speakers should I tell my Yamaha receiver to set all the speakers to "large" and choose "none" for subwoofer so I can get a good reading from say 40Hz to 20kHz. Then when checking the sub set the speakers back to small and set the crossover all the way up to 200Hz? Or maybe it'd be easier to keep the speakers at small and just set the crossover to 40Hz when checking the 7 speakers so they get 40Hz and above then set it to 200Hz when checking the subwoofer?
 

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Hi all - This is a chart of Kef LS50's in a nearfield setup, with a Rhythmik sub. What can I do about the dips just after 60 and 100?
Thx!
I have a null at 120Hz as well, are your LS50's close to 2.5 ft from a side or rear wall by chance? Mine are and I can't really move them so I live with it for now but if you have more placement options try to get them further away from the walls. Placing your mains further from boundaries reduces the frequency of your boundary dip, ideally below your crossover point. Conversely, placing your subs close to corners moves their dip way above the crossover, so you this is a good way of letting your subs and mains work together to achieve a smoother response. If your subs aren't close to the corners of your room, that could also explain the 60Hz dip, otherwise it might be a room mode.

Oh and separate measurements of your mains, subs alone and mains + subs are a good idea to see exactly what is responsible for these dips. Playing your mains + subs might mask the extent of the problem. But better to get them placed ideally before measuring again.
 

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Thanks. That makes sense but now I'm wondering about the bass crossover. When I do the frequency sweeps on my 7 speakers should I tell my Yamaha receiver to set all the speakers to "large" and choose "none" for subwoofer so I can get a good reading from say 40Hz to 20kHz. Then when checking the sub set the speakers back to small and set the crossover all the way up to 200Hz? Or maybe it'd be easier to keep the speakers at small and just set the crossover to 40Hz when checking the 7 speakers so they get 40Hz and above then set it to 200Hz when checking the subwoofer?
Your measurements should reflect how you have things set up for typical listening. So, assuming you want your subs to do what they were intended to do, set your crossovers to something like 80Hz, and your speakers to small, and run the measurement sweeps 15-20,000Hz. Why would you want to do anything else?
 

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I have a null at 120Hz as well, are your LS50's close to 2.5 ft from a side or rear wall by chance?
Yes, and unfortunately I don't have a lot of options... Thx!
 

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Yes, and unfortunately I don't have a lot of options... Thx!
I feel your pain, I have LS50's too, but every speaker has the same dip in my space. What makes it worse is I have dual subs and the only way I have room is to place them underneath my mains on short stands so they exhibit the same problems. The good news in your situation is that it is a very sharp (high Q) dip so it's probably not audible, the larger dip at 60 most likely is though.
 

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Your measurements should reflect how you have things set up for typical listening. So, assuming you want your subs to do what they were intended to do, set your crossovers to something like 80Hz, and your speakers to small, and run the measurement sweeps 15-20,000Hz. Why would you want to do anything else?
I have 2 possible locations for my sub so I thought seeing how it performed without a crossover in play to see where it performs best and also see how it performs in both locations with my probable crossover set. Also I figured the 7 speakers are set in their locations so I wanted to see their frequency response without a crossover in order to decide where to set the crossover. Then once everything is set (sub location, crossover...) Then test the setup.
 

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I have 2 possible locations for my sub so I thought seeing how it performed without a crossover in play to see where it performs best and also see how it performs in both locations with my probable crossover set. Also I figured the 7 speakers are set in their locations so I wanted to see their frequency response without a crossover in order to decide where to set the crossover. Then once everything is set (sub location, crossover...) Then test the setup.
Nothing wrong with your approach. Different types of measurements are used in different situations.

To find the best location for two subs, measure each sub by itself with room correction off, using HDMI4 (LFE). Once you think you have found the best spots, measure both subs together, room correction off. Since room correction response is dependent on sub locations, the correction is invalid as soon as you move the subs, so that is why you want it off.

And as far as determining the correct crossover for the mains, measure each speaker by itself (set to Large) and observe the point where the speaker’s response on the low end falls by 10dB. Once again, do this with room correction turned off. Then set the crossover one octave higher. So, for example, if the response is -10dB at 40Hz, set the crossover at 80Hz. Also, I like to set the same crossover for all speakers, at least the front 3, to more closely match the sound across the front soundstage. My center is down 10dB at a slightly higher point than my left and right speakers, so I determine the crossover for all three based on the center’s response. This approach is less important for the surrounds, which in my setup are smaller speakers.

And once you have decided on the sub locations and have set the mains crossovers, re-run room correction and measure the final results with correction turned on.
 

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Nothing wrong with your approach. Different types of measurements are used in different situations.


To find the best location for two subs, measure each sub by itself with room correction off, using HDMI4 (LFE). Once you think you have found the best spots, measure both subs together, room correction off. Since room correction response is dependent on sub locations, the correction is invalid as soon as you move the subs, so that is why you want it off.

And as far as determining the correct crossover for the mains, measure each speaker by itself (set to Large) and observe the point where the speaker’s response on the low end falls by 10dB. Once again, do this with room correction turned off. Then set the crossover one octave higher. So, for example, if the response is -10dB at 40Hz, set the crossover at 80Hz. Also, I like to set the same crossover for all speakers, at least the front 3, to more closely match the sound across the front soundstage. My center is down 10dB at a slightly higher point than my left and right speakers, so I determine the crossover for all three based on the center’s response. This approach is less important for the surrounds, which in my setup are smaller speakers.

And once you have decided on the sub locations and have set the mains crossovers, re-run room correction and measure the final results with correction turned on.
Thanks for the quick response and the help. Trying to get it figured out before the wife loses it... Sorry if I wasn't clear but I have 1 sub and 2 possible locations for it. My Yamaha rx-a730 doesn't have individual crossover settings anyway so it's one for all anyway. So when you say turn off the room correction does that mean go into manual setup , set the speakers to large and maybe turn the sub off? I imagine I don't have to mess with the levels because, as you said before, I'll be setting the dB level in REW using the generator and SPL meter. While on that subject I was wondering why you suggested 85-90dB as opposed to 75dB which is what I've seen recommended? Thanks
 

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Thanks for the quick response and the help. Trying to get it figured out before the wife loses it... Sorry if I wasn't clear but I have 1 sub and 2 possible locations for it. My Yamaha rx-a730 doesn't have individual crossover settings anyway so it's one for all anyway. So when you say turn off the room correction does that mean go into manual setup , set the speakers to large and maybe turn the sub off? I imagine I don't have to mess with the levels because, as you said before, I'll be setting the dB level in REW using the generator and SPL meter. While on that subject I was wondering why you suggested 85-90dB as opposed to 75dB which is what I've seen recommended? Thanks
Figure out what your noise floor is. Then run sweeps at least 40db above noise floor. Most people's noise floor is 45 to 50db so that's why we recommend 85-90db. Point of that is not for the freq response (since it doesn't change based on spl level) but its useful for decay such as waterfall and spectrogram to see how long/fast it decays all the way down to noise floor.
 

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Probably already too late. :D
Some learn to tolerate it. I'm grateful to be one of those lucky few.
Jerry's single. :cool:
Michael
My wife just goes upstairs and watches her shows or reads a book while I'm doing my measurements. She has learned to be patient with me and has found out that movies and music sounds better after incorporating and learning minidsp/rew into my system. So when I want to measure...she knows its for audio improvement and just let me do my thing.
 
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Probably already too late. :D
Some learn to tolerate it. I'm grateful to be one of those lucky few.
Jerry's single. :cool:
Michael
Ha! I got my Umik-1 yesterday and It took me awhile to get it and REW figured and unfortunately I got it going right AFTER she got home . Apparently she didn't like me asking her to try to be quiet while she was making dinner...
 

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Ha! I got my Umik-1 yesterday and It took me awhile to get it and REW figured and unfortunately I got it going right AFTER she got home . Apparently she didn't like me asking her to try to be quiet while she was making dinner...
Wait till she tells you to be quiet when you ask "what's for dinner hon"..........:)
 

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Probably already too late. :D
Some learn to tolerate it. I'm grateful to be one of those lucky few.
Jerry's single. :cool:
Michael
I am too and very greatfull to my wife too!
 
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