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I am building a new home and want lights above the theater seats. I am going to put in recessed lights but can't decide on what size. In my current house I have 6 inch 65 watt can lights above the seats on dimmers. I like them as I like have some light above the seating area so we are not always in the dark as we watch a lot of sports and other shows beside movies. However, when dimming the lights the light they put out seems to get more yellow where as when all the way up they are more of a soft white. Obviously, we rarely have them all the way up. Therefore, does anyone know of a better option. I was looking at 6 inch and 4 inch but will assume I would have the same problem. Has anyone used the small 3 inch line voltage lights? Maybe it is that I am just using the wrong bulb as well?
 

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I have 4" cans above my seats with an 8ft ceiling. I don't have any issue with the color of the lighting. Yes, if you look at a heavily dimmed light bulb it has a yellow look but who cares the light it projects is fine. I use 35w or 50w bulbs in my 4" can lights.
 

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I went with:


1)6 sconces along side wall

2)12 micro track lights (MR11 12v bulbs) on a black track along the ceiling (black) - virtually invisible, but gives off lots of light from overhead without large 'cans'. See Halo Linea system.

3)lighting in riser for steps

4)rope light in recessed channel around proscenium arch.


db
 

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The "yellow light" is a basic problem with standard incandescent lamps. Halogen lamps are much closer to "white" or sunlight at all dimming levels. The problem with a straight swap is that you'd need 6" halogen fixtures, and don't know of any. But do some research - I'm certainly not very knowledgeable about 6" fixtures. (I always use 4" or smaller.)
 

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Yup, I have 4 halogens above the seating and they do still turn towards yellow/orange when dimmed down, but that's just physics (the cooler the filament gets as it is dimmed down, the more the light it emits shifts towards the color red.)


They also have dimmable LED lighting now. I would think they would hold their color across their range of intensity, although the white they put out will likely be different than the white you are used to with incandescent. Further, they can be a little pricy.


-Suntan
 

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An MR16 (or MR11) is probably the least "orange" you will find in a conventional lamp when dimmed.


Depending on the color temperature you are after (at a given foot candle) LED, like Suntan mentioned, or even florescent might be great options.


I know that several companies have developed dimmable LED lamps that will fit into an Edison base lampholder. I believe these generally cost in the range of $60-$80 per lamp and have a life expectancy of up to 80,000 hrs. I have never personally witnessed these dimmed, in a house, so I can't vouch for their CRI at low levels. One benefit here is the option of using a standard recessed fixture which can be very cost effective.


Florescent cans could be a great alternative as well though. They become costly as you install dimming ballasts, but they have the ability to "stay the same color" all the way down to almost off. You also have the option of specifying the color temperature of these lamps.


Rob
 
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