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Can't answer your question about the D-VHS models, but I can relate my experience with 2 JVC VCR's I had in the early '90's. One was an over $600 S-VHS model, and one was a lower-end VHS unit. Both had the same transport, and both failed (in different ways) in about 1.5 years. JVC customer service was of no help, they seemed to feel 18 months was an acceptable lifetime for a VCR. Those 2 VCR's were the last JVC products I will ever own.
 

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On the other side of things I'm still using my JVC S-VHS VCR. I bought it new in November 1999. I just bought a JVC 40K refurb that arrived a couple of days ago.


I don't think the 5U's have been out long enough to know for sure if they will start having any problems. There are some people with 30 and 40K's that have had all kinds of problems and there are others with no problems at all.


I decided to try one out and see how it goes.


Good Luck,


Jim
 

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Usually, it split nylon gears in hard to reach places that is the death of these transports.


I've said this before, instead of reinventing the wheel why didn't JVC create a *bulletproof* mechanism, standardize it, and make them by the billions instead of trying to shave .05 here and there and reduce part count? Bean counters. End of rant.


Paul
 

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Of course the HM-5U has only been available a few weeks so nobody will have any idea regarding whether or not is better built. I have the HM-DH30000U and HM-DH40000U and both are working great. I also have the Mitsubishi D-VHS and believe it is better built than the JVC models just by sound and feel. JVC has been my preferred VCR for a long time because of picture quality, features and appearance. I have 1995 and a 1998 vintage JVC SVHS VCRs which still work great although they too have a fragile sound and feel. The reputation is that JVC consumer VCRs are not very durable. With light use and proper care, I find they do just fine. I have so many VCRs that no one VCR gets heavy use which probably explains why mine hold up over the long run. I do believe the 40K is better built than the 30K which may indicate the 5U will be as good as or better than the 40K if JVC is headed in the right direction.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Paul Bigelow
Usually, it split nylon gears in hard to reach places that is the death of these transports.


I've said this before, instead of reinventing the wheel why didn't JVC create a *bulletproof* mechanism, standardize it, and make them by the billions instead of trying to shave .05 here and there and reduce part count? Bean counters. End of rant.


Paul
A well built VCR didn't sell or JVC would have done that. The competition was very cheap throw away VCRs and the consumer spoke by buying that product. Well built with high quality components will always be more expensive than mass produced throw away items. I am a bean counter. Consumers. End of rant.


Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just wondered what it was like for digital drop outs. I had a Mits 2000U which played many tapes that JVC 30K wouldn't, and had far fewer dropouts on many tapes.


Just wondered how it may compare.
 

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It's a well known fact by now that the Mits decks have an exceptional tape transport, while the JVC D-VHS have about as ****** a transport as can be found.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Matt_Stevens
It's a well known fact by now that the Mits decks have an exceptional tape transport, while the JVC D-VHS have about as ****** a transport as can be found.
Almost every consumer VHS VCR built in the last few years has a far worse transport than the JVC D-VHS VCRs. If you are referring to D-VHS models only, the record would indicate JVC is at the bottom of the heap. The precision requirements for the D-VHS format meant that JVC needed to add $50 or whatever incremental cost was necessary to build the best consumer tape transport and unfortunately they didn't do that. It may have been intended for such an interim format that durability wasn't a concern. The intent must have been short term profits at the expense of customer goodwill.


Chris
 

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The best tape transports were and are built by Panasonic. I have never had one fail. Other parts failed but not the transport. The best example is Panny DVHS. Heads failed on those after heavy use but I never had anybody complaind about the transport. I do not understand why JVC has their own crappy transports instead of using Panasonic that owns 52% of them.
 

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My 5U has 90 hours under the hood and so far, I can tell:


- The best deck I had until know is the Mits. It either works perfectly, never dropping, or not at all with some tapes. It can't read in particular tapes made with the Japanese NV-DH1 Panny deck. It cannot read also some tapes made with a specific 30K that must be a bit out of whack.


- The 30Ks and the 40ks never could read tapes made with the NV-DH1 Panny deck. I have several, and all of them required cleaning after no more than 40 hours, sometimes 20.


- The 5U can read perfectly all the tapes I have, including the ones the Mits can't. 90 hours is a bit short to be conclusive, but if it holds without dropping, it will top all other decks.


- The 30Ks and 40Ks transport is exactly the same as the one I have on a 6 year old SVHS PAL JVC deck. JVC just re-used a transport originally designed for SVHS tapes, no wonder it's completely crappy for digital recordings.


- The 5U transport is completely new, with a much shorter pinch roller for example.


So, the 5U *looks* like a winner, except that JVC found a way to completely mess it up: if you use it to watch shows where commercials have been removed with HDTVtoMPEG2 for example, the audio often loses sync at the commercial removal points.


Even with non edited streams, reception drops can trigger lip-sync, and you have to hit stop/play to re-sync.


Somebody needs to be fired at JVC...
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Chris Gerhard
A well built VCR didn't sell or JVC would have done that. The competition was very cheap throw away VCRs and the consumer spoke by buying that product. Well built with high quality components will always be more expensive than mass produced throw away items. I am a bean counter. Consumers. End of rant.


Chris
Over $600 for an S-VHS VCR isn't enough money to design a reliable product? Even the lower-end VHS model I had that also failed cost well over $100. I'm not talking about the $50-60 models sold today.


Later, in early '96 I bought an RCA model VCR. (Their top unit at the time) Then, in late '96 I bought a Proscan model. (Very similar to the RCA, with a few extra features.) Until December 2003, they both have received heavy use, minimum 4 hours/day each. I still have them both, and they still work fine. Since I scored a couple replay's cheap during DNNA's pricing snafu last December, I rarely use the VCR's anymore. It is possible to design a lower-cost VCR to be reliable; apparently it's just not possible for JVC.


Since you're a bean counter, I have a question for you. Does the companies reputation for quality have any weight at all in the decision process when designing a new product? Or do they just figure it's ok to piss off customers, there are new ones born every day who don't know any better? I, for one, will never purchase a JVC product again for the rest of my life. Not just because they were poorly made, but because JVC didn't care when I called them.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by CKNA
The best tape transports were and are built by Panasonic. I have never had one fail. Other parts failed but not the transport. The best example is Panny DVHS. Heads failed on those after heavy use but I never had anybody complaind about the transport. I do not understand why JVC has their own crappy transports instead of using Panasonic that owns 52% of them.
My JVC W-VHS has what appears to me to be far and away the best tape transport I have seen. I have also read that the expensive professional JVC SVHS and D-9 transports are top notch. Of course all of these VCRs are very expensive.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Markz2k
Since you're a bean counter, I have a question for you. Does the companies reputation for quality have any weight at all in the decision process when designing a new product? Or do they just figure it's ok to piss off customers, there are new ones born every day who don't know any better? I, for one, will never purchase a JVC product again for the rest of my life. Not just because they were poorly made, but because JVC didn't care when I called them.
I can't explain why JVC didn't build better quality VCRs, quality has to be a consideration. Customer relations also should be a major consideration. Once VCRs became throw away items, build quality was no longer a concern. I understand how you feel and you are not alone. My experience has been different obviously with more JVC products than any other company and all working properly. Odds are that just as many Panasonic, Sony, Samsung, Philips, Thomson, etc. customers have had similar experiences to yours.


Chris
 

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I've had many professional/industrial JVC decks with bad transports too. I'm talking about $5,000 decks here. I used to use JVC all the time in the 1980's, but in the early 1990 they started to cut a lot of corners and I had a lot of bad decks. I've switched to Panasonic ProLine long ago, due to too many problems and issues with JVC transports.


JVC's W-VHS decks are built very well, one of the "better" designs they have made in quite a while. I still have several JVC professional decks I have to keep, so whenever someone brings in a "JVC format" tape I can work with it.


As for D-Theater, I'm stuck as JVC is the only supplier. Like robena described, hopefully the 5U is better.
 

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Late entry:

I am considering purchasing the 5U. But like my Sony Megachanger (777es) only certain on line retailers are "authorized" retailers. For example, Vanns, and Onecall are authorized, whereas the cheapo places are typically not.


When it comes to mechanical items, I usually try to take special care of warranties, etc. So purchasing for an authorized dealer is probably important, along with an extended warranty. I purchased the extended warranty on my Sony Camera, and it went bad, and paid twice the price of the warranty to get it fixed. Anything mechanical, like VCRs for example fall into this category.


So the question, as I have already spent considerable time on the JVC site, is, who are the JVC authorized on-line dealers?
 
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