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The only thing I would add is that the HD-15 connectors have even denser spacing than the DB-25 example on the web page. I use and reccomned the Weller 25-watt iron with the smallest tip which I believe was a 3/64ths cone tip.


Also, the finest guage solder wick is the best way to remove any excess solder.


Gary
 

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There was a post a couple of weeks ago about HD 15 connectors with screw-on terminals on the back. Don't know if these would be good, but this is the url that was given:
http://www.bi-tronics.com/


Randy D




[This message has been edited by Randy D (edited 09-29-2001).]
 

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Two additional hints and a warning -


Hint 1 - before soldering the wires, place 1/4 to half inch pieces of heat shrink tubing just a bit larger then the wires insolation. After soldering all the connections, push the tubing over the wire ends and solder cups/pins. Take a match or other small heat sources and carefully shrink the tubing. Not only doe it look better, but offers some mechanical strength to the solder joint.


Hint 2 - Alligator clips work great as mini-vises to hold the connector as a third hand.



Warning - After soldering, check for wayward strands of wire and solder bridges. I usually run a sharp knife gently between the pins before doing the hint above.

 

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For the life of me I cannot make a good cable from this. I originally started out with a Female HD-15 to STP junction box adapter(this is connected to my 30ft bettercables.com VGA cable), then I would plug in a Cat5 STP->HD-15 Male cable(to allow for easy swithing from HDTV to HTPC). With this setup I get a LOT of ghosting/ringing on the image. I've tried resoldering a couple times and it's gotten better/worse with each attempt. My last attempt was just a HD-15 Female->HD-15 Male 3ft cable that I attached to my 30ft VGA cable and it still added too much ringing/ghosting.


I've been trying to make sure the length of all the wires is the same. I put on solder flux and tinted all the ends of the wires, then tinted the d-cups and soldered them together.


I am just not having any luck with this at all, any ideas??


Brian
 

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I've had great success with the above mentioned method. Although I must admit, soldering is rather tedious - and being a perfectionist certainly doesn't speed up the process. As a bit of an experiment I also made a cable with crimp HD-15 connectors - The image was just as clean and sharp as the solder type, less messy, and the end result was very clean looking. Everyone is talking about soldering, but the crimp types also work wonderfully.


Mike
 

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When you say "crimp type" are you referring to one designed to crimp onto ribbon cable, or the type where the pins come separately and are crimped onto each wire individually and then inserted into the shell?


I'm assuming you mean the latter, just wanted to clarify.


What did you use for tooling? This construction type is usually superior to solder cup, but the set up tends to be more expensive because of the tooling required.


These connectors are inexpensive and readily available from the right source. And far less labor intensive.


-Ted-


[This message has been edited by tlum (edited 09-30-2001).]
 

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Ted-


Yes... you are correct. I would crimp each individual wire onto a pin and insert those into the shell. As far as the tooling, if you want to get a quality crimper it was about $35. The cost, IMO, was worth it. I still saved a TON over having custom cables made, I have the tool for any future crimping that I need to do, and once you have the crimper, buying pins (come in bags of 100 for about $5) and the shells (about $1.50 each) are cheap - I've made cables for friends that didn't want to deal with it and all have turned out GREAT! The time I saved was also well worth it. What took me 60 minutes to solder takes about 10 minutes to crimp... and that's going very slow....


Mike
 

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Thanks Mike. I wanted to present the whole picture to everyone on the thread. For some on a lower budget a proper crimp tool is something they might not buy into. Still others would have no problem with it and love the far easier work it makes of assembling a cable.


You can crimp a pin in a fraction of the time it takes to solder one. The pins are crimped one at a time so there is no tedious work in tight places, no accidental solder bridges, no flux smoke in your eyes, no burned fingers.


The wire is cut and stripped just long enough to sink into the pin so that the insulation butts against the end of the pin. The pin inserts into the shell below the surface so that no part of the pin or wire is exposed, no heat srink or secondary insulation is required.


Crimp types have much better impedance tolerance compared to their solder cup bothers.


One word of caution. These pins snap in and lock. Extractions tools are available, but that's another cost. I have made hundreds of cables (I worked in the mfgr. industry) and can tell you from experience that sooner or later you will miss count and stick the right pin in the wrong hole. Without a pin extractor, it ain't coming back out, so check and check again before you commit.


For those going the solder route. DO NOT put extra flux on the wire or the connector, there should be a sufficient flux core in the solder to begin with. Residual flux is corrosive and technically should be washed from completed work using solvent, otherwise the whole assembly will degrade over time. Alcohol usually works, and it may be necessary to lightly brush heavy deposits. Connector manufacturers usually specify acceptable and non-acceptable solvents, though this data may not be available if you obtain connectors from sources like Radio Shack. Keep the tip of your iron clean by periodically wiping on a damp sponge.


-Ted-
 

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Mike / Ted,


This is exactly the solution I need for a long VGA cable run that one of the sides went bad on. Can you recommend the proper crimper, pins, and shell as well as source for making an HD15 male.


Steve
 
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