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First question is it better to crimp connections on X-overs or solder? Second does silver solder have a shelf life or is it still just as good after lets say 8 years inside a plastic bag? Third what is the best way to mount x-over components, cable ties, silicone caulking, hot melt glue, etc...? Thanks for any help Im getting ready to construct my x-overs in separate compartment of enclosure.
 

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Just to start off i don't have allot of experience in this area but i am about to build my first crossover next week and have done allot of reseach on this. I think solder will always be a better connection and is recommended over a crimp connection. The silver solder should still be alright but what searching has told me that CARDAS QUAD EUTECTIC SOLDER is the best thing out there. Do a search for this kind of solder in the mission possible section at the HTguide http://www.htguide.com/forum/forumdisplay.php4?f=6 and you will find allot of useful information. Hot glue would probably be the best with some cable ties in some areas that might be needed like for the inductors. Industrial velcro would be a good way to mount the crossover board.
 

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First question is it better to crimp connections on X-overs or solder?


I crimp terminals to secure the wire, then solder it. If you just want to solder two

wires, twist them, then solder.


Your solder should work.

searching has told me that CARDAS QUAD EUTECTIC SOLDER is the best thing out there.


You don't need special solder for electronics projects. Generic 60/40 rosin core has been

working fine for as long as dinosaurs roamed. lol ...

what is the best way to mount x-over components
http://www.humblehomemadehifi.com/HA...n/image024.jpg
 

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Cardas quad-eutectic is resommend for several reasons, not the least of which is that it flows so well, it's virtually impossible even for a complete soldering n00b to make a cold-solder joint.


The shelf life of solder is a long time.


Standard silver solders are more difficult to work with since their melting point is higher.


For smaller lighter weight components hot glue works well for mounting XO components.

 

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I never seen a noob have problems using 60/40 solder if the soldering iron is at the

proper heat. If people are buying 25w irons, then that is too low in heat. You should get

~40w irons with good tips and clean the tips often with a water soaked sponge. You don't need silver solder either.
 

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Justin the HTGuide is really the place to ask these kind of questions. There is just alot more people there that work on crossover's which should result in more feedback. Again if you search Cardas quad-eutectic at the quide you will find some good info on soldering staions too.
 

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Justin the HTGuide is really the place to ask these kind of questions.




Akin to saying... "If you want to learn about audio, go to the Bose fan forum"



If you want a very good soldering station, this one will work just

as good as the $200 ones. Variable 5W to 40W. I use setting #4 most

of the time.

http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=372-120
 

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First, a good solder joint is better than a good crimp joint is better than a bad solder joint. So make good solder joints.


For soldering crossovers together, the standard 40w radio shack iron is fine - don't bother with an expensive station for hobbyist work. If you have an electronics supply shop in town, go there and ask for one of their $10 or so irons, they will be better than the RS iron and they will have a wider selection of solder too. For XO work you want a fairly large tip on the iron because you'll be heating well heatsinked joints since XO's use fairly thick copper wire (14ga inductors and whatnot) and the big tip will get heat to the joint faster. FWIW I use a $500 Weller station at work, and the 40 watt radio shack iron at home for my speaker stuff. So trust me, cheap irons are fine.


Also, use standard 63/37 rosin core (RA or RMA type) solder. No need for fancier blends or silver solder. I used 60/40 for ages til I started my new job and switched to 63/37. I tried using some 60/40 a few weeks back for xo work and that plastic stage is a ***** once you're used to eutectic stuff.


Also, pick up a small thing of paste flux. If you have trouble getting solder to wet on a joint properly, smudge some onto it and then try. It'll fix a lot of problems if you've got any oxidation on wires.
 

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Yes good solder is better, the lesson I remember from long ago and Heath kits and other early learning was that any good solder joint starts with a good mechanical connection. You cannot get two copper wires too close together for hot solder to penetrate but you can have many problems if you rely on solder to create or support the mechanical connection. In most cases don't rely on the solder to hold the wire in place. The solder only improves and seals a good mechanical connection. Inside equipment heating and cooling stresses connections and in speakers vibration is the stress agent good mechanical support mitigates this failure prone area. Solder does not hold up when subject to thermal or mechanical stress. In conjunction with good mechanical support solder improves conductivity greatly.


My post rambles a lot but areas where I have worked some soldered systems were 40 years old and working fine.


nater
 
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