AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,282 Posts
Here's some comparisons....

Both antennas comes with a reversed splitter that serves as the combiner for the two panels. The unit on the HDB8X is a pretty cheap one, the one on the DB8e is a very good splitter that comes with a nice weatherproof enclosure.

The HDB8X is tuned for the old UHF band (it's a Chinese design that hasn't been updated, see http://www.qiaohua.com/products/av-0948dt.htm). The DB8e is tuned for the "new" (now 6 years old) North American UHF band.

The DB8e has a lifetime warranty. Solid Signal gives you 6 months.

Solid Signal gives two gain claims: Under the specifications, it says 23 dB which is pretty ridiculous. Elsewhere, they say it's 17.5 dB, but their gain vs frequency chart (under "Documents") shows that the peak gain is actually up in the unused real estate between 775 and 800 MHz. Solid Signal also claims a 60° beamwidth which is also improbable for an 8-bay antenna. There's a comprehensive data sheet for the DB8e which includes calculated gain patterns for various panel aiming directions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,986 Posts
I heard it comes with a UHF only combiner, so I intend on replacing that with a UHF/VHF combiner.
Don't do that; the two devices are not equivalent. Both antennas use a splitter in reverse as a combiner. A UHF/VHF combiner, AKA UVSJ, is a diplexer used to combine a UHF antenna with a VHF antenna.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,647 Posts
..... I heard it comes with a UHF only combiner, so I intend on replacing that with a UHF/VHF combiner.
Don't do that; the two devices are not equivalent. Both antennas use a splitter in reverse as a combiner. A UHF/VHF combiner, AKA UVSJ, is a diplexer used to combine a UHF antenna with a VHF antenna.
I believe he's talking about a "combiner"(or splitter in reverse) rated for UHF/VHF as apposed to one only rated for UHF?? Although wouldn't a combiner(splitter) rated for UHF also work for lower VHF? Not like an antenna that can be tuned for a specific band, I believe with with components after the antenna(splitters, wiring, etc.) you purchase them for the highest frequency you expect to use which also includes lower frequencies.

Oh and not to get this threat OT but from reading SS's website it looks like they also sell a Antennas Direct DB8(as apposed to the DB8e) which seems to have better reviews(although the DB8e has very very few reviews) but the DB8 seems to have basically all good reviews, and is ~$50 cheaper than the DB8e....any thought? I have VHF 9 and 11 in my market but I'm in a pretty strong signal area(~15 miles from towers).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Don't do that; the two devices are not equivalent. Both antennas use a splitter in reverse as a combiner. A UHF/VHF combiner, AKA UVSJ, is a diplexer used to combine a UHF antenna with a VHF antenna.
The reason I was aiming to do that, is I read a review on Solid Signal that the HDB8X comes with a UHF only combiner, and will work decently for high VHF if a combiner is used that works for both UHF and VHF. Was aiming for a splitter/combiner that passes power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,986 Posts
I believe with with components after the antenna(splitters, wiring, etc.) you purchase them for the highest frequency you expect to use which also includes lower frequencies.
The baluns in the older antennas were the ferrite core hybrid type that worked well for UHF and VHF. The baluns in the newer antennas are the printed circuit board type that work well for UHF, but have high loss for VHF.

Hi-VHF Raw Gain plots show a reasonable amount of Gain, with more toward the REAR. SWR is very excessive, which may or may not cause problems, esp. on weak channels. However, a couple years ago A-D changed to a PCB Balun (vice usual Hybrid Transformer) which has very high loss on VHF frequencies....so Hi-VHF charts only apply to old versions.
http://imageevent.com/holl_ands/yagis/91xg

The antenna elements are too small to have any response to VHF. And in case a really strong VHF signal sneaks in anyway, the UHF-only balun will filter it out. The manufacturer’s web site used to specify this antenna for channel 7-69.
http://www.hdtvprimer.com/antennas/temporarypage.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I believe he's talking about a "combiner"(or splitter in reverse) rated for UHF/VHF as apposed to one only rated for UHF?? Although wouldn't a combiner(splitter) rated for UHF also work for lower VHF? Not like an antenna that can be tuned for a specific band, I believe with with components after the antenna(splitters, wiring, etc.) you purchase them for the highest frequency you expect to use which also includes lower frequencies.

Oh and not to get this threat OT but from reading SS's website it looks like they also sell a Antennas Direct DB8(as apposed to the DB8e) which seems to have better reviews(although the DB8e has very very few reviews) but the DB8 seems to have basically all good reviews, and is ~$50 cheaper than the DB8e....any thought? I have VHF 9 and 11 in my market but I'm in a pretty strong signal area(~15 miles from towers).
A review on SS for the HDB8X said:
Well made, has the potential for great deep-fringe reception, but high wind resistance can pose problems.
14470 - Holley, NY - 1/19/2015
A very good antenna, sturdy, strong reception from stations over 80 miles away, but keep these things in mind to avoid a lot of frustration:
1. Due to shape, it&aposs like a sail, there is a fair amount of wind resistance compared to yagi design. Mine was up 10&apos on a heavy-duty mast (not guyed) and 60 mph wind gusts bent the mast, never happened with the all-channel yagi monster it replaced.
2. Despite the claims, the bowtie design is intrinsically UHF, but this one will work decently for high VHF if the combiner is replaced with a VHF/UHF model (do a search on eBay), the one provided on the antenna is for UHF frequency band only.
3. Extremely sensitive to movement, signal strength fluctuates wildly if the antenna moves the slightest bit in the wind, probably due to its being highly directional, which results in deep-fringe range ability but it must be rock-stable.

So #2 , is what I was basing this off of. And I have no clue if VHF could be passed through a so-called only UHF combiner. But this guy said it doesn't pass VHF.
Aim for was for this item:

http://www.amazon.com/CHANNEL-2512-...TF8&qid=1429710831&sr=1-1&keywords=B00006JPEA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,647 Posts
The baluns in the older antennas were the ferrite core hybrid type that worked well for UHF and VHF. The baluns in the newer antennas are the printed circuit board type that work well for UHF, but have high loss for VHF.
Interesting, in that case I be inclined to do what rockin1jr was thinking, purchase a decent splitter rated for both UHF and VHF. Thanks for the correction, yes I'm more familiar with the older ferrite core products and not the printed circuit type.

A review on SS for the HDB8X said:
Well made, has the potential for great deep-fringe reception, but high wind resistance can pose problems.
14470 - Holley, NY - 1/19/2015
A very good antenna, sturdy, strong reception from stations over 80 miles away, but keep these things in mind to avoid a lot of frustration:
1. Due to shape, it&aposs like a sail, there is a fair amount of wind resistance compared to yagi design. Mine was up 10&apos on a heavy-duty mast (not guyed) and 60 mph wind gusts bent the mast, never happened with the all-channel yagi monster it replaced.
2. Despite the claims, the bowtie design is intrinsically UHF, but this one will work decently for high VHF if the combiner is replaced with a VHF/UHF model (do a search on eBay), the one provided on the antenna is for UHF frequency band only.
3. Extremely sensitive to movement, signal strength fluctuates wildly if the antenna moves the slightest bit in the wind, probably due to its being highly directional, which results in deep-fringe range ability but it must be rock-stable.

So #2 , is what I was basing this off of. And I have no clue if VHF could be passed through a so-called only UHF combiner. But this guy said it doesn't pass VHF.
Aim for was for this item:

http://www.amazon.com/CHANNEL-2512-...TF8&qid=1429710831&sr=1-1&keywords=B00006JPEA
In my case I'd prefer to mount in the attic so wind load is of no concern and to me a very directional antenna is preferable as basically all my stations come from one place and I'm more concerned about multipath which a narrow beam antenna should help.
Sounds like the HDB8X may be a cost effective option for me and actually since I'm having a bit of a problem with FM overload a antenna like this may help with that as it's FM gain is probably quite low, so it would act like a FM filter, better than my current UHF/VHF antenna anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,986 Posts
The reason I was aiming to do that, is I read a review on Solid Signal that the HDB8X comes with a UHF only combiner, and will work decently for high VHF if a combiner is used that works for both UHF and VHF. Was aiming for a splitter/combiner that passes power.
That might work. All 2-way splitters are rated for UHF and VHF, but don't confuse it with a UVSJ which is also called a UFH/VHF combiner when you buy it.

Why do you want it to pass power if it is located between the baluns and the coax feedline?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I believe he's talking about a "combiner"(or splitter in reverse) rated for UHF/VHF as apposed to one only rated for UHF?? Although wouldn't a combiner(splitter) rated for UHF also work for lower VHF? Not like an antenna that can be tuned for a specific band, I believe with with components after the antenna(splitters, wiring, etc.) you purchase them for the highest frequency you expect to use which also includes lower frequencies.

Oh and not to get this threat OT but from reading SS's website it looks like they also sell a Antennas Direct DB8(as apposed to the DB8e) which seems to have better reviews(although the DB8e has very very few reviews) but the DB8 seems to have basically all good reviews, and is ~$50 cheaper than the DB8e....any thought? I have VHF 9 and 11 in my market but I'm in a pretty strong signal area(~15 miles from towers).
That might work. All 2-way splitters are rated for UHF and VHF, but don't confuse it with a UVSJ which is also called a UFH/VHF combiner when you buy it.

Why do you want it to pass power if it is located between the baluns and the coax feedline?
Well I really wouldn't need to. I aim to use it to replace the combiner on the HDB8X, then the line out of the combiner would be a short RG6 that would go into the preamp on the mast. The power passing model is only 52 cents more though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,986 Posts
Sounds like the HDB8X may be a cost effective option for me and actually since I'm having a bit of a problem with FM overload a antenna like this may help with that as it's FM gain is probably quite low, so it would act like a FM filter, better than my current UHF/VHF antenna anyway.
Yes, it would probably make FM weaker, but do you have any VHF-High signals you need to receive?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, it would probably make FM weaker, but do you have any VHF-High signals you need to receive?
I don't have issues here with local FM or tv towers for interference. But for VHF high band, I have one 25 miles out, and 2 45 miles out. It would be nice to get the one from 25 miles, but it's not necessary. I really want the PBS out of Pittsburgh but that's VHF high and I don't plan on it with that antenna.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,111 Posts
Here's some comparisons....

Both antennas comes with a reversed splitter that serves as the combiner for the two panels. The unit on the HDB8X is a pretty cheap one, the one on the DB8e is a very good splitter that comes with a nice weatherproof enclosure.

The HDB8X is tuned for the old UHF band (it's a Chinese design that hasn't been updated, see http://www.qiaohua.com/products/av-0948dt.htm). The DB8e is tuned for the "new" (now 6 years old) North American UHF band.

The DB8e has a lifetime warranty. Solid Signal gives you 6 months.

Solid Signal gives two gain claims: Under the specifications, it says 23 dB which is pretty ridiculous. Elsewhere, they say it's 17.5 dB, but their gain vs frequency chart (under "Documents") shows that the peak gain is actually up in the unused real estate between 775 and 800 MHz. Solid Signal also claims a 60° beamwidth which is also improbable for an 8-bay antenna. There's a comprehensive data sheet for the DB8e which includes calculated gain patterns for various panel aiming directions.
curious, whats the "old UHF band" and the "new UHF band"? what changed in the spectrum that makes them old and new?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,559 Posts
I don't have issues here with local FM or tv towers for interference. But for VHF high band, I have one 25 miles out, and 2 45 miles out. It would be nice to get the one from 25 miles, but it's not necessary. I really want the PBS out of Pittsburgh but that's VHF high and I don't plan on it with that antenna.
This is another reception thread in disguise. Please post a link to your TV Fool report as requested in the sticky at the top of this forum.

The HDB8X is another 8 bay antenna and unless there's some basic design flaw it'll perform the same as all the 8 bay antennas. There's no magic to make one version perform better than another. Mileage claims mean little. That's all marketing. The only thing the mileage is telling you is that the antenna is a poor performer on high VHF. This is not news since it is a UHF antenna. The HDB8X is a clone of the DB8e and the higher cost just allows you point the two halves in different directions. That's probably where the 60 degree beamwidth claim is coming from.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top