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Discussion Starter #1
My Harmon kardon avr1700 seems to be working properly but its not near as loud as my last avr on the same speakers and that avr was rated for 50 percent less power. Idk if I have a setting wrong with it or what? Seems like its got to be turned up 3/4 to make the speakers really sound good. Pushing 2 klipsch f30 in stereo mode.
 

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If it's calibrated, your AV at -20dB would be exactly the same as mine at -20dB that has 180W per channel.
 

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Hmm calibrated? I just did the manual speaker set up. Set up front left and right wich is all I have. Are you talking about plugging in the microphone and calibrating that way.
 

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Yep. Unless a system is calibrated so you know how loud it is at s gjven volume control setting the volume control setting means exactly nothing about the power being used. So worrying about your volume control setting is utterly pointless.
 

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Okay so you would reccomend me calibrating it via microphone. Will it allow me to with just the 2 speakers? And it should help with the volume level?
 

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Reason I ask is because in the manual it says to set speakers up manually if not using 5.1 if I read correctly
 

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Plug the mic in and run the setup software. That will properly detect what speakers are connected and set proper distance and volume level match. It will also create a room eq. That eq can be bypassed if desired. Rerun the mic setup any time speakers are moved or added etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bretzy1990  /t/1527078/something-wrong-with-avr#post_24600474


Okay so you would reccomend me calibrating it via microphone. Will it allow me to with just the 2 speakers? And it should help with the volume level?

the volume control setting doesn't matter, so it will neither help nor hurt. To get "too loud" (at 85 dB test tones, consumers complained so manufacturers changed to 75 dB test tones) at 85 dB is not going to take more than a watt or two. the speakers react to voltage, not to the volume control readout (they actually cannot see the volume control readout, onaccounta they don't have eyes). It will take the exact same amount of power to achieve that SPL whether your volume control says 20 or 90. to get twice as loud (at 95 dB) will take ten times more power, so up to 20 watts,say. I don't ever listen above -10 dB from reference, so that's all the power I ever need. If I was not calibrated to reference, I would use the exact same amount of power whether my volume control readout said 50 or 90. To play back at normal conversation level (around 65 dB) likely uses all of .02 watts. Again, regardless of volume control setting. Speakers WILL play as loud as the incoming voltage (power) tells them to, and no louder or quieter, and the volume control setting number, unless you know it's set up to refer to some real SPL or power, simply means zero. Zero. Means nothing.
 
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