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I do know that Sony followed up with a modified model (960N) that doesn't have the coating so probably no biggie.
 

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Sorry for the thread necro, but much of what I'm talking about is stuff I learned here.

Short version: Other than removing the bezel, is there a way to tell whether you have the film or the coating antiglare?

Long version: My antiglare has started to wear away in spots despite using only water and microfiber cloths for cleaning over the past decade. Therefore, I wanted to remove the remainder if the AG for uniformity.

Due to its appearance and some of my research, I was convinced I had the coating AG, not the film. The Magic Eraser method seemed to work, though it required a lot of hard scrubbing with Steel Wool #0000 . However, the screen looks cloudy, so it looks like the Magic Eraser couldn't quite take everything off.

Someone (here? elsewhere?) swore by WD40. Research said it was safe on glass, so I tried a bit on one of the cloudier areas, letting it sit for a few minutes. The cloudy, slightly smeary area I tested it on just seemed to grow smearier. And then I noticed a small indentation seemed to have appeared, as if the "glass" had been etched.

So now I suspect that I have the film, after all. But I'd really like to know for sure before I go taking an Xacto knife to my screen or popping off the giant case. I would be grateful for any advice.
 

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Long ago I worked for a car window tinter and we would remove old film with razor blades and soapy water. Then we used Pine-Sol to remove the glue.

I thought all of these AG models used a film but I'm no expert on this subject. Unfortunately you might have to read back through this thread as I think most of these folks are long gone. Seems like there were a couple of real good how to posts although there may be other threads on the subject in AVS.
 

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Thanks for the reply. Additional research (including looking at page 2 of the Owner's Manual where it says there is a film being used, duh) has now made me think I have the film. But when I tried the Xacto knife method in a corner of the screen, it feels and sounds like I'm scoring glass. It even looks like there might be a slight glittery trail where I cut. And I swear to God, I didn't press that hard.

So now I'm frozen with indecision. It seems like my last option is the one I really, really, really don't want to do: take the case off and try to remove the bezel enough to see if there is a small portion of the film sticking up from the corner of the screen like some have described, and, if so, try to yank it off without damaging any of the internal electronics. I found the Service Manual and removing the back case looks clear enough, but it seems like there might be some guess work on how to remove the bezel from the screen. On the off chance the film is there and I can remove it without damaging the screen or myself, there's no guarantee I won't knock something else in the TV out of alignment and create a worse problem.

The TV has endured for almost 10 years, including an interstate and then an intratown move. I'd really hate for its downfall to be some splotches of aging, faulty antiglare.
 

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I have never removed antiglare film from any Trinitron tube. However, any time I see a testimonial, the best method that the most people seem to have found is steel wool. Almost every single person who mentions it says that they thought it was crazy, until they actually did it, and that it just magically removes the stuff without damaging the glass. A little paper towel rub afterwards, maybe some googone if you have sticky stuff left behind and you have a nice, bright, cataract-free CRT again. Some posters in this very thread have mentioned the same method, but I have come across it in other threads here and elsewhere in CRT discussions. Honestly, if I needed to do that I would still remove the bezel to be thorough, but the 0000 grade steel wool should not damage the glass. There were also models made of various XBRs that specifically did not have the antiglare film. Perhaps you have one of those?
 

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Try searching this thread using their search function using the keywords bezel and steel wool, should land you on those posts.

I was assuming you have a 960 but if it has an N on the end of the model number then it doesn't have the AG.

"cataract-free CRT" :D
 

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Thanks for the reply. Additional research (including looking at page 2 of the Owner's Manual where it says there is a film being used, duh) has now made me think I have the film. But when I tried the Xacto knife method in a corner of the screen, it feels and sounds like I'm scoring glass. It even looks like there might be a slight glittery trail where I cut. And I swear to God, I didn't press that hard.

So now I'm frozen with indecision. It seems like my last option is the one I really, really, really don't want to do: take the case off and try to remove the bezel enough to see if there is a small portion of the film sticking up from the corner of the screen like some have described, and, if so, try to yank it off without damaging any of the internal electronics. I found the Service Manual and removing the back case looks clear enough, but it seems like there might be some guess work on how to remove the bezel from the screen. On the off chance the film is there and I can remove it without damaging the screen or myself, there's no guarantee I won't knock something else in the TV out of alignment and create a worse problem.

The TV has endured for almost 10 years, including an interstate and then an intratown move. I'd really hate for its downfall to be some splotches of aging, faulty antiglare.
Recently picked up a used 2004 960(so not the "n" model) and it had a damaged section of the screen in the anit-glare film. So I searched around and came across this thread. I too, started messing around WAY down in a corner with an exacto knife, and it did seem like I was scoring glass, and leaving glittery stuff everywhere. I'm happy to report, to have no fear it's just the INCREDIBLY thick anti-glare film. It IS glass underneath... I took all the gold headed phillips screws out of the back of cabinet ( identified with an =>) and separated the back of the cabinet, then removed all the smaller headed phillips screws that secure the front black plastic bezel that I could get(not two or three of the bottom ones). Then picked at a corner of the film extending beyond the curved top corner of the screen(while pulling the black plastic bezel out of the way) and slowly over the course of an hour peeled it off in one giant piece...You do NOT want to try to rub through this stuff of buff it off. You MUST peel it!
 

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Recently picked up a used 2004 960(so not the "n" model) and it had a damaged section of the screen in the anit-glare film. So I searched around and came across this thread. I too, started messing around WAY down in a corner with an exacto knife, and it did seem like I was scoring glass, and leaving glittery stuff everywhere. I'm happy to report, to have no fear it's just the INCREDIBLY thick anti-glare film. It IS glass underneath... I took all the gold headed phillips screws out of the back of cabinet ( identified with an =>) and separated the back of the cabinet, then removed all the smaller headed phillips screws that secure the front black plastic bezel that I could get(not two or three of the bottom ones). Then picked at a corner of the film extending beyond the curved top corner of the screen(while pulling the black plastic bezel out of the way) and slowly over the course of an hour peeled it off in one giant piece...You do NOT want to try to rub through this stuff of buff it off. You MUST peel it!
Greetings,
Thanks for the report. I've had my 960 for many years now and my film has numerous damages. Though it's no longer my main display, I still use it for gaming. I'm not very handy, but one of these days, I might find the time to remove it.
 

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Great to hear you got it done. However:

You do NOT want to try to rub through this stuff of buff it off. You MUST peel it!
The above for against every testimonial of success from persons who rubbed their film off with steel wool. I would not want to counter so many of these testimonials without seeing it for yourself.
 

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Yeah, I found alot of
"scrubbing off" testimonies, and alot of conflicting info on the subject, so I'm just reporting on my experience WITH a 960. If anyone has ever peeled off this exact film from this exact set, I can't imagine them ever saying to themselves "huh, shoulda just scrubbed it off". When I say thick, I mean THICK. I can't even imagine it is possible to scrub through this stuff completely with anything, let alone that fine steel wool. It seemed many who reported scrubbing it off, were talking about different set, or even a different manufacturer! I'm just relaying current, accurate, information regarding my 960(man 2004). There is nothing I could be cajoled with to try to rub one of these off versus peeling. NOTHING.
 

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I couldn't find any current info on teardown of the cabinet to allow removal of the AG film except for the one guy above. He says to remove all the screws to separate the back plastic cabinet. That's correct. Then he says to remove the large bolt inside up in the corner. I would NOT recommend this. This will not facilitate removal of the front black bezel. This is one of four bolts that secures the tube itself to the cabinet. Instead, remove all the smaller headed phillips screws around the perimeter. This will allow enough room to pull the black bezel out of your way to get started on peeling off a corner of the film. Also, word or warning: It is best to peel the "film" off. If you do attempt this, be aware the "film" is SO thick, it can/will shred your hands around it's perimeter. I had blood ALL over the damn place by the time I got it all peeled off. GET GLOVES!
 

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Yeah, I found alot of
"scrubbing off" testimonies, and alot of conflicting info on the subject, so I'm just reporting on my experience WITH a 960. If anyone has ever peeled off this exact film from this exact set, I can't imagine them ever saying to themselves "huh, shoulda just scrubbed it off". When I say thick, I mean THICK. I can't even imagine it is possible to scrub through this stuff completely with anything, let alone that fine steel wool. It seemed many who reported scrubbing it off, were talking about different set, or even a different manufacturer! I'm just relaying current, accurate, information regarding my 960(man 2004). There is nothing I could be cajoled with to try to rub one of these off versus peeling. NOTHING.
I'm thinking you didn't read THIS thread fully. The originator of this thread solved his problem, guess how? By removing the film with 0000 steel wool. With THIS TV. The 960.
 

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I guess both methods could work. Take your best shot and good luck. ;)
 

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All the OP's original posts and replies are blank to me...But if he did it with a 960 and fine steel wool, more power to him. I'm just giving my opinion on the quicker and more easy way. After seeing how thick the film is(~.54mm) rubbing it off with anything is not something I would ever consider. EVER. My mind draws the analogy of trying to rub a hole in a credit card with a piece of velvet...I'm not here to dump on anyone or anything, just trying to provide more/better details to someone who is searching for answers.
 

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I think they peeled the film off and used the steel wool to remove the glue residue. Some if not most would start the peel by cutting (X-acto knife, etc.) the film right at the bezel without removing the bezel.
 

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I think they peeled the film off and used the steel wool to remove the glue residue. Some if not most would start the peel by cutting (X-acto knife, etc.) the film right at the bezel without removing the bezel.
THAT finally makes some sense to me...I didn't have any residue left behind, but I also didn't use a heat gun or anything...I initially tried starting down in the corner with an exacto blade...I kept snapping tips off and a glittery trail was left behind, and I was unsure what to think(after reading thru many threads)...
 

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I'm thinking there were two versions of film, thought I read that in a post(s). It does seem like Sony was having issues with the stuff, I mean they came out with the 960N with No film. Or did they just produce both simultaneously to satisfy both types of customers? That would seem to have been cost-prohibitive. I noticed the same thing with the 955 model although I think that was a short-lived model with the 960 coming out; I sure don't see much activity on the 955 here in the CRT forum, mostly 960s and 970s.

Edit: After digging around it appears they were out at the same time, the 955 (XS) being a more economical version of the 960 (XBR). So it seems there'd be more 955s out there than 960s (one poster wrote that he saw 955s for sale widespread but 960s only at high-end stores).
I stumbled across a safety hazard warning from the 955 manual not to remove the film as it provides some sort of safety feature but it didn't explain what that is.

Speaking of which, I just accidentally broke the glass of my sliding glass door after shutting it too hard (old glass, hard to slide, and I think the frame was getting loose around the glass). Tempered glass so it's now thousands of little pieces. But get this, it's still in place as there's tint film on one side and I suspect sufficient inter-piece pressure (I experienced the same thing when something struck one of my conversion van picture windows that have no tint film). Weird right after it happened, could hear little pops for quite some time, some of it from tiny glass splinters popping out.
 

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"Warning" in the 960 manual too:

http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0LEVzmBCbhU3oYAVDxXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEzYWhlMWs4BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA2JmMQR2dGlkA1ZJUDMwMV8x/RV=2/RE=1421376002/RO=10/RU=http%3a%2f%2fwww.docs.sony.com%2frelease%2fKD34XBR960.pdf/RK=0/RS=7lW41mWkn_SxA8shqolJcKTnH4M-

I couldn't copy&paste from the PDF but it states:

"Warning
The CRT in this product employs a protective film on the face. This film must not be removed as it serves a safety function and removal will increase the risk of serious injury."

Serious injury, seriously!? I'd love to hear more from Sony on this.
 
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