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Discussion Starter #1
Now that members are receiving Sony's new A1E OLED, I thought it would be a good idea to start a thread dealing with the calibration of this set. I'll be getting one in a couple of days and will post what I find. Please use this thread to post any calibration related discoveries, methods, processes or results to fine tune the picture quality of this set.

For those DIY's and pros, it would be interesting to explore things such as determining if Sony's picture processing does any better in near black detail, low ire CMS, and peak luminance as compared to the LG which uses the same panel. Is it better to use Expert 1 or Expert 2 for HDR? How's the best way to manage the SDR and HDR picture mode settings in relation to storing the calibration? How accurate is the CMS? Do we need to raise the 0% black level in the calibration software such as Calman, like we did on the LG to get the set to come out of black faster? What's the best way to calibrate Cinema Home and Pro and HDR10 and some day, Dolby Vision on this set?


Please keep the topic focused on the A1 but comparisons to the LG for a point of reference is also welcome. Maybe if we share our experiences, we can develop the best calibration process for this set and learn something at the same time.
 

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Now that members are receiving Sony's new A1E OLED, I thought it would be a good idea to start a thread dealing with the calibration of this set. I'll be getting one in a couple of days and will post what I find. Please use this thread to post any calibration related discoveries, methods, processes or results to fine tune the picture quality of this set.



For those DIY's and pros, it would be interesting to explore things such as determining if Sony's picture processing does any better in near black detail, low ire CMS, and peak luminance as compared to the LG which uses the same panel. Is it better to use Expert 1 or Expert 2 for HDR? How's the best way to manage the SDR and HDR picture mode settings in relation to storing the calibration? How accurate is the CMS? Do we need to raise the 0% black level in the calibration software such as Calman, like we did on the LG to get the set to come out of black faster? What's the best way to calibrate Cinema Home and Pro and HDR10 and some day, Dolby Vision on this set?





Please keep the topic focused on the A1 but comparisons to the LG for a point of reference is also welcome. Maybe if we share our experiences, we can develop the best calibration process for this set and learn something at the same time.


Looking forward to some hard data :)


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Discussion Starter #4
In preparation for the calibration discussion, i'm re-posting a great review of the LG vs the Sony to point out the picture processing that Sony is performing so we can discuss how it might effect SDR and HDR calibration. Only the picture processing related parts of the review are below.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Review: Sony XBR65A1E, XBR55A1E (A1E)

The subject of this review is the Sony XBR65A1E. Since the 65-inch and the 55-inch class models have identical features, the following review applies to the XBR55A1E as well. Both of them are members of the A1E series of Sony OLED TVs.

The Sony XBR65A1E and the 2017 LG OLED TVs use the latest generation W-OLED panel. The resolution is 3840×2160, meaning there are more than 8 million individual pixels, with each and every one of them producing it own light. However, instead of having sub-pixels that emit distinct red, green and blue, the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs produce dichromatic white light on a pixel level, which necessitates the use of color filters. The dichromatic light source results in less narrow peaks in the green, and especially the red spectral regions in comparison to the blue. Although this doesn’t prevent them from covering the DCI-P3 color space coverage almost entirely, it means that some improvements need to be made to the W-OLED technology in order for any future TVs using these type of panels to be able to fully cover the BT.2020 color space, which is significantly larger than DCI-P3.

Since OLED a self-emissive technology, individual pixels can be completely shut off so that no light is emitted. As a result, both the Sony XBR65A1E and its LG OLED counterparts have a perfect black level of 0 nits, provided there is no ambient light that gets reflected off the screen. At the opposite end of the brightness scale, they can reach approximately 150 nits on a full-field white (100% window size). Therefore, if you calibrate the Sony XBR65A1E or the LG OLED65E7P to the level SDR content is usually mastered to (i.e. 100 nits), the target luminance is achieved not only in small areas of the screen but also during scenes with high average picture level. A typical example of content with preponderance of bright elements is hockey.

Nonetheless, the Auto Brightness Limiter is still present, and starts to function at above 150 nits. It basically means that the larger the brightly illuminated portion of the screen is, the dimmer it gets. However, most SDR content has low-to-mid APL, so it is unlikely to notice any drop in luminance unless the scene is overly bright and you’ve calibrated your TV to more than 150 nits. Furthermore, the Sony XBR65A1E and the LG OLED65E7P can reach more than 300 nits in 50% window size, and more than 400 nits in 25% window size, meaning they can get sufficiently bright for viewing under high ambient light conditions, provided the SDR content doesn’t have high average picture level.

The peak brightness with High Dynamic range (HDR) content varies based on the HDR picture preset you’re using. Some of the HDR picture modes (e.g. Vivid) on the Sony XBR65A1E and LG track the D93 white point more closely, while others (e.g. Standard): the D65 white point. Although tracking the D93 white point provides a peak brightness of up to 1,000 nits in small specular highlights (5% window size), there is some significant blue tint added to the white color. On the other hand, the D65 white point ensures more neutral color temperature, but the peak brightness in small specular highlights (5% window size) is only up to 800 nits.

One of the HDR formats that the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs support is HDR10. The transfer function used with the HDR10 is called Perceptual Quantizer (PQ). The digital code words in the 10-bit HDR10 signal correspond to specific luminance values, regardless of the actual brightness capability of the TV. In other words the PQ is an absolute transfer function. When the HDR10 content is mastered to a brightness level unattainable by the Sony XBR65A1E and LG, they resort to tone-mapping in order to quantize the dynamic range of the content. The tone-mapping process is not standardized, though. This means that there is a difference in how the Sony XBR65A1E and LG implement the PQ EOTF (Electro-Optical Transfer Function), especially at higher stimulus levels.

HDR10 content mastered to 4,000 nits requires the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs to perform more tone-mapping than 1,000 nit HDR10 content, so this is where the difference between them is most prominent. Specifically, the LG OLED65E7P tends to start rolling-off the luminance a bit earlier than the Sony XBR65A1E, which allows for more detail in the highlights to be resolved, but also causes some tones in the diffuse white region to be rendered slightly darker in comparison to the Sony XBR65A1E.

It also needs to be said that HDR10 content is only optimized for scenes with highlights due to the fact that static metadata defines maxCLL (maximum content light level) which doesn’t change for the entire duration of the content. In an attempt to rectify this, the 2017 LG OLED TVs utilize Active HDR processing for analyzing individual frames, and generating dynamic metadata on the fly. The Sony XBR65A1E’s Dynamic Contrast Enhancer also performs frame-by-frame optimization. The setting which controls the Active HDR processing on the LG is called Dynamic Contrast, and it can be set to Low, Medium, High or Off, so you can find the right balance between preventing the dynamic range from being unnecessary compressed during scenes without highlights, on the one hand, and avoiding any further alternation of the director’s intended look (besides the one already introduced by the tone-mapping), on the other.

There is no such dilemma with Dolby Vision content because the dynamic metadata is generated during post-production, so it conforms director’s intentions. Another advantage over the HDR10 is that the Dolby’s mapping engine is aware of the specific characteristics (such as peak brightness, color volume, etc) of the display, meaning it can provide better tone-mapping. The LG OLED TVs support Dolby Vision out of the box whereas the Sony XBR65A1E requires a future firmware update to enable support for this format. According to Sony, the update will be available later this year. It will also bring support for HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma), which is a different format of HDR aimed primarily at TV broadcasts, to the Sony XBR65A1E. The 2017 LG OLED TVs support HLG out of the box.

Considering that color bit depth and DCI-P3 gamut coverage are tied to the panel of the TV, rather than video processing, it’s not surprising that color rendition is mostly identical on the Sony XBR65A1E and LG. The panel bit depth is 10-bit, meaning both of them are able to show more than a billion color shades. The DCI-P3 color space coverage is approximately 99% for the mid-tones, and slightly lower for specular highlights that are above 1,000 nits. Therefore, the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs do not render some of the brightest colors in specular highlight as vivid as they should be. Unlike the Sony XBR65A1E, the LG OLED TVs have a Color Management System, so you can adjust saturation, tint and luminance independently for the primary colors. Although this may improve the color accuracy, it doesn’t lead to an expansion in the DCI-P3 coverage.

Neither of them has any significant trouble with the transition from black to dark gray, which was somewhat problematic with earlier OLED TVs. The smooth near-black gradation is a result from both improvements in the panel itself, as well as the fact the processing is done at a higher bit depth, so that quantazation errors can be avoided. Specifically, the Sony XBR65A1E features Super Bit Mapping, which upconverts 8-bit or 10-bit source content for 14-bit processing. The Smooth Gradation menu setting controls it. The LG OLED TVs also resorts to processing content at a higher bit depth in order to prevent macroblocking artifacts near-black. The black level setting is non-linear in order to provide more granular control over the transition from black to dark gray.

One of the areas where the more advanced video processing on Sony XBR65A1E vs LG becomes apparent is upscaling lower resolution content to 4K resolution. This is attributed to the fact that the X1 Extreme image processor on the Sony XBR65A1E can access tens of thousands picture patterns in two databases. One of the Sony’s propriety databases is dedicated to noise reduction while the other is for super resolution (i.e. enhancing the clarity of upscaled content). The before and after data references allow the Sony XBR65A1E to identify compression noise and other artifacts in the source, and remove them in an optimal way. Whilst not quite on par with the Sony XBR65A1E, the LG upscaling is also good. Furthermore, if you’re watching native 4K content, or even some pristine quality 1080p content, such as Blu-ray discs, the difference between the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED65E7P is minimal.

The enhanced video processing on the Sony XBR65A1E also leads to less visible artifacts when the motion compensated frame interpolation is engaged. Although this model is not impulse driven (like plasma TVs were), the nearly instantaneous pixel response time and the 120Hz native refresh rate, which LG OLED TVs also have, prevent fast moving objects from having dark trails. Since individual frames remain on the screen until the next refresh – a method known as sample-and-hold, and used by both the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs, some blurring is still possible, depending on the specific content. The reason is that your eyes are moving as they track an object traveling across the screen whereas the frame doesn’t change until the next refresh, which happens every 8.3 ms for 120Hz TVs.

The Object-based HDR remaster is applied across most of the Sony XBR65A1E SDR picture presets in order for color and contrast of non-HDR content, such as Blu-ray discs, DVDs, and TV broadcasts to be enhanced. On the other hand, LG OLED TVs have a dedicated picture preset called HDR Effect. The advantage to the Sony XBR65A1E’s method of individually analyzing and remastering objects is that the average picture level doesn’t need to lowered significantly in order to provide headroom for highlights, which LG OLED TVs are somewhat prone to when HDR Effect is used.

The Sony XBR65A1E uses Android TV (version 6.0) whereas 2017 LG OLED TVs rely on the WebOS 3.5 system for their smart TV capabilities. The Sony XBR65A1E allows you to access compatible apps on Google Play. There is a built-in microphone in the remote and a future firmware update will enable Google Assistant on the Sony XBR65A1E. The LG motion-sensing Magic Remote also has a built-in microphone, and the webOS platform is very intuitive to use.


https://tvevaluate.com/review-sony-xbr65a1e-oled/
 

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In preparation for the calibration discussion, i'm re-posting a great review of the LG vs the Sony to point out the picture processing that Sony is performing so we can discuss how it might effect SDR and HDR calibration. Only the picture processing related parts of the review are below.



>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Review: Sony XBR65A1E, XBR55A1E (A1E)



The subject of this review is the Sony XBR65A1E. Since the 65-inch and the 55-inch class models have identical features, the following review applies to the XBR55A1E as well. Both of them are members of the A1E series of Sony OLED TVs.



The Sony XBR65A1E and the 2017 LG OLED TVs use the latest generation W-OLED panel. The resolution is 3840×2160, meaning there are more than 8 million individual pixels, with each and every one of them producing it own light. However, instead of having sub-pixels that emit distinct red, green and blue, the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs produce dichromatic white light on a pixel level, which necessitates the use of color filters. The dichromatic light source results in less narrow peaks in the green, and especially the red spectral regions in comparison to the blue. Although this doesn’t prevent them from covering the DCI-P3 color space coverage almost entirely, it means that some improvements need to be made to the W-OLED technology in order for any future TVs using these type of panels to be able to fully cover the BT.2020 color space, which is significantly larger than DCI-P3.



Since OLED a self-emissive technology, individual pixels can be completely shut off so that no light is emitted. As a result, both the Sony XBR65A1E and its LG OLED counterparts have a perfect black level of 0 nits, provided there is no ambient light that gets reflected off the screen. At the opposite end of the brightness scale, they can reach approximately 150 nits on a full-field white (100% window size). Therefore, if you calibrate the Sony XBR65A1E or the LG OLED65E7P to the level SDR content is usually mastered to (i.e. 100 nits), the target luminance is achieved not only in small areas of the screen but also during scenes with high average picture level. A typical example of content with preponderance of bright elements is hockey.



Nonetheless, the Auto Brightness Limiter is still present, and starts to function at above 150 nits. It basically means that the larger the brightly illuminated portion of the screen is, the dimmer it gets. However, most SDR content has low-to-mid APL, so it is unlikely to notice any drop in luminance unless the scene is overly bright and you’ve calibrated your TV to more than 150 nits. Furthermore, the Sony XBR65A1E and the LG OLED65E7P can reach more than 300 nits in 50% window size, and more than 400 nits in 25% window size, meaning they can get sufficiently bright for viewing under high ambient light conditions, provided the SDR content doesn’t have high average picture level.



The peak brightness with High Dynamic range (HDR) content varies based on the HDR picture preset you’re using. Some of the HDR picture modes (e.g. Vivid) on the Sony XBR65A1E and LG track the D93 white point more closely, while others (e.g. Standard): the D65 white point. Although tracking the D93 white point provides a peak brightness of up to 1,000 nits in small specular highlights (5% window size), there is some significant blue tint added to the white color. On the other hand, the D65 white point ensures more neutral color temperature, but the peak brightness in small specular highlights (5% window size) is only up to 800 nits.



One of the HDR formats that the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs support is HDR10. The transfer function used with the HDR10 is called Perceptual Quantizer (PQ). The digital code words in the 10-bit HDR10 signal correspond to specific luminance values, regardless of the actual brightness capability of the TV. In other words the PQ is an absolute transfer function. When the HDR10 content is mastered to a brightness level unattainable by the Sony XBR65A1E and LG, they resort to tone-mapping in order to quantize the dynamic range of the content. The tone-mapping process is not standardized, though. This means that there is a difference in how the Sony XBR65A1E and LG implement the PQ EOTF (Electro-Optical Transfer Function), especially at higher stimulus levels.



HDR10 content mastered to 4,000 nits requires the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs to perform more tone-mapping than 1,000 nit HDR10 content, so this is where the difference between them is most prominent. Specifically, the LG OLED65E7P tends to start rolling-off the luminance a bit earlier than the Sony XBR65A1E, which allows for more detail in the highlights to be resolved, but also causes some tones in the diffuse white region to be rendered slightly darker in comparison to the Sony XBR65A1E.



It also needs to be said that HDR10 content is only optimized for scenes with highlights due to the fact that static metadata defines maxCLL (maximum content light level) which doesn’t change for the entire duration of the content. In an attempt to rectify this, the 2017 LG OLED TVs utilize Active HDR processing for analyzing individual frames, and generating dynamic metadata on the fly. The Sony XBR65A1E’s Dynamic Contrast Enhancer also performs frame-by-frame optimization. The setting which controls the Active HDR processing on the LG is called Dynamic Contrast, and it can be set to Low, Medium, High or Off, so you can find the right balance between preventing the dynamic range from being unnecessary compressed during scenes without highlights, on the one hand, and avoiding any further alternation of the director’s intended look (besides the one already introduced by the tone-mapping), on the other.



There is no such dilemma with Dolby Vision content because the dynamic metadata is generated during post-production, so it conforms director’s intentions. Another advantage over the HDR10 is that the Dolby’s mapping engine is aware of the specific characteristics (such as peak brightness, color volume, etc) of the display, meaning it can provide better tone-mapping. The LG OLED TVs support Dolby Vision out of the box whereas the Sony XBR65A1E requires a future firmware update to enable support for this format. According to Sony, the update will be available later this year. It will also bring support for HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma), which is a different format of HDR aimed primarily at TV broadcasts, to the Sony XBR65A1E. The 2017 LG OLED TVs support HLG out of the box.



Considering that color bit depth and DCI-P3 gamut coverage are tied to the panel of the TV, rather than video processing, it’s not surprising that color rendition is mostly identical on the Sony XBR65A1E and LG. The panel bit depth is 10-bit, meaning both of them are able to show more than a billion color shades. The DCI-P3 color space coverage is approximately 99% for the mid-tones, and slightly lower for specular highlights that are above 1,000 nits. Therefore, the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs do not render some of the brightest colors in specular highlight as vivid as they should be. Unlike the Sony XBR65A1E, the LG OLED TVs have a Color Management System, so you can adjust saturation, tint and luminance independently for the primary colors. Although this may improve the color accuracy, it doesn’t lead to an expansion in the DCI-P3 coverage.



Neither of them has any significant trouble with the transition from black to dark gray, which was somewhat problematic with earlier OLED TVs. The smooth near-black gradation is a result from both improvements in the panel itself, as well as the fact the processing is done at a higher bit depth, so that quantazation errors can be avoided. Specifically, the Sony XBR65A1E features Super Bit Mapping, which upconverts 8-bit or 10-bit source content for 14-bit processing. The Smooth Gradation menu setting controls it. The LG OLED TVs also resorts to processing content at a higher bit depth in order to prevent macroblocking artifacts near-black. The black level setting is non-linear in order to provide more granular control over the transition from black to dark gray.



One of the areas where the more advanced video processing on Sony XBR65A1E vs LG becomes apparent is upscaling lower resolution content to 4K resolution. This is attributed to the fact that the X1 Extreme image processor on the Sony XBR65A1E can access tens of thousands picture patterns in two databases. One of the Sony’s propriety databases is dedicated to noise reduction while the other is for super resolution (i.e. enhancing the clarity of upscaled content). The before and after data references allow the Sony XBR65A1E to identify compression noise and other artifacts in the source, and remove them in an optimal way. Whilst not quite on par with the Sony XBR65A1E, the LG upscaling is also good. Furthermore, if you’re watching native 4K content, or even some pristine quality 1080p content, such as Blu-ray discs, the difference between the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED65E7P is minimal.



The enhanced video processing on the Sony XBR65A1E also leads to less visible artifacts when the motion compensated frame interpolation is engaged. Although this model is not impulse driven (like plasma TVs were), the nearly instantaneous pixel response time and the 120Hz native refresh rate, which LG OLED TVs also have, prevent fast moving objects from having dark trails. Since individual frames remain on the screen until the next refresh – a method known as sample-and-hold, and used by both the Sony XBR65A1E and LG OLED TVs, some blurring is still possible, depending on the specific content. The reason is that your eyes are moving as they track an object traveling across the screen whereas the frame doesn’t change until the next refresh, which happens every 8.3 ms for 120Hz TVs.



The Object-based HDR remaster is applied across most of the Sony XBR65A1E SDR picture presets in order for color and contrast of non-HDR content, such as Blu-ray discs, DVDs, and TV broadcasts to be enhanced. On the other hand, LG OLED TVs have a dedicated picture preset called HDR Effect. The advantage to the Sony XBR65A1E’s method of individually analyzing and remastering objects is that the average picture level doesn’t need to lowered significantly in order to provide headroom for highlights, which LG OLED TVs are somewhat prone to when HDR Effect is used.



The Sony XBR65A1E uses Android TV (version 6.0) whereas 2017 LG OLED TVs rely on the WebOS 3.5 system for their smart TV capabilities. The Sony XBR65A1E allows you to access compatible apps on Google Play. There is a built-in microphone in the remote and a future firmware update will enable Google Assistant on the Sony XBR65A1E. The LG motion-sensing Magic Remote also has a built-in microphone, and the webOS platform is very intuitive to use.





https://tvevaluate.com/review-sony-xbr65a1e-oled/

That is one of the better reviews I have read thanks for posting, really looking forward to your comparison .



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Discussion Starter #9
I'm going to try and do an initial calibration on my A1 tomorrow but here are some initial questions/thoughts;

1) You have to set XDR to low/medium/high to get the set in the target luminance range that you want so we need to calibrate with XDR set?

2) Also, it looks like we need to calibrate with the motions settings off?

3) Since this set seems to be behaving like the LG OLED, I think we should try and adjust the 2pt low at 5% if needed and see if it effects the brightness like this setting does on the LG. Also i'm wondering if setting the 0% black in Calman to something like 0.0005 or 0.0034 nits vs 0 is needed on the 2017s since near black isn't an issue.

4) Any thoughts on using expert1 or expert2 or custom to calibrate HDR?

5) I noticed that you can set the Gamma in Cimena Home and Pro in HDR mode. What's that since HDR uses the EOTF curve?
 
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I'm going to try and do an initial calibration on my A1 tomorrow but here are some initial questions/thoughts;

1) You have to set XDR to low/medium/high to get the set in the target luminance range that you want so we need to calibrate with XDR set?

2) Also, it looks like we need to calibrate with the motions settings off?

3) Since this set seems to be behaving like the LG OLED, I think we should try and adjust the 2pt low at 5% if needed and see if it effects the brightness like this setting does on the LG. Also i'm wondering if setting the 0% black in Calman to something like 0.0005 or 0.0034 nits vs 0 is needed on the 2017s since near black isn't an issue.

4) Any thoughts on using expert1 or expert2 or custom to calibrate HDR?

5) I noticed that you can set the Gamma in Cimena Home and Pro in HDR mode. What's that since HDR uses the EOTF curve?
This set is a lot like the two year + old LG OLED set I replaced. Except for the addition of HDR and a few other features, I see very little difference after the first day.
 

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3) Since this set seems to be behaving like the LG OLED, I think we should try and adjust the 2pt low at 5% if needed and see if it effects the brightness like this setting does on the LG. Also i'm wondering if setting the 0% black in Calman to something like 0.0005 or 0.0034 nits vs 0 is needed on the 2017s since near black isn't an issue.

5) I noticed that you can set the Gamma in Cimena Home and Pro in HDR mode. What's that since HDR uses the EOTF curve?
you probably already saw but flatpanelshd claimed that any use of 2pt low caused elevated black levels.

Regarding the gamma function in HDR, the z9 is the same way. Changing the setting seems to have an equivalent impact to a 0.1 change in gamma but like you say, 0 should be correct no?

The only use for gamma setting I could think of is to correct brightness of mid tones (to a degree) if you need to significantly adjust contrast to avoid clipping with hdr signal. That is assuming that the 10pt controls on a1 are broken like the z9 ( http://www.avsforum.com/forum/166-lcd-flat-panel-displays/2561241-sony-xbr-65z9d-xbr-75z9d-calibration-fine-tuning-thread-owners-only-3.html#post46566377 ). If the 10pt controls aren't introducing artifacts like in that link then the gamma setting is a curious indclusion
 

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This set is a lot like the two year + old LG OLED set I replaced. Except for the addition of HDR and a few other features, I see very little difference after the first day.
Very helpful statement in a specific Calibration thread.

Cheers
emes
 

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Very helpful statement in a specific Calibration thread.

Cheers
emes
I don't know if you are being sarcastic or not, but I found my experiences in calibrating the LG OLED helpful with the Sony A1E. I thought maybe understanding the close similarity to the LG sets might be useful to others. If not, my apologies for saying so.
 

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Did you make real measurements or is this your post an assumption?

No matter what, sorry for my unfriendly post.

Cheers and happy calibrating.

Emes
 

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So I tried the calibration settings from the Flatpanels review on my 55".

http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.p...&id=1492757435

Their calibration settings produce a much more natural image on the screen for SDR (HD) broadcast sources and for SDR (HD) streaming over the Apple TV 4.

Whereas on the "Standard" default setting the reds and greens are pronounced (the picture pops more) and there is a little bit of judder in motion, with the Flatpanels calibration settings motion becomes smooth as silk and the reds and greens are smoothed out.

The only change I made from their calibrated setting was to set Extended Dynamic Range to High as I have quite a lot of ambient light during the day and this pumps up the brightness. At night you can keep it to Medium as per their setting.

I would say the difference is pretty stark. At first, I thought the TV lost its pop with the calibrated settings but then you realize the picture is much closer to what was intended.

The naming conventions on the TV settings are slightly different with their Euro model set then with the NA set but it's minor.

I hope they provide more settings for 4k broadcast, HDR UHD streaming and gaming otherwise I'm thinking of getting the set professionally calibrated.

P.S. I thought I would crosspost this from the A1E owners thread.
 

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you probably already saw but flatpanelshd claimed that any use of 2pt low caused elevated black levels.

Regarding the gamma function in HDR, the z9 is the same way. Changing the setting seems to have an equivalent impact to a 0.1 change in gamma but like you say, 0 should be correct no?
I recall reading that the article said that "not touching" the RGB "bias" will insure the (inky blacks we have come to know from OLEDs).
 

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I recall reading that the article said that "not touching" the RGB "bias" will insure the (inky blacks we have come to know from OLEDs).
I think we're saying the same thing. Bias = 2pt low, and what I understood from the article was that its best left untouched because changing any of the bias/2pt controls results in elevated blacks.

In any case, I'm sure @jrref will see either way what the case is and report back to us :D
 

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I recall reading that the article said that "not touching" the RGB "bias" will insure the (inky blacks we have come to know from OLEDs).

For the record, I made minor adjustments to the bias levels and it did not harm the black levels at all. Or if so, it didn't in the sense that it spoiled true black because it was still very much present on what I viewed in a pitch black room.


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So I tried the calibration settings from the Flatpanels review on my 55".

http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.p...&id=1492757435

Their calibration settings produce a much more natural image on the screen for SDR (HD) broadcast sources and for SDR (HD) streaming over the Apple TV 4.

Whereas on the "Standard" default setting the reds and greens are pronounced (the picture pops more) and there is a little bit of judder in motion, with the Flatpanels calibration settings motion becomes smooth as silk and the reds and greens are smoothed out.

The only change I made from their calibrated setting was to set Extended Dynamic Range to High as I have quite a lot of ambient light during the day and this pumps up the brightness. At night you can keep it to Medium as per their setting.

I would say the difference is pretty stark. At first, I thought the TV lost its pop with the calibrated settings but then you realize the picture is much closer to what was intended.

The naming conventions on the TV settings are slightly different with their Euro model set then with the NA set but it's minor.

I hope they provide more settings for 4k broadcast, HDR UHD streaming and gaming otherwise I'm thinking of getting the set professionally calibrated.

P.S. I thought I would crosspost this from the A1E owners thread.
Thanks for the live usage report. Helps to know for those of us who aren't always watching in the dark. I don't care for the Soap Opera effect but am willing to turn enhanced motion settings to low if it only does the least amount of smoothing without overkill. Do you find that to be the case here?
 

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Thanks for the live usage report. Helps to know for those of us who aren't always watching in the dark. I don't care for the Soap Opera effect but am willing to turn enhanced motion settings to low if it only does the least amount of smoothing without overkill. Do you find that to be the case here?
Honestly, I can't stand the soap opera effect either. On my 7 year old Sony XBR I had to turn the processing off completely to avoid it. On this TV I followed the Flatpannels review calibrated settings under the Motion section and there is no Soap opera effect even with some motion processing on. There are two settings that you need to aware of. One is Motionflow and the other is Cinemotion. I keep Cinemotion between Low and Off. On high the soap opera effect will rear it's head. For the Motionflow setting I keep it set to Custom with the smoothness subsetting on 3. I think Sony's processing chip is really something else.
 
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