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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a sony xrb800 I aquired yesterday. The owner gave it to me it works but the acrylic layer on the front protecting is scratched or gouged out.


Can I remove the front bezel and remove this? It looks like plexiglass. I assume this is some kind of protection as the tube face should be glass and not plexi glass.

I think the tv got dragged out of a suv and the latch for the back door rubbed it.


I sure hope I can get it working with a correct picture instead of a damaged section.!!!!
 

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homerging has a good memory.
I posted the thread linked above almost 2 years ago.

Post #15 gives some details on how I removed the antiglare filter from my 34XBR800. It was rather a ***** to get off, but I definitely like the picture better without it. The screen is more reflective, but if you have reasonably good lighting control in the place where you're using it, that shouldn't be a major issue.


If you have any questions, please feel free to ask here or in the thread linked above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info I am vacation for another while after that I will remove the damaged coating and if I have any questions I will post. Thanks again.


I still cannot understand what makes this tv soooo heavy.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRTGAMER
Does it make the screen image much brighter?
It did on my TV. The difference wasn't dramatic, but it was noticeable as can be seen on the white level pattern below (left side of screen has filter removed). The filter also subtracts some blue from the image, which contributes to the impression of greater brightness after it's removed. (I made some slight adjustments to grayscale calibration afterwards to compensate for this.)


Some of the "yellowing" on the right/filtered side is possibly due to aging of the adhesive that bonds the filter to the screen.

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADU /forum/post/20874900


It did on my TV. The difference wasn't dramatic, but it was noticeable as can be seen on the white level pattern below (left side of screen has filter removed). The filter also subtracts some blue from the image, which contributes to the impression of greater brightness after it's removed. (I made some slight adjustments to grayscale calibration afterwards to compensate for this.)


Some of the "yellowing" on the right/filtered side is possibly due to aging of the adhesive that bonds the filter to the screen.

Thanks for the pic. That is a drastic difference, I can see where the blue would be brighter with that yellow filter removed. Can you post a side by side a pause DVD image? How about room lighting, do you notice an increased glare with the lights on or window shades open?
 

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There are more photos here that should give you an idea of the difference in glare/reflection.


The first image gives an extreme (ie, not likely to occur in most people's setups) example of the difference in reflections with and without the filter, with a brightly lit white panel held directly in front of the TV. The 2nd picture shows the difference in diffuse/indirect reflection (glare) from the screen.


The screen is definitely more reflective without the filter, because it's just plain glass. So yes, a little more attention needs to be given to the lighting arrangement and position of the TV, if you don't want to be looking at a mirror image of yourself whenever there's a dark scene.



The reflections don't really bother me though. The image looks clearer and sharper to my eyes without the filter, and shadow details still look inky black on the TV with proper room lighting.


All of those photos were taken a few years ago back when I removed the filter from my TV btw.


The white level pattern (shown above) was probably the best illustration of the difference in program content that I was able to capture, given my limited skills with digital cameras at the time. I watched a number of DVDs with the filter left on just half of the screen though and there was a noticeable difference to my eyes, especially on brighter scenes. If you are a stickler for accurate color on your TV, you'll most likely want to recalibrate the grayscale, and probably also the black and white level settings on the TV if the filter is removed.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADU /forum/post/20883161


There are more photos here that should give you an idea of the difference in glare/reflection.

Thanks, I was hoping to see a full screen image of just regular video such as a paused DVD color screen. The white images don't tell me much to determine if removing the shield is worth the trouble. But since the pics are from an old black and white, I can see removing a faded glare shield of that vintage makes sense. On the WEGA HD CRTs might make the pic worse?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I just removed mine. I had a hd-dvd playing while I removed mine. I see no difference in brightness. I only removed mine because of the deep gouge in mine. I am sure happy I rescued the tv it is every bit as good as any plasma I have seen ( I own one). I can't wait to try some games on it.
 

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I have enjoyed the xbr800 for 3 weeks now.I may have paid too much,175$ including matching Sony stand but love the picture quality.The sound is very nice also.I hope it will last a little while before needing the board and capacitor repairs.Sometimes I think it looks as good as a plasma I use to have.
 

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Free Sony KV-34XBR800. I have one that I attempted to repair and I guess I failed, had the 6/7 red blink code, now after attempted repair it has 3 blink. I give up on it. Anyone want? I'm in Flint MI, 48506.
 
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