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When you go to an AMC and see an image projected from a professional Sony 4K Cinema Projector, the contrast seems better than I've seen from their home units (at least the ones without a variable iris) and I know the cinema units don't have variable irises.

Do they look better in theaters simply because they're throwing so much light, because of the steps taken (in at least some theatres) to minimize light reflections, or is there a more technical reason?

Obviously there's a tiny price differential (Sony theater projectors are $150K) but I was wondering what the specifics were.

To me, the best looking home market image I've seen is still that thrown by a JVC, though the top of the line Sonys like the 600 can be, as long as the iris doesn't pump visibly.
 

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And that is with 3000:1 contrast ratio. On/off is not everything there is for a realistic picture so I am not that surprised by the observation. I imagine theater treatment vary from one place to another a bit but they are likely better that the HT setups you may have seen. I guess.
 

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And that is with 3000:1 contrast ratio.
I'm not sure what models kucharsk has seen, but the 510P on Sony's site here:

http://us.digitalcinema.sony.com/pr...tors/srx-r510p/specifications/#specifications

says more than 4000:1 in one spot and 8000:1 in another. A couple of other models said more than 2000:1. I'm not sure what they do in practice or what they do for ANSI CR.

They also get to run sources with a higher bit depth than we get at home, so that may help with some low level detail. They can also have more saturated colors than we generally get at home while calibrated to the right standard for the material.

I tend to see sequential CR weaknesses at the theater, but there can be some very nice images overall. I'm looking forward to seeing what the new IMAX laser projectors can provide for images since I think they will have very high sequential CR. Seattle will be get one (or 2 in one booth) around the end of the year and I think LA has a setup with this now.

--Darin
 

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I'm not sure what models kucharsk has seen, but the 510P on Sony's site here:

http://us.digitalcinema.sony.com/pr...tors/srx-r510p/specifications/#specifications

says more than 4000:1 in one spot and 8000:1 in another. A couple of other models said more than 2000:1. I'm not sure what they do in practice or what they do for ANSI CR.

They also get to run sources with a higher bit depth than we get at home, so that may help with some low level detail. They can also have more saturated colors than we generally get at home while calibrated to the right standard for the material.

I tend to see sequential CR weaknesses at the theater, but there can be some very nice images overall. I'm looking forward to seeing what the new IMAX laser projectors can provide for images since I think they will have very high sequential CR. Seattle will be get one (or 2 in one booth) around the end of the year and I think LA has a setup with this now.

--Darin
I will say this, one of the best images that I have seen projected, was from a projector that had high lumens, showing DCI content with higher bit depth in a dedicated home theater. Contrast on that projector was right around 7,000:1.
 

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I'm not sure what models kucharsk has seen, but the 510P on Sony's site here:

http://us.digitalcinema.sony.com/pr...tors/srx-r510p/specifications/#specifications

says more than 4000:1 in one spot and 8000:1 in another. A couple of other models said more than 2000:1. I'm not sure what they do in practice or what they do for ANSI CR.

They also get to run sources with a higher bit depth than we get at home, so that may help with some low level detail. They can also have more saturated colors than we generally get at home while calibrated to the right standard for the material.

I tend to see sequential CR weaknesses at the theater, but there can be some very nice images overall. I'm looking forward to seeing what the new IMAX laser projectors can provide for images since I think they will have very high sequential CR. Seattle will be get one (or 2 in one booth) around the end of the year and I think LA has a setup with this now.

--Darin

There is a dual set up in Hollywood, CA. Go to the AV Science Homepage and you will see scott W's review of it.
 

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When you go to an AMC and see an image projected from a professional Sony 4K Cinema Projector, the contrast seems better than I've seen from their home units (at least the ones without a variable iris) and I know the cinema units don't have variable irises.

Do they look better in theaters simply because they're throwing so much light, because of the steps taken (in at least some theatres) to minimize light reflections, or is there a more technical reason?

Obviously there's a tiny price differential (Sony theater projectors are $150K) but I was wondering what the specifics were.

To me, the best looking home market image I've seen is still that thrown by a JVC, though the top of the line Sonys like the 600 can be, as long as the iris doesn't pump visibly.

Sony has a great commercial theater projector at less than half that price and I know of one retired forum member who has one.
 

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I will say this, one of the best images that I have seen projected, was from a projector that had high lumens, showing DCI content with higher bit depth in a dedicated home theater. Contrast on that projector was right around 7,000:1.

That projector does throw a great picture. I wish I had one myself. but for that, I'm going to need a bigger screen. Heck, I'm going to need a bigger house ! :eek:
 

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So how good is it?(The VW1000es) Inside CI recently visited Sony's Professional Solutions group, part of its Technology Centre facility, in Atsugi Japan. Here we had a chance to compare the performance of the VPL-VW1000ES against a 4K digital cinema projector running exactly the same native 4K content, specifically the theatrical trailer for The Amazing Spider-Man.

Amazingly, there was no significant difference between the two, once you factored out screen size and brightness issues. Picture performance was (appropriately) amazing. The VPL-VW1000ES employs a high specification ARC-F (All-Range Crisp Focus) lens developed specifically for this model, which maintains focus and combats aberrations right to the edge of the lens. Existing high-end home theatre owners should require very little persuasion that an Ultra HD upgrade is worth the investment, even with a lack of 4K content.
http://www.insideci.co.uk/articles/interview-why-sony-leads-with-4k-ultra-hd.aspx
 

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That projector does throw a great picture. I wish I had one myself. but for that, I'm going to need a bigger screen. Heck, I'm going to need a bigger house ! :eek:
I have a family room with a 25' wide by 17' high wall, that I could make work, but my wife would kill me. :)
 

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I'm not sure what models kucharsk has seen, but the 510P on Sony's site here:

http://us.digitalcinema.sony.com/pr...tors/srx-r510p/specifications/#specifications

says more than 4000:1 in one spot and 8000:1 in another. A couple of other models said more than 2000:1. I'm not sure what they do in practice or what they do for ANSI CR.

They also get to run sources with a higher bit depth than we get at home, so that may help with some low level detail. They can also have more saturated colors than we generally get at home while calibrated to the right standard for the material.

I tend to see sequential CR weaknesses at the theater, but there can be some very nice images overall. I'm looking forward to seeing what the new IMAX laser projectors can provide for images since I think they will have very high sequential CR. Seattle will be get one (or 2 in one booth) around the end of the year and I think LA has a setup with this now.

--Darin



See the SRX-T615 here: http://www.sony.dk/pro/product/projectors-visualisation-simulation/srx-t615/specifications/
( 18,000 Center lumens , Contrast ratio 12,000:1 , and up to 4K 60P 4:4:4 12 bit )
and probely cheap too ;):D


dj
 

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Sony has released 3 generations of Cinema projectors, the R220, R320, and R515. The R515 has been around for a couple years now, and is used in auditoriums with a 40ft wide screen or smaller.

The R220 and R320 have a contrast ratio of around 2000:1, comparable to the DLP line of Cinema Projectors (Barco, Christie, NEC xenons). It's worth noting that Sony claims the SXRD chip used in these projectors is capable of 4000:1. Both the R220 and R320 use the same optical block and SXRD panel.

The R515 was released with a new SXRD optical engine and chip, and claims an average 8000:1 contrast ratio. You can definitely tell a difference between a 515 and any other xenon/mercury DCinema projector's contrast ratio. There are other variations of the 500/600 family of projectors, but the R515P is the one widely installed in cinemas.

The T615 is non-DCI, and I would guess the higher lumens and contrast has to do with not needing to produce the DCI gamut with mercury bulbs. A lot of color filtering is required for mercury bulbs to reproduce the same color that xenons do.
 

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Sony has a great commercial theater projector at less than half that price and I know of one retired forum member who has one.
The demo units of the SRX-R110 (together with the 105, was the first generation Drumdude) were sold at $50K, by Sony USA. Since then there have been smaller units introduced the 515 (now re-launched at Cinemacon as a dual projector 3D) and the 510, for instance, these even use UHP lamps, don't they.

There was Jeremy's $6 million X-box set-up;-). I haven't seen him here in years.

The cheapest 4K DLP projectors are going for (somewhat over) half that amount.
 

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That's most likely an R320, as the lens is offset to the left. On an R515 the lens is centered on the projector.

One difference is that Sony allows technicians to periodically adjust the gamma curve on their DCinema projectors, to maintain the correct gamma over the lifespan of the block, and compensate for LCOS aging issues.
 

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The T615 is non-DCI, and I would guess the higher lumens and contrast has to do with not needing to produce the DCI gamut with mercury bulbs. A lot of color filtering is required for mercury bulbs to reproduce the same color that xenons do.
I was just looking at the T615's user manual. You can order an optional filter if you want it to produce a P3-DCI gamut.
 
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