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Digital streaming will be the best you get. Many titles on DVD but not on bd are available in HD from streaming. And the HD stream will typically be better than what is on the dvd.
Yes, but you can't really own a stream or a DRM protected download. For a lot of people that is important. If you want to own a collection a lot of movies will not make it to BD or UBD and you'll have to live with the older format. Luckily upscaling is pretty good now-a-days on the right player, and I'm not super picky.
 

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Only thing I do diff is cut DRC off too.
 
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I had a problem earlier while watching Jurassic park 3d. Not sure if it's my 5500 bluray player or the epson 6030ub. Please help I was watching the movie in 3d and the picture started getting some red blobs on the screen. Also the outline of the screen turned red. Turned off 3d movie and went back to the Sony bluray menu and then went back into the movie and it was fine. What do you guys think
 

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They were all just posted in like the last 5 posts.
 
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It's not just you. DVD looks like crap on anything when compared to a Blu-ray Disc.
I don't know. Since I exchanged the 6500 for the 3500 last week, I've watched many blu rays and also dvds, and I can't tell that huge of a difference in PQ. As long as the noise issue doesn't come back, I think I'll be happy with this player. :)
 

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How can you guys watch DVDs still? I got rid of ALL my DVDs through Best Buy trade ins and have over 350 Blurays. Netflix streaming is better than DVDs. I will never touch a DVD again.
I have over 500 dvds. What? I should spend money to replace them all? I think not. They look fine to me. :p

Now I will start collecting blu rays... (and then once again be behind the times when 4k players/discs come out, and I'm still buying/watching blu rays.)
 

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I have over 500 dvds. What? I should spend money to replace them all? I think not. They look fine to me. :p

Now I will start collecting blu rays... (and then once again be behind the times when 4k players/discs come out, and I'm still buying/watching blu rays.)
Since my TV is small (40") there isn't a big difference between DVD and BD. The biggest difference has always been the audio. In a good quality surround system something extra is really added with DTS-MA and others. Not that DVD is bad, but the dynamic range of a Blu-ray is much better. But we are getting into the "theater" experience, which is not really a Sony problem.
 

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Is there a difference in the video processing chip between the 5500 and 6500?

I just did a comparison with Chappie and my DSLR (pics eventually). Regarding picture quality, there is ZERO difference between the 5500 and a PS3.
 

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I don't know. Since I exchanged the 6500 for the 3500 last week, I've watched many blu rays and also dvds, and I can't tell that huge of a difference in PQ. As long as the noise issue doesn't come back, I think I'll be happy with this player. :)
SOmething is definitely wrong then if you can't tell a difference. DVDs, 480p has no detail in the image. The resolution just isn't there for any detail. There should be a night and day difference between a BD and a DVD. That has always been the case.

Whether I'm looking on a 27" set or an 82" set, the difference between a BD and a DVD has always been huge.
 

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I have a problem that I can not seem to figure out. I purchased the BDP-S6500 over the weekend. I cannot get Dolby Atmos or really bitstreaming in general to work with this player. I know it is NOT my receiver. I can play the exact title through my PS3 and get the Dolby Atmos stream to play through my Onkyo TX-NR3030. With the Sony BDP-S6500 in the setup audio section, it lists only PCM and I think it's Default (I'm at work); I do not have bitstream or anything like that as an option. During the movie playback (Unbroken and Transformers Revenge of the Fallen), my receiver does not list the DTS True HD or Dolby HD as bitstream. My receiver picks Dolby Surround as the best audio (which is simulated Atmos). Any idea what is going on with my player? If I can't resolve the issue, it's going back. However if I can get this working, the player seems great - it looks great with upscaled 4K on my JVC 4910 projector.

Thanks for any help.
I watched teh entire 3D BD of Jupiter Acending with it's DOlby True HD 7.1 track which is supposed to be an Atmos mix. I don't have an Atmos player but I had no problems bitstreaming the Dolby True HD 7.1 to my Denon 4520. And the 3D worked fine too.
Too bad the movie content was an incoherent mess. But the audio and video quality was good.
 

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SOmething is definitely wrong then if you can't tell a difference. DVDs, 480p has no detail in the image. The resolution just isn't there for any detail. There should be a night and day difference between a BD and a DVD. That has always been the case.

Whether I'm looking on a 27" set or an 82" set, the difference between a BD and a DVD has always been huge.
I think he's talking about the S3500 vs S6500.
 

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480p has no detail in the image. The resolution just isn't there for any detail.
There is plenty of detail stored in those 720x480i silver discs. When DVDs were introduced, all the talk was how sharp, clear, and detailed the image was--a breakthrough in home entertainment.

I attended Sony's east coast introduction of the DVD format, which took place in Manhattan. If I remember correctly it was in 1995. The picture quality astounded everyone attending the demo. Sony's representatives repeatedly pointed out the high levels of detail that the new format provided. The DVD promised to combine the video quality of a LaserDisc with the convenience of a small disc and a low cost. At the time I was paying from $25 to $50 per movie on LD.

For those like myself who had large-screen, high-performance, rear-projection televisions, we impatiently waited about two years for the format's commercial release. I purchased my first DVD player in February 1997, a few weeks before DVDs even became available. Playing early DVDs on my Pioneer 50" RPTV was a big thrill. Friends and relatives came to visit and marveled at all the detail on the screen.

Of course Blu-ray is superior, but a well-mastered anamorphic DVD can provide an excellent picture, especially when it is upscaled properly.
 

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We have a large collection of DVDs of films from the 1930s and '40s, and watch TCM frequently as well.
Alex, sorry for the delayed thanks for your help and follow-up question. Both theoretically, and in your own actual experience, what should be, or is, the ranking in picture and audio quality between Blu-ray, DVD, and cable broadcast. I'm of course assuming Blu-ray is always better than DVD (!), but where would TCM fall, for instance? If you had the choice of watching a movie broadcast on TCM or Blu-ray, which would you pick, or would it depend (B&W or color movie, genre of movie, model of Blu-ray player, etc.)? And then what about TCM or DVD?
 

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There is plenty of detail stored in those 720x480i silver discs. When DVDs were introduced, all the talk was how sharp, clear, and detailed the image was--a breakthrough in home entertainment.

I attended Sony's east coast introduction of the DVD format, which took place in Manhattan. If I remember correctly it was in 1995. The picture quality astounded everyone attending the demo. Sony's representatives repeatedly pointed out the high levels of detail that the new format provided. The DVD promised to combine the video quality of a LaserDisc with the convenience of a small disc and a low cost. At the time I was paying from $25 to $50 per movie on LD.

For those like myself who had large-screen, high-performance, rear-projection televisions, we impatiently waited about two years for the format's commercial release. I purchased my first DVD player in February 1997, a few weeks before DVDs even became available. Playing early DVDs on my Pioneer 50" RPTV was a big thrill. Friends and relatives came to visit and marveled at all the detail on the screen.

Of course Blu-ray is superior, but a well-mastered anamorphic DVD can provide an excellent picture, especially when it is upscaled properly.
Of course a 720x480 image has more detail than what we were used to at the time. But once you get used to HD it doesn't cut it. You look in the background of an SD video and the detail just isn't there. I was all over DVDs when they were first released in the 90's. But I got my first HD set in 2001 and was also recording and time shifting most of my HD watching in 2001 too. I recorded a bunch of HD movies from ABC back then so I wouldn't have to look at the DVDs. So by 2005 I had already stopped watching DVDs in anticipation of the Disc HD formats being released in 2006.

It is extremely rare for me to watch a DVD now. Most recently I rented some of the Six Million Dollar Man and Bionic Woman series and watched those DVDs. But that is a rare thing for me. I dumped my hundreds of DVDs many years ago. I donated them and just took a several thousand dollar write off instead of trying to sell them. At least that was better than when I got rid of my hundreds of VHS tapes in the year 2000. I just threw those in the trash.
 

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Alex, sorry for the delayed thanks for your help and follow-up question. Both theoretically, and in your own actual experience, what should be, or is, the ranking in picture and audio quality between Blu-ray, DVD, and cable broadcast. I'm of course assuming Blu-ray is always better than DVD (!), but where would TCM fall, for instance? If you had the choice of watching a movie broadcast on TCM or Blu-ray, which would you pick, or would it depend (B&W or color movie, genre of movie, model of Blu-ray player, etc.)? And then what about TCM or DVD?
You are welcome.

As for your query, I cannot give a ranking because it depends on the video and audio quality of the source being utilized.

Blu-ray has the potential to be the best available, and it usually does provide the highest quality. (I am not including the upcoming Ultra High-Definition format.) But some BDs are disasters. For example, the BD releases of A Bridge Too Far and 2010: Odyssey Two immediately come to mind. Yet I have seen both movies in superb HD on television. There are other BDs as well that are disappointing to a lesser degree.

The latest audio formats, which are typically provided on Blu-rays of recent movies, especially action films, are the best ever offered.

I cannot comment on cable TV because we gave up on Cablevision's terrible video quality in New Jersey back in 2002. We have enjoyed DirecTV since that time.

As for TCM, they often broadcast superb HD prints of films that are available for purchase on DVD only (and not available at all on Blu-ray). I probably watch TCM more than any other channel (with the exception of news and Major League Baseball games--I cannot live without DirecTV's MLB package that provides live HD coverage of practically every game).

To sum up, as stated earlier, what is best always depends on the quality of the original source. The quality of components utilized at the receiving end--our homes--is important, too, for the best possible video and audio reproduction.
 

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Of course a 720x480 image has more detail than what we were used to at the time. But once you get used to HD it doesn't cut it. You look in the background of an SD video and the detail just isn't there. I was all over DVDs when they were first released in the 90's. But I got my first HD set in 2001 and was also recording and time shifting most of my HD watching in 2001 too. I recorded a bunch of HD movies from ABC back then so I wouldn't have to look at the DVDs. So by 2005 I had already stopped watching DVDs in anticipation of the Disc HD formats being released in 2006.

It is extremely rare for me to watch a DVD now. Most recently I rented some of the Six Million Dollar Man and Bionic Woman series and watched those DVDs. But that is a rare thing for me. I dumped my hundreds of DVDs many years ago. I donated them and just took a several thousand dollar write off instead of trying to sell them. At least that was better than when I got rid of my hundreds of VHS tapes in the year 2000. I just threw those in the trash.
Even though we have a large collection of Blu-ray discs, we also enjoy watching our DVDs. Many of the films we have on DVD are unobtanium on BD or via streaming. I will not toss out those DVDs because (1) they look fine and (2) I am not willing to never see those movies ever again.
\
We will just have to accept that we have different viewpoints on DVDs.
 
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Sony Playstation 3 vs Sony BDP-S5500

Here are my comparison pics (and my first attempt at a gif) between the Sony Playstation 3 and the Sony BDP-S5500. Except for a slight horizontal shift, there is ZERO picture quality difference between these two players.

Setup:
136" Carada Criterion 2.35:1 screen (roughly width of 144" 16:9/1.78:1 screen)
13' Viewing Distance
JVC RS46
Canon 70D, Identical exposures for comparison photos, tripod & Remote shooter.

I just wish the PS3 did Dolby TrueHD during 3D playback. The Blu-ray interface is so much nicer. The PS3 responds much faster, smoother FF & RW, 1.5x play...arg. Its almost enough to push me into a PS4...just for 3D+TrueHD (and games...eventually).
 

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Netflix only streams at 720p max when I check via the display button on the S5500, is there some setting that I am neglecting for it to stream at 1080p?
 
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