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GOOD THREAD BTW



ok separate question

I did not want to clutter the dryer trick POST


my tv a 32hs420 's chips went bad in 09

replaced with 3001D chips

they died about 2 years later

I used sockets

so I fliped the chip's positions

tv worked BUT DIED a few weeks later


hair dryer trick got it up and stays on now


but will the new chips die quickly AGAIN ?


HOW MANY HAVE REPEATEDLY RECHIP THEIR WEGA'S


AND THE STANDARD CHIP QUESTIONS


CAN I GET A NON -CHINA MADE CHIP OR AT LEAST A BETTER ONE ANYWHERE ?


ANY LINKS TO SMALL CHIP LOT SELLERS WITH BETTER CHIPS ?


WHAT ELSE OTHER THEN BAD CAP'S [BULGED] TO CHECK FOR
 

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The AX-1 chassis KV-HR36, KV-HR32, and the KV-HX32, and probably the KV-DA32 also had the MCZ3001D chip.


All MCZ3001DB chips are the same.


They die alot so buy some spares.


Not every time the TV stops working will mean the chip has failed. Temperature cycling can mean a chip pops its insertion-force socket so try reseating the chip before giving up on it.


Can anybody comment on the best type of socket to resist temperature cycling? Machine pinned sockets are supposed to provide better contact. I guess a ZIF socket would be best but tin plated ZIF sockets are hard to find.


There are a couple of electrolyte capacitors and fusible resistors on the d-board that can also fail and provide similar symptoms. I haven't seen any reports of them failing, though.
 

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My supplier of MCZ3001DB supplies two types of MCZ3001DB. One is a Shindengen MCZ, the other is an original Sony Japan made IC. Nota, you can buy the Japan made chips if u want, but i can't guarantee if they will be that much better than the chinese ones, although they probably are.

EDIT : Seems the Shindengen are the same as the Sony OEM ones sold there, (thats why i never buy the Sony one's lol 10$ more..
)

Here's a link
http://www.richtechparts.com/search....search=mcz3001

http://www.richtechparts.com/i-3803-..._ORIGINAL.html
 

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I take it back... it looks like there could be Chinese MCZ3001DB chips about now so I would stick to reputable retailers who source from Shindengen.


I don't think Sony makes MCZ3001DBs. Companies have their own supply chains for third party parts to make margins from repairs. Shindengen is also a Japanese company.

amazon.com/Sony-IC-MCZ3001DB/dp/B001DGL2W0/
amazon.com/SHINDENGEN-MCZ3001DB-Replaces-MCZ3001DA-670581001/dp/B005QOOACY/


The Sony part also has Shindengen stamped on it. \\


You may find this link interesting
hometheatershack.com/forums/sony/15857-no-power-6-7-blink-led-pattern.html

I guess that means it's a good idea to keep your fingers off the metal pins. He says a poor quality socket can actually lead to the TV being damaged. The DeOxit is a good tip.


A method of soldering machined pin sockets:
pin-logic.com/how_to_install_a_machine_pin_soc.htm
 

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any expert ideas on what the hair dryer trick is doing

what part fail if cold but is ok when hot ?

is it the chip it's self or some other bit ?
 

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I would find it very unlikely that the IC itself is working correctly once heated...

My bet is that the reason the hair dryer trick works is that the cause is more bad solders on the IC (or socket if one was used).

It could also be capacitors.. but that would work for a while and as soon as the TV is cold it wouldnt start up anymore.
 

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CRTGAMER:


'Bout a month ago my Sony Trinitron kv-36hs500 from 2002 (gifted 2 years ago by a wealthy client upgrading to an HDMI LCD, and which was often left on in a tight fitting cabinet) failed to instantly activate one day, and only after numerous tries. Got it back on two more times, and then 7 blinks of death had me pondering letting it gather dust rather than paying another $100 bucks to haul it downstairs to the car, not to mention recycling fees, and getting it out of the car again...


So I took the model number and followed where google may lead all the way to your very helpful page. Got the chips from TSM verbatim your links, and ordered the sockets there to boot, which came to Colorado within two days in regular mail.


Then with limited finances, I sought to borrow solder supplies without success, until today when extra funds coincided with the radio shack beginner kit on sale, along with desolder braid, tip cleaner, ultra-fine solder, a set of offset screwdrivers, and a lit magnifying glass came to another $80, so about $100 invested in this wacky venture to fix the Wega.


Had originally pulled off the back to blow out the dust (oh the slim hope), then came across this thread and verified the position of things and what it'd take. As I haven't come close to this kind of work since 8th grade shop in '84, it was with some trepidation that I resolved to try, and ordered the parts.


Looked at a video of desoldering with braid, and have a pretty decent head for responding to the flow of materials, and so, without practice, but carefully heeding your excellent warnings, I pulled off the back, detached and propped the D-board, and very cautiously, I finally took the plunge and desoldered the first, most isolated pin.


Couple times my technique was ill-considered, and the tip skittered across a trace overlay, and I did scream (seemingly no damage, thankfully), but soon found good neutral positioning with easy control, and the wick just drew out the solder, even despite having forgotten to clip the protruding pins on the first chip. The new kit came with a pronged pickup tool, and the old chip easily pulled free first time.


Found it helped to stop and clean the tip about every 3-4 pins, and after snipping them off, the next one came free just as easily. Popped in the sockets, using the bent pin to hold position, but used a finger also to hold in place while soldering the upper right and lower left, just to guarantee a tight fit. Soldering was easier, and with the fine stuff, it didn't collect on the tip, and amazingly looked almost identical to the old solder points when finished.


It couldn't be this easy? Another fellow on the thread regarding the anamorphic CRT Trinitron indicated that this is work for reasonably proficient people, so I was sure I'd missed something. Popped in the pre-fitted chips with some fumbles and curses, but with care to position them the same as the old, thanks to your thoughtful write-up.


Got the board screwed down and found I'd failed to fit it under a plastic lip next to the black clips on the upper right part of the board, though the clips had still popped in place despite it, which had me worried some extra stress might've affected them, especially when one popped up a bit too high when I undid it with some impatience (more cursing given how fragile they seemed and the need to not lift higher than absolutely necessary).


Fastened it all back down, connected back the wires, slid the tray back, put the back back on. Held my breath. Wondered if I'd soon be laughing hysterically or maddening hysterically?


For now, my laughter is merely hysterical!! It turned right on! The color was a little off on the left side (it has had issues in the past), so I did the worst and turned it off and right back on. No problem, the color righted itself, and the sound of the degausser is much quieter than before.


Very, very cool beans. Thank you so much for all your excellent and comprehensive directions, so straightforward a guy with just enough ability to pop the memory upgrade into a desktop was able to execute a repair on one of the more advanced CRT's ever made. The photos, the tool/parts list, the cautions, etc: all evidence of a stellar gift for instruction! Huzza!


Final note: having bookmarked this link a month ago, I didn't check newer posts before beginning, and now saw lcaillo's thread on the HomeTheaterShack link in which he advises against using sockets, as they can vary in quality, to properly clean pins before seating them, and to beware of cheaper chips.


I trust the chips, am reasonably confident about the sockets, but didn't think to clean them, though they mostly sat in their packaging until use. Mostly though, I didn't see his advise to use more solder to penetrate more deeply along the pins, though it hasn't made an immediate difference.


More importantly, if this does happen again, I feel reasonably confident that I'd be able to troubleshoot, thanks again, to CRTGAMER.


Final question, I think the picture may have drifted about a half inch to the left of center, and recall reading about an adjustment for that. Can anyone tell me what that was?


And one more time: THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU. At the very least, for not being forced to move the monstrosity from its perch, and for helping me to feel pretty dang empowered at the moment!
 

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Quote:
Final question, I think the picture may have drifted about a half inch to the left of center, and recall reading about an adjustment for that.

That's probably down to a shift in voltage or impact on the set during the repair. You can adjust the geometry and overscan settings in the service menu. But be careful as too many people have reset everything to defaults which can effectively brick the TV.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=531494

Do disable the red push while you're at it.
 

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Always write down every setting in the service menu, or take a screenshot photograph of every setting with a camera, before making ANY changes. This will be your ONLY lifeline if you screw anything up, nobody here can help out with default settings as nobody's default settings will be exactly the same as yours.
 

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Ok, Apparently, when I soldered in the sockets I got one in backwards but the chip itself was in properly, think that would have caused my issue I was having? btw the soldering job was beautiful, I cleaned the board of old solder then used flux and alcohol to get the old nasty stuff off worked like a charm there...just wish the tv started up..lol This is what happens when you repair electronics blind (glasses busted at the time)
I think I will try again this time without the sockets and with an even smaller tip on the Iron.


:Edit: instead of De-soldering braid I used a pen with a metal tip, duct tape a medicine bottle, and a Shop-Vac to Mc Gyver together a solder sucker, worked like a charm without costing me 75-200 bucks.



:Edit#2:


Ok Its all back together, Now I do not get any blinks...But the screen doesn't seem to turn on, I pushed the button, it makes some relay sounds....seems like it is on...blank screen as if it is off, no menu or anything. I have the remote but I did not touch it at all I was saving that till the sucker works.
 

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Bump, I'm thinking of buying these parts, the IC's I got were from eBay from a China seller...Possibly faulty?


Two of each..
http://www.tristatemodule.com/p-7979...dengen-ic.aspx
http://www.tristatemodule.com/p-1025...-resistor.aspx

And are these capacitors the two large ones?
http://www.tristatemodule.com/p-1520...mm-x-45mm.aspx


Like I said in my last post I get a soft "bwomp" sound and relay clicking but a blank black screen, no blinking, before I had 7 blinks.

Does any of this sound familiar?


I'm hoping for a somewhat quick reply, as I'd really like to get this awesome TV working again.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
REPAIR GUIDE IS IN THE OP ON PAGE ONE


@ interceptor1985 - Yes that is the same place I bought the chips, as posted in the Repair Guide. There is probably no need to replace the other parts, but install them if you like. Be sure to get Sockets just in case of a repeat repair years from now.


Good Luck and please post of the outcome.
 

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I just got the replacement chips in the mail, I'm also going to replace those two Fusible Resistor's by the caps, just in case that is part of the problem. I don't have good sockets but my soldering skills are very good I think so I don't mind soldering them in, I try to keep the chips as cool as possible when soldering by doing one pin at a time and giving it time to cool in between each pin.

I'll need some good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #34

Quote:
Originally Posted by interceptor1985 /forum/post/21452687


I just got the replacement chips in the mail, I'm also going to replace those two Fusible Resistor's by the caps, just in case that is part of the problem. I don't have good sockets but my soldering skills are very good I think so I don't mind soldering them in, I try to keep the chips as cool as possible when soldering by doing one pin at a time and giving it time to cool in between each pin.

I'll need some good luck!

Radio Shack has inexpensive sockets. if the chips happen to fail again years from now you'll make the job a lot easier in the future. This also saves the risk of damage to the PCB from another reheat desolder and solder.


Good luck which ever way you decide to go. Can you post a pic or two of the various components you replace?
 

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Thank you CRT for taking the time to put together this incredible tutorial. My KV34HS510, purchased in March 2004, started doing the "won't turn on, 6 blink" thing about 10 days ago. While waiting for the replacement chips, I did the hair dryer trick a few times, since we accidentally turned off the TV. Never having soldered before in my life, I was a bit skeptical about this actually working. But here I sit, watching college BB on the aforementioned KV34.
Thanks for helping this novice get the job done. Took me about 3 1/2 hrs and I spent about $35 on parts and tools. De-soldering braid worked great. The original chips were MCZ3001D btw.


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #36

Quote:
Originally Posted by mck024 /forum/post/21527916


Thank you CRT for taking the time to put together this incredible tutorial. My KV34HS510, purchased in March 2004, started doing the "won't turn on, 6 blink" thing about 10 days ago. While waiting for the replacement chips, I did the hair dryer trick a few times, since we accidentally turned off the TV. Never having soldered before in my life, I was a bit skeptical about this actually working. But here I sit, watching college BB on the aforementioned KV34.
Thanks for helping this novice get the job done. Took me about 3 1/2 hrs and I spent about $35 on parts and tools. De-soldering braid worked great. The original chips were MCZ3001D btw.


Mike

My pleasure, I learned from all the experts here on the Forums.

EDIT

Thankyou David for making this Guide a Sticky.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRTGAMER /forum/post/21779106


My pleasure, I learned from all the experts here on the Forums.

This Guide disappeared from the Forums until I bumped it, can a Mod sticky this? See the OP for the Guide, I put a lot of work in this. My hope it is always available and easy to find for reference to any WEGA owner.

I agree. This thread should be stickied.


TLK
 

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Thank you so much for this guide. My trinitron stopped working a few years back and rather than throw it away I stored it. My back aches just thinking about picking it up again but it'll be worth it!
 

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Hey Guys, my TV has the problem described in this thread.

I finally decided to open the TV up to clean it and hope it'd work. When I opened this, I found a really strange thing. There was a liquid(hardened now) on top of the tube. Anyone know what it possibly could be? The TV has never been opened to my knowledge. It may have by apreviousnu.

youtube.co. m/watch?v=eoH4dWsi3Rw&feature=youtube_gdata_player
 
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