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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've picked up an elderly 1020QM PJ and have it hanging from the ceiling firing at the wall opposite and am generally very happy with the picture it produces (particularily as it cost less than half of the price of my TV) but I have one setup problem that I can't solve by mere knob & screw twiddling.


The image is going off the sides and wrapping around at the edges. It is best displayed on the Hatch test where I can get the left or right edge on view but can't reduce the width to get both at the same time.


I have a manual but it only details how to converge and focus the whole test pattern so it's not hugely useful on this one. The throw is a little more than the optimum suggested and although I have a larger image, I had the same situation before I mounted it and was trying all sizes and places to get it into a liveable useable position.


Any advice is welcome but please go simple on the technical terms - until a couple of weeks ago I thought a raster was a bloke from Jamaica.


binbag
 

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If the main width pot is set all the way down and it still displays this problem you will have to get inside there and re adjust the width coils to an exceptable level.


This may even be a sign that somthing has failed if all the controls are set to the lowest setting and the image is too big. But dont beleive that just yet. Some where down in there is the RED GREEN BLUE width coils and you must adjust them with the plastic TWIDDLE tools for colr TV's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks.


Found 'em, twiddled 'em - did'nt get the result I was after but did knock another few inches off the width of the image which is another thing that I was after anyway.


Any other ideas?


binbag.
 

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There should be another pot somewhere that controls horizontal phase. The convergance pots and the pots on the back just move the raster around the face of the tube. This control moves the image around within the raster and will do exactly what you are describing if set to far one way or the other. Unfortunately I can't tell you where to find this pot on your model. On my 1000Q it is located on a different board all together than the convergance pots, and is a different shape and color. I would just suggest looking around, starting at the convergance section and working your way out. It should be labeled something like Horiz. Phase although I can't remember exactly what it is on mine. Maybe someone with a 1020 will be able to point you to it.


Rob
 

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There are a number of mysterious pots in the deep guts of the 1020 - one is labelled "KILL" on the board....can't remember which board tho - it was one of the vertical boards.


I bought the adjustment manual and the service manual online for $10 - but there wasn't a description of these obscure pots unfortunately. There are a number of them that are a different color and size, and I'd love to know what they do.


I'm trying to squeeze everything out of this great projector that I can... but i'm running out of options with a basic component video feed.


I'll scan the manual to see if I can find the Horizontal Phase pot. If I do, I'll post back here.


Any 1020 hints / tips / tricks from other 1020 owners would be greatly appreciated!
 

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On my 1000Q, also a video only Sony (though slightly newer) I found there were a couple of things that signifigantly improved the picture. First was replacing the plastic TAC-3 lenses with glass HD-6 ones. This allowed me to greatly improve sharpness of focus, and only cost about $25. Next was going to a squashed 16:9 aspect ratio. This greatly reduces the appearance of scan lines on a reasonable sized screen. I'm always taken by suprise when I go back to 4:3 for non-animorphic dvds how much more previlent the scan lines are.


I will eventually upgrade to a data grade unit like a BD 600, Ampro 2000D, or Sony 1031 when a good deal comes along, but in the mean time I consider it a challenge to squeeze a decent picture out of this old machine.


Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've used the pot marked H. Hold to do as miscrms describes which minimises the effect of the overspill but what I'm after is reducing the width of the image projected so it is all visible. Its not a huge problem - I reckon there is less than 6 inches going off on an 80 inch wide image.
 

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To fix the wdith problem, I think Vic hit the nail on the head. You can shrink the image width up to a certain point using the convergance pots, but the prefered way to make the adjustment is using the width coils. On the 1020 the coils are located in the upper left (looking at the PJ from the back) on the E board. There are three of them, one for each color, and they kind of look like three little spools of thread sitting on the board. They are adjusted by a hex screw in the center, that can be turned with an adjustment tool such as that in Radio Shack kit #64-2230. Mine were not very sensitive, and required several complete turns to correctly set the width.


Here is the method I used (pieced together from info here on the board) to correctly set my height and width for 16:9 projection. Again I highly recommend going 16:9 with these video only units to reduce scan lines, you just have to set your DVD player to widescreen TV, and be playing anamorphic or enhanced widesceen DVDs. This may not work verbatim for your setup, but its a starting place.


1. Using masking tape, measure out and mask off the 16:9 screen size you are shooting for on the wall using the calculations in the manual.

2. Turn off Red and Blue tubes.

3. project the crosshatch test pattern (or preferably play one from the DVD player)

4. center all convergance pots

5. set the green v-size pot about half way between center and its smallest setting, and master h-size pot about half way between center and its biggest setting making sure that the image on the face of the green tube does not extend beyond the edges of the of the tube face.

6. move the projector back and forth (adjusting green center focus as you go) until the height of the projected cross hatch just overlaps the top and bottom of the masked screen area.

7. adjust the green width coil to set the width to where it just overlaps the sides of the screen area, again being very careful that the image on the tube face does not extend off the edges of the tube face.

8. turn on red, focus the center.

9. use the red v-size pot to roughly match the height of the red crosshatch to the green.

10. use the red width coil to roughly match the red width to the green.

11. repeat 8, 9 and 10 for the blue tube.

12. go back and fine tune the center and edge focus on each tube and then go ahead and do a full convergance.


The only thing this method doesn't do is guarantee that you are maximizing your horizontal raster usage. Ideally you would set the width by looking at the tube face and pushing the raster out to 1/4" or so from the tube edges, then adjust the PJ distance to screen so that the width fits the screen. The problem is that you then may not have enough v-size adjustment to be able to get to both 16:9 and 4:3 which then leads to considerably more involved adjustments. If it were to turn out that you did have enough adjustment on v-size, then chances are the method above would have ended up using most of the horizontal phosphor anyways.


Now when you want to view 4:3 material such as non-animorphic DVDs or regular TV, you have 2 choices. you can pop the top and just shrink the master h-size until you are back to 4:3, or you can increase the G, R and B v-size to get you to 4:3. If you increase the v-size, again be very careful that the image does not extend outside the face of the tube.


Going to 4:3 by shrinking the main h-size will result in a smaller, nicer image particularly for lower resolution sources such as regular tv and vhs. However there is a disadvantage, particularly if you watch a lot of material in this mode, that you are using a very small amount of phosphor in the center of the tube. This will eventually cause a small 4:3 wear pattern that will be visable when you go out to 16:9. For this reason, I take the option of growing the v-sizes for watching 4:3 material. It is definately a worse image, but much of that can be made up for by sitting farther back from the screen. Another nice benefit is that most static images in 4:3 material such as controls in video games, or TV station id logos will tend to be above or below the main 16:9 area, so if they do cause burn in, it will not be visable in your movies.


Good Luck,


Rob
 
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