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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at SONY XBR9 LCD's (32" and 37"), the KDL-32XBR9 in particular, which is starting to sell at very inviting prices and has a good reliability record.


RGB controls, Hue (Tint) and Color have no effect on this level of Red over-saturation, which is well over 45%. For some time I've been all over the 'net looking for a way to tame it in the service menu. No, I do NOT want to go in there and mess around with other settings, and I'm not about to touch anything without precise information about what I'm doing. The user controls will suffice for just about everything, but not for that horrible Red. My eyes are telling me that if Red could be tamed, the color and the heavy gamma problem at low IRE's could be helped considerably.


For calibration I have a couple of EyeOne Display2's and Calman and HCFR software. I've seen some info posted elsewhere on some of the 32XBR9 menus, but no mention of the color controls in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hm, I didn't think anyone here would have a handle on that.


So I spent $38 on SONY service manuals for this tv, then bought the TV home. Not a bad picture, really, I give SONY some credit for a better than average SD and HD picture and good motion control.


Average red push in this monster is 35%. That's pretty severe, people. Judy Garland looks like a Las Vegas prostitute on this thing, and Morgan Freeman is purple. Limited RGB controls (The Gain controls let you lower RGB colors, but you can't raise them!! What kinda "Gain" control is that, for heavens sake?) Obviously the Hue and Color can't fix this kind of problem.


Kept it three days, couldn't get a decent calibration out of it, service menu no help. Brought it back to BestBuy on Day 4 and got a refund.


A tv that can't be calibrated isn't "HDTV", it's HRLQ (higher-resolution/lower-quality).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanlyn /forum/post/18464036


Hm, I didn't think anyone here would have a handle on that.


So I spent $38 on SONY service manuals for this tv, then bought the TV home. Not a bad picture, really, I give SONY some credit for a better than average SD and HD picture and good motion control.


Average red push in this monster is 35%. That's pretty severe, people. Judy Garland looks like a Las Vegas prostitute on this thing, and Morgan Freeman is purple. Limited RGB controls (The Gain controls let you lower RGB colors, but you can't raise them!! What kinda "Gain" control is that, for heavens sake?) Obviously the Hue and Color can't fix this kind of problem.


Kept it three days, couldn't get a decent calibration out of it, service menu no help. Brought it back to BestBuy on Day 4 and got a refund.


A tv that can't be calibrated isn't "HDTV", it's HRLQ (higher-resolution/lower-quality).

My 32 inch XBR6 doesn't have this problem! I haven't looked at any of the new Sonys. I am surprised that it's that far off. My XBR6 only has grey scale adjustments and I use the warmest color temp on it. I Never measured it but it looks like the colors are balanced. I'll have to test mine and find out but red doesn't seem to be off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Red saturation is 35% high on a base point where green is at 0% of the total RGB satuation levels. Blue is at a slight 4% oversaturation, but it's way out of gamut (blue almost looks like neon on most SONYs). If you use the Color (saturation) control to tame red, the others are equally desaturated, so Color can't be used to fix just one color. The Hue control has little or no effect on saturation.


Red push has been a trademark with SONY and Panasonic for many years.


Anyway, people must be very fond of this design technique. Stores sell a lot of SONYs, so why should they change a successful formula?


Added 4/15/2010: Forgot to mention that I also tried cooler viewing modes, and got another shock: in cooler modes SONY has pushed Blue 20% higher than Red (!) and left Gren undersaturated. The result, of course, is Purple. Blue Gain did not have sufficient range to lower Blue and make the colors look somehwre near normal. If the so-called RGB GAIN controls were really "gain" instead of reduce, Red and Green could be upwarldy adjusted to compensate for the excess Blue. No such luck. Yet another reason why SONY tv's have turned me off for years.
 
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