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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I have a bonus room on the second floor which is above the garage and has 2 outside walls and 2 interior walls. This is new construction and we just completed insulation today and the wall between the recroom and bedromo #2 is not insulated at all. One thing going for me is there are bathrooms and closets in between both rooms but I would like to minimize any sound from making it out of the room.


I'd like for the sound to be isolated in the RecRoom as I plan on using it as a dedicated Home Theater Room. I realize I should have looked at this earlier but I am thinking that I need some additional sound insulation in that room. So this kind of eliminates ordering anything from the net...


I realize this topic has been asked a bunch but I'm in a time crunch and I'm trying to determine if I can do anything that will make much of a difference. I'm considering double drywall however I'm concerned that this alone may not do anything because of sound flanking. From what I've read you have to look at the whole picture.


So in your opinion what is my best and cheapest option to get some sound isolation. I would just like to minimize and realize it wouldn't be perfect but I want to make the right choice before we move past this point.


Thoughts or opinions. Right now I'm thinking about adding:


Batts of insulation throughout the entire room walls and ceiling

Double Drywall Walls w/ possibly drywall clips (also w/ Ceiling)

Possibly some sort of Floor isolation (Roxul? or just fiber batts?) I'm not concerned about the garage but rather sound flanking throughout the house?


Your thoughts would be very helpful! I've attached a floorplan.


BTW: The walls are standard 2x4's (not staggered) and the floor/ceilings are engineered I Beams.


Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm not sure what information in that thread is helpful to me...but I guess I will search even though I've search for hours and hours and am having trouble making sense of everything. I realize its a complicated topic that has been asked a lot but was hoping some people could give me some suggestions based on my room. Its hard to find people who have the same layout and configuration as me.


But thanks for the link.
 

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You said that you are considering batts of insulation. Does this mean that the walls are currently open? because that opens up a lot of opportunities.

If that was my space I would retroactively add additional staggered studs in between the existing ones on the shared walls. This would only consume 3/4 inch.


Add insulation everywhere.


Back butter all electrical boxes with putty pads.


Use 2 layers of 5/8 drywall with Green Glue. Use acoustical caulk everywhere for both layers.


Get a heavy door with exterior weather stripping


Replace all HVAC ductwork feeding this room with Acoustical duct unless the room has a dedicated system. Product 6b or 6m here:

http://www.flexmasterusa.com/pg/fdpp.php


Beef up the floor by adding more layers, insulation, and think about using a kinetic isolator product. Don't ask me which one as I built on concrete and didn't pay much attention to the alternatives.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes they are open...we just completed insulation.


Can you describe how I would perform the staggered studs? Would this be like just adding a 2x4 in between the studs which sticks out 3/4" thus bringing the Drywall out 3/4"? Or would it be easier to just Fir the existing studs skipping each one?


Thanks,


Justin
 

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You would not be firring to the existing studs. The idea of stagger stud framing is the elimination of any direct contact between the drywall on one side to the drywall on the other side. Firring to the studs would have to be done on both sides if you took that approach. At this point, insulation in all wall cavities, double drywall with green glue on all surfaces in the room; however, you need to deal with electrical outlets, HVAC penetrations, and light fixture penetrations.
 

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I'll pitch up the obligatory "use the search bar" comment...


Good, now that that is out of the way, here is a good pic of staggered framing:





The idea is that you use a 2x6 for your base and top and stagger 2x4s so as to isolate sound. It seems that your room is already framed in, so I don't know if it'd be worth the time and effort for you to rip down framing and replace it with staggered. I achieved great sound isolation using "regular" non-staggered framing + insulation + 2 layers of 5/8" drywall + Green glue.


-Forseti
 

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No ripping down required... Simply add 1" to the existing top and bottom plates. Nail or screw and glue. Now your 2x4 plates are "2x5". Add new studs, staggered as pictured.


As Dennis said, and as Forseti's great picture shows, the new studs don't contact the old. Great decoupling, cheap and effective.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forseti /forum/post/14309000


I'll pitch up the obligatory "use the search bar" comment...


Good, now that that is out of the way, here is a good pic of staggered framing:





The idea is that you use a 2x6 for your base and top and stagger 2x4s so as to isolate sound. It seems that your room is already framed in, so I don't know if it'd be worth the time and effort for you to rip down framing and replace it with staggered. I achieved great sound isolation using "regular" non-staggered framing + insulation + 2 layers of 5/8" drywall + Green glue.


-Forseti

All that work ruined by an open-backed LV box...



CJ
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White /forum/post/14309013


No ripping down required... Simply add 1" to the existing top and bottom plates. Nail or screw and glue. Now your 2x4 plates are "2x5". Add new studs, staggered as pictured.


As Dennis said, and as Forseti's great picture shows, the new studs don't contact the old. Great decoupling, cheap and effective.

How do you handle door frames and headers?


CJ
 

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You'd modify one or both of the studs that define a side where the jamb attaches. So perhaps both studs would be 2x3. Attach the jamb to the two 2x3s.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White /forum/post/14309219


You'd modify one or both of the studs that define a side where the jamb attaches. So perhaps both studs would be 2x3. Attach the jamb to the two 2x3s.

Any reason not to just use 2x4 but install them so that the wide part runs parallel to the length of the wall? In other words the door opening would have two 2x4 with a gap between them.
 

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No reason at all. As long as the framing fits and does not contact, there's no right or wrong.


The door jamb itself is a point of contact (bridges the decoupled studs), obviously, but not much you can do. If higher isolation is needed, a double stud wall is in order.
 

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Good answer, 'cause that's what I did. Reminds me I have to take a photo and post it.
 

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Photos are excellent to have. Maybe you wouldn't mind if we used it in an article to help answer this question in the future?
 

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Sure, although I'm sure John would whip up another sketch in no time...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White /forum/post/14310131


The door jamb itself is a point of contact (bridges the decoupled studs), obviously, but not much you can do. If higher isolation is needed, a double stud wall is in order.

That's more what I was wondering. I figured that was the answer since you still have the base plates in common as well.


Thanks,

CJ
 
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