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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone done any test to compare how cd's recoded on the cmoputer compare to the original? I am talking about serious listening on a high end system.
 

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Quote:
Has anyone done any test ...
Any test besides listening? :>)


If the disc being copied has no flaws, then the computer-copied disc will sound the same as the original, whatever system you are playing them on. However, if the original has scratches, smudges, etcetera, then if you do a direct disc-to-disc bit-copy, the PC will faithfully copy those glitches into the data stream. Upon playback, skips or other problems can occur, with no error correction, since the error-ridden data stream is being played back faithfully. On the other hand, if you play the original disc and copy it "real time" as it is being played, the player will correct errors as much as possible and the corrected data stream is what will be copied. Takes longer, but gives a greater chance of rendering a truly playable disc instead of a coaster.
 

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Talking about MAKING CDs on a computer, or COPYING them?


Most everything I've heard that came off a computer where there was actual analog audio inside has had lots of CPU noise in it. Digital copying is probably OK. I would use an outboard A/D for anything serious.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by kenglish
...Most everything I've heard that came off a computer where there was actual analog audio inside has had lots of CPU noise in it...
You must make your copies by placing a microphone next to the PC speaker. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gonglee,

You say you can hear a difference in using different media? I will have to give it a try. I do have a home cd recorder, the Phillips cdr880. It works ok, but lately I have been having alot of failed cd's, so I was wondering about making copies on my computer, if there would be any sonic benefit. With a home cd recorder you have the chance of introducing some jitter, so this would effect the quality, but with a computer, it seems like you should be able to get a better copy. Maybe I am missing something?
 

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Actually, if you put on a really good pair of headphones and surf the FM radio band with a decent tuner, you'll be amazed at (or disgusted with) the sound of most commercials..........lots of clicking, whirring, splats and squeals. Too many are recorded on cheap CPU-based systems.


Digital-to-digital copying is a whole different matter.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Burke Strickland
Any test besides listening? :>)


If the disc being copied has no flaws, then the computer-copied disc will sound the same as the original, whatever system you are playing them on. However, if the original has scratches, smudges, etcetera, then if you do a direct disc-to-disc bit-copy, the PC will faithfully copy those glitches into the data stream. Upon playback, skips or other problems can occur, with no error correction, since the error-ridden data stream is being played back faithfully. On the other hand, if you play the original disc and copy it "real time" as it is being played, the player will correct errors as much as possible and the corrected data stream is what will be copied. Takes longer, but gives a greater chance of rendering a truly playable disc instead of a coaster.
I don't believe that is an accurate description of what happens. If you play the original disc "real time" and copy it as it's being played, you only have one chance to correctly copy the incoming digital (hopefully) stream correctly, and you trust the error correction in the player to do its job faithfully (which they usually do). It is, in fact, better to digitally rip the disc into the computer, and then burn the data to a new disc (assuming, of course, that you have legal rights to do just that with the content on the disc in question). A program such as Exact Audio Copy (EAC as it is commonly known) has the ability to use multiple scans of each sector to assure that no ripping errors occur. The error correction that is present on the original disc isn't that robust, but it can be used during the ripping process to eliminate errors. Direct ripping of the PCM data, using a program like EAC, is the most secure and accurate way to read data from a CD.
 

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I don't believe that is an accurate description of what happens.
"That" is not an accurate description of what happens if you purchase and use a program like Exact Audio Copy (EAC) to first rip the CD to computer file(s) and then burn a new disc, because "that" wasn't describing that process at all. :>) But it pretty well describes what happens if you rely on the disc-to-disc direct copy facilities bundled with many new PCs (and some of them do use the term "exact", but in association with "bit-copy", not "audio").


Except for the few times the process was interrupted mid-course (like when the power went out), I've never gotten a bad disc using my described alternative (playing the original disc "real time" and recording the new disc at that time). Since the desired end result is a CD that sounds like the original, rather than necessarily the theoretical "best", I prefer that method to the more time consuming method of ripping to the PC with programs like EAC, even though that is the most secure and accurate way to read data from a CD.


It is good to have alternatives and to be able to choose which of them suits one's purpose.


Burke
 
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