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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I am converting a garage into a audio room, how can I make the room sound proof? Can soundproof insulation be used? Is it expensive? How about windows and doors?

What else do I need to know before starting a project?
 

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You need to know a lot. It is expensive to do properly, and you have to do a very THOROUGH and complete job, or you will end up spinning your wheels and wasting money unless it's a complete design AND implementation. Check the acoustics threads, and buy F. Alton Everest's Master handbook of acoustics. there are also numerous other studio construction and audio books with helpful information. to do it really right you need to decouple (room within a room) everything, and seal it up airtight, with proper HVAC design to go with that so you have proper ventilation that doesn't defeat what you've just built.

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Can soundproof insulation be used?

Yes, but this is one very small, and arguably not very significant part.

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Is it expensive?

Yes.

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How about windows and doors?

Double windows, often double doors too, massive, and well sealed. there are specialty products for this purpose (expensive). You can also do some nifty DIY door solutions like hollowcore filled with sand, heavy weatherstripping, etc.

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What else do I need to know before starting a project?

Either: a) an enormous amount. or b) hire a professional to design it, and make sure you or your countractor doesn't skimp out on the small details which are very important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the great reply.

It seems overwhelming to do right.

A contractor would not likely know anything about it so it would really need to be a hands on project.

I was hoping soundproof insulation and window and door attention would do it.
 

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Quote:
how can I make the room sound proof?

Build an isolated room within a room, with airlocks. this is how soundproof studios are built.

There is no such thing as 'soundproofing insulation'.
 

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Google for "iso booth" or "sound booth" to find some vendors that can ship you pre-built systems you can assemble at home. These are typically built as "inner rooms" with isolation going up, down, sideways and even for ventilation, so it might be an option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info and link.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eljr /forum/post/15482773


If I am converting a garage into a audio room, how can I make the room sound proof? Can soundproof insulation be used? Is it expensive? How about windows and doors?

What else do I need to know before starting a project?



You should understand why you are trying to soundproof a garage. You are trying to isolate the sound in the garage from what?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass /forum/post/15493996


You should understand why you are trying to soundproof a garage. You are trying to isolate the sound in the garage from what?

Main dwelling on one side, neighbors pool only about 10 feet away on other side.
 

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Would a layer of quiet rock over rc channel or green glue, + gasket and sealing of doors, recepticles, etc get you close to the goal without going the whole room within a room technique?
 

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Depending up personal requirements, room within a room may not be required. On the other hand RC Channel is always the wrong choice. Clips and HAT channel, please.
 

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There are two reasons for isolating any playback space (located in a garage space or otherwise):


1. You don't care to raise the sound levels in other areas of the home; and/or

2. You need to get the noise floor in your room to 22NC or lower.


These are not mutually exclusive goals; however, the requirements you wish to achieve will dictate the best methods available. One standard is, when playing back full range pink noise at 84dB SPL, you will not raise the noise floor in any adjacent space by more than 3dB SPL (a doubling).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
well, I think that we have established that I don't need complete sound proofing, thanks.

does anyone have links and More details as to what I can use to no be to disruptive to neighbors and remainder of house.

Is a rug over a plywood floor ok? What about the sealing?
 

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Rug over plywood will do nothing. Sealing will help.


Build an inner wall with 4" of insulation all around (including ceiling), similar to how you would weatherize for insulation; that will help. Hang drywall in double layers on clips; that will help. Install triple glass windows for windows. Put in two doors, with a weather seal (ideally a fire door). Make sure your vents are led through at least two 90-degree angles and a conduit that deadens sound.
 

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Hello to all... New user here. I have been considering not only sound-proofing, but also "ideal" listening room geometry as well, but I'll save that for another thread.


My question along the line of this thread is whether any of you have any experience with (or would recommend) this heavy "mass-loaded" (soft) vinyl material which is generally offered as an in-or-on-wall sound-proofing material? Also, can you share your thoughts on its effectiveness when used? Can you recommend other materials? I'm not so much concerned with keeping sound out as with keeping it in (so as not to annoy the neighbors). I'm sure that the resulting reduction in noise floor would also be an asset, although once the music starts, I don't think I (or most people, for that matter) could actually discern the difference. Thanks in advance!


CRS
 

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Quote:
I'm sure that the resulting reduction in noise floor would also be an asset, although once the music starts, I don't think I (or most people, for that matter) could actually discern the difference.

Even hearing impaired to easily discern the difference.


None-the-less, to your specific question about Mass Loaded Vinyl (MLV). It's specific physical property affecting sound isolation is its mass. To that extent it provides benefit. On the other hand, its mass is typically less than the mass of 5/8" drywall and comes at a significantly higher cost. As a damping material between two layers of drywall (or two layers of flooring), it is very ineffective and there are other materials at lower cost which are specifically designed for that purpose. Many distributors (and some manufacturers) will suggest MLV should be installed with an air gap between the MLV and the drywall. This will defeat your overall sound isolation efforts in a music/cinema playback space.
 

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Thank you for your reply, Dennis. Can you tell me more about the other materials you mentioned? I'm planning to eventually construct an addition to my home which will be purpose-built for audio-video (mostly audio though), and I figure that good sound treatments will help me and my neighbors to remain in good standing. Since I'm still in the research stage of this project, I'd greatly appreciate any insight you can share on effective treatments and materials. Also since I've yet to build this room, treatments would be included from the design stage of the project, so nothing you would suggest from an application or installation standpoint would be too crazy in my opinion. I'm also open to suggestions on room geometry, if you have any to offer. Thanks again...



CRS
 

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Any treatment strategy starts with the design (including structural) of the space. Most, as it appears you may, look at acoustic treatments as being something which starts from the drywall outward into the room. Therefore, when you ask about materials, the list is pages and pages long. While specialized materials are used, the key is to use the standard building materials correctly to achieve the results you define you want. Isolation clips and HAT channel can fall into the specialized materials list; but, if you're doing a double wall type construction, clips are likely not required. You can used viscoelastic materials for constrained layer damping (such as Green Glue); but, there are building materials already laminated in such a fashion that Green Glue would not be required. I don't want to underplay the importance of room geometry; but, on the other hand, room geometry has to play second fiddle to your requirements for space utilization. (The impact of room geometry on modal response in small ... residential sized ... spaces is rather overrated.)


Step one. Define your mission statement only then can you move on to steps 2 and beyond.
 

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Dennis, again thank you for your reply. My plans for construction do not exclude the design of a room with no two surfaces parallel, nor do they exclude the use of specialized materials, which you've mentioned, and which I'd also like to learn more of. The only material you've named specifically is Green Glue, which to me seems at a glance to be more of an afterthought to patch-up an existing space than an element to be considered in the design and construction of a purpose-built room. Of course I want a certain (planned) amount of room interaction, as it's my opinion that a certain amount of reverberation (and controlled rate of decay) with indirect reflections can actually be a desirable thing in one's enjoyment of sound... with absorption treatments applied as needed, but sparingly. I'm currently using 4" foam wedges placed via the "mirror method" to kill short reflections, but would like to plan on an improved room geometry to require less. I suspect that my room will have walls angled inward at the top in order to direct high frequency short reflections "to the carpet" and may possibly be shaped somewhat like a coffin, with absorption and trapping more toward the rear of the intended listening area to keep it from coming back to that location. I've looked at your site, and can say that I don't require a "theme" in my listening room. The purpose of the room is audio first, aesthetics last. Does this define my mission statement sufficiently?
I'd be happy to hear more of your thoughts on this... I have an empty canvas at this point, imagination is the limit. Thanks again....


CRS
 
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