AVS Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I know there are many threads here on blocking sound but looking for some specific feedback on what I'd like to do. This is a brand new home, so much of this work is painful for me to even do, so keep that in mind.

Issue: Sound transfer from family room into master bedroom above. I have in-ceiling speakers (I know, I know) with zero insulation above. There is a massive amount of sound that transfers to the bedroom from the speakers. In addition, when my wife is walking upstairs you can literally hear booming from her steps and some creaks because the joists are the cheap pre-made type. So, I want to try to reduce the noise transfer for these two issues.

Idea: Build speaker boxes-I've seen some instructions on here that effectively has two layers (Plywood or MDF, Green Glue and then drywall) and the frame that is glued (green glue) to the drywall to seal sound in the box. Add a layer of MLV underneath the carpet and pad in the room upstairs. Spray in cellulose insulation in the ceiling. In addition I am thinking of adding a layer of drywall to my ceiling downstairs with green glue in between or maybe even another layer of MLV sandwiched in between. I know that resilient channel would be a good idea here but the loss in height in the ceiling concerns me. The ceiling is a little under 9' and I'm worried this will make the room feel more enclosed.

Please tear my idea apart, let me know how much reduction in sound I might expect, give me a better idea. i do not expect to be sound proof at all but I would like to at least be able to watch TV with the in ceiling speakers (at low volume level) when my wife hits the sack before me. I'd also like to significantly reduce the footfall noise from walking upstairs.

Thanks in advance for the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
I am using DynaBox for my kitchen speakers. It substantially reduces the amount of sound traveling upstairs. Some sounds still get through especially bass (as nothing much can stop it). Maybe you can try a couple to see whether they are sufficient. Also, is the bedroom floor carpet or hardwood? If it is carpet then you may be able to use the DynaPad product (from the same manufacturer) underneath the carpet pad to avoid ripping the whole ceiling up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Hi,

I know there are many threads here on blocking sound but looking for some specific feedback on what I'd like to do. This is a brand new home, so much of this work is painful for me to even do, so keep that in mind.

Issue: Sound transfer from family room into master bedroom above. I have in-ceiling speakers (I know, I know) with zero insulation above. There is a massive amount of sound that transfers to the bedroom from the speakers. In addition, when my wife is walking upstairs you can literally hear booming from her steps and some creaks because the joists are the cheap pre-made type. So, I want to try to reduce the noise transfer for these two issues.

Idea: Build speaker boxes-I've seen some instructions on here that effectively has two layers (Plywood or MDF, Green Glue and then drywall) and the frame that is glued (green glue) to the drywall to seal sound in the box. Add a layer of MLV underneath the carpet and pad in the room upstairs. Spray in cellulose insulation in the ceiling. In addition I am thinking of adding a layer of drywall to my ceiling downstairs with green glue in between or maybe even another layer of MLV sandwiched in between. I know that resilient channel would be a good idea here but the loss in height in the ceiling concerns me. The ceiling is a little under 9' and I'm worried this will make the room feel more enclosed.

Please tear my idea apart, let me know how much reduction in sound I might expect, give me a better idea. i do not expect to be sound proof at all but I would like to at least be able to watch TV with the in ceiling speakers (at low volume level) when my wife hits the sack before me. I'd also like to significantly reduce the footfall noise from walking upstairs.

Thanks in advance for the help!
The creaking when walking upstairs makes me think there isn't any cross bracing between the joists...that being said, I would say you came up with a pretty good plan. From reading on here, it seems that people say that insulation between the joists doesn't help much, but when we built our house, we insulated all the interior walls and I would say that it has helped alot. Now, if you want a different (and more time consuming/costly) approach: rip the drywall off the ceiling of the lower level. Add bracing between the joists (1x2's with ends cut on 45 degree angle in cris-cross pattern between each joist). Insulate between the joists, MLV, plywood, green glue and then drywall. The MLV upstairs might be enough to quite things down (maybe even add another layer of 3/4" plywood under the carpet screwed down, although will make problems with baseboard and doors) and I would suggest first plan of action before all the costs (your idea or mine) downstairs. If you do rip up the carpet upstairs, consider adding screws to the plywood (into the joists), it is usually just nailed down and the screws will be a minor help, but cheap. Fair warning: I am not an expert by any means!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. I actually bought two of the dynabox but have not installed them (5 speakers are in-ceiling). I know there is not much I can do with bass, so that is something we'll need to live with. After buying them I just thought that more would be needed.

Regarding bracing - I was thinking the same thing and am very close to ordering the architectural plans from the city to see what was designed and then looking in the ceiling to see what is there. I actually told one of the builder folks about this (assistant to the GC) and he didn't disagree that it would be a good idea. I was also thinking of screwing down the plywood but I won't be able to add a second layer since I would have to do it to my whole second floor. That would be a significant effort and cost, but hoping one layer of MLV above won't be noticeable if I don't lay it across the whole second floor.

I am going to get a drywall guy in here to see what he'd charge to rip and replace my ceiling. Adding bracing feels like a good idea - I mean I can feel my floor bouncing upstairs when my wife walks on it. Also adding the mlv, plywood, green glue, drywall would be a very good thing for sound blocking.

Any other comments or ideas appreciated...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,089 Posts
Have you considered a great pair of headphones?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top