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I looked up Sonopan but the manufacturer did not include any test data that I could find on their web page. As a result of no test data and substantially less mass than 5/8 Type X drywall, I think the double drywall with Green Glue option will give you better results. Option 3 is what is shown on the Mfg’s web page, but I suspect a 3rd layer of drywall would be cheaper and more effective.

Mike
 

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I looked up Sonopan but the manufacturer did not include any test data that I could find on their web page. As a result of no test data and substantially less mass than 5/8 Type X drywall, I think the double drywall with Green Glue option will give you better results. Option 3 is what is shown on the Mfg’s web page, but I suspect a 3rd layer of drywall would be cheaper and more effective.

Mike
Between
A: sonopan + drywall
B: drywall + drywall
Choose b to reduce noise transmission.

Sonopan is more expensive if I recall correctly. It's not as dense as 5/8 type x drywall. Maybe the panels would be better used as part of an assembly for acoustic panel, but not to reduce acoustical transmission

Cheers

-Matt
 

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I'm debating between the best sound proofing solution for the ceiling:

  • option 1: Sonopan + 5/8" drywall
  • option 2: 2 layers of 5/8" drywall + green glue
Which option would be more effective? Is it possible to use green glue between Sonopan and 5/8" drywall? I'm not sure if I should just introduce option 3 at this point - Sonopan + 2 layers of 5/8" drywall + green glue.

There is also an option to use Reflex-or between the two sheets of 5/8" drywall instead of green glue, but I don't know if that is a proven option at all.
Option 3: 5/8" drywall + green glue + 5/8" drywall + green glue + 5/8" drywall

Per comments above, it's unfortunate, but you are going to find a lot of snake-oil salesmen in the A/V business. The prevailing wisdom on this forum is no published independent lab test results = don't even consider it. Furthermore, once you have tackled decoupling, mass is the most significant factor (i.e. add more drywall is the best choice under most circumstances).
 

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Thanks. I want to reduce the sound of the waking above and voices. It doesn’t need to be “perfect” but it needs to be muted.
The "devil is in the details" in the sense every custom room has a unique set of variables. However, setting that fact aside for a moment....

What you'll be endeavoring to do is mute two types of sound effects: airborne noise (HT room up to room above) and impact noise (1st floor into HT room). Therefore, you need a solution that works well under both circumstances.

The tried-and-true methods on this forum will apply to you. Your best bet is going to be a combination of:

1. Room-within-a-room (dedicated and isolated HT room in the basement); preferably double stud walls and floating ceiling; 2x 5/8" drywall / Green Glue sandwich on the interior of the interior stud wall
2. If no. 1 is not an option, look at clips & channel or a combination of clips & channel and staggered or double stud walls. For instance, clips & channel ceiling if you are height constrained in the HT room.
3. In your case I would strongly recommend applying drywall sheets in the joist cavities of your basement (below the 1st floor); i.e. 5/8" drywall + Green Glue + 5/8" drywall sandwich
4. After you've done no. 3 above, apply "pink fluffy" (i.e. fiberglass) or mineral wool (Roxul) insulation bats between the pre-existing ceiling joists (basement ceiling), under the drywall sandwiches

You'll need to remove the existing ceiling in your basement.
 

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Thanks everyone for your insightful feedback. I ended up going with option 3: Sonopan + 5/8 drywall + green glue + 5/8 drywall. During my early days of research, I was told unless if I wanted to do infloor heating and remove all heating ducts in the room, it doesn't make too much difference with my sound proofing treatments. Instead the video suggested to shoot for a solution that offered STC50 or so.

I found a bit of stats on Sonopan, but it may not mean too much because the document is not readily available on the Sonopan site.

I had to look up Sonopan, I had never heard of it. From what I have learned you want decoupling, mass, absorption and damping. I would think if you use the Sonopan it should go on the last layer I am guessing. for my theater I was going to do 2 layers of 5/8" drywall between the joist with Green Glue, clips and hat channel, 2 more layers of 5/8" drywall and Green Glue.

Like this for Level 3:

https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing-solutions/soundproofing-ceilings

I would think drywall would be better and cheaper then the Sonopan stuff. That's just my two cents on it. Others may chime in after the holiday's are over.
I've never heard of Sonopan until I saw a FB ad either. I contemplated doing level 3 with my theatre, but my contractor refused to attach drywall to the subfloor because the sheets could fall off and get in the way if I ever want the floor upstairs replaced.


I looked up Sonopan but the manufacturer did not include any test data that I could find on their web page. As a result of no test data and substantially less mass than 5/8 Type X drywall, I think the double drywall with Green Glue option will give you better results. Option 3 is what is shown on the Mfg’s web page, but I suspect a 3rd layer of drywall would be cheaper and more effective.

Mike
After I had Sonopan installed, I suspect that it may not do that much either. If I were to do it again, I'll prob opt for 3 sheets of drywall with Green Glue.

Between
A: sonopan + drywall
B: drywall + drywall
Choose b to reduce noise transmission.

Sonopan is more expensive if I recall correctly. It's not as dense as 5/8 type x drywall. Maybe the panels would be better used as part of an assembly for acoustic panel, but not to reduce acoustical transmission

Cheers

-Matt
I have 2.5 sheets of Sonopan left over, and I think the dimples will work as a diffusor of some sort - similar to how TAD panels may work. I'm going to try to use the left over as the room facing layer of acoustic panels. This would be interesting!

Option 3: 5/8" drywall + green glue + 5/8" drywall + green glue + 5/8" drywall

Per comments above, it's unfortunate, but you are going to find a lot of snake-oil salesmen in the A/V business. The prevailing wisdom on this forum is no published independent lab test results = don't even consider it. Furthermore, once you have tackled decoupling, mass is the most significant factor (i.e. add more drywall is the best choice under most circumstances).
Agreed!

The "devil is in the details" in the sense every custom room has a unique set of variables. However, setting that fact aside for a moment....

What you'll be endeavoring to do is mute two types of sound effects: airborne noise (HT room up to room above) and impact noise (1st floor into HT room). Therefore, you need a solution that works well under both circumstances.

The tried-and-true methods on this forum will apply to you. Your best bet is going to be a combination of:

1. Room-within-a-room (dedicated and isolated HT room in the basement); preferably double stud walls and floating ceiling; 2x 5/8" drywall / Green Glue sandwich on the interior of the interior stud wall
2. If no. 1 is not an option, look at clips & channel or a combination of clips & channel and staggered or double stud walls. For instance, clips & channel ceiling if you are height constrained in the HT room.
3. In your case I would strongly recommend applying drywall sheets in the joist cavities of your basement (below the 1st floor); i.e. 5/8" drywall + Green Glue + 5/8" drywall sandwich
4. After you've done no. 3 above, apply "pink fluffy" (i.e. fiberglass) or mineral wool (Roxul) insulation bats between the pre-existing ceiling joists (basement ceiling), under the drywall sandwiches

You'll need to remove the existing ceiling in your basement.
For my interior walls, I managed to convince my contractor to build 2 layers of walls and cover 3 surfaces with 5/8" drywall. Every surface inside the HT room has at least two layers of 5/8" drywall with green glue.

I couldn't convinced my contractor to install drywall in the joist cavities so I ended up with 3 layers in the ceiling. Hopefully that's good enough anyways.
 

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I don't see how the sheets would fall off between the joists when Green Glue and screws are used to attach them. When contractors don't understand something they come up with some funny ideas. This is why I plan to do most of my work myself. Hope it all works. I think my wife understands why I want to soundproof my theater after I was watching Aquaman yesterday while her mom and her were putting Christmas decorations away. I only have one 12" sub running powered by 200 watts. If I ever get my 15" subs working it is really going to drive her nuts.

I hope to plan on doing level 3 from Soundproofing company for the ceiling. I will decouple walls with IB-3 clips and double drywall with Green Glue.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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I don't see how the sheets would fall off between the joists when Green Glue and screws are used to attach them. When contractors don't understand something they come up with some funny ideas. This is why I plan to do most of my work myself. Hope it all works. I think my wife understands why I want to soundproof my theater after I was watching Aquaman yesterday while her mom and her were putting Christmas decorations away. I only have one 12" sub running powered by 200 watts. If I ever get my 15" subs working it is really going to drive her nuts.

I hope to plan on doing level 3 from Soundproofing company for the ceiling. I will decouple walls with IB-3 clips and double drywall with Green Glue.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
I totally get where you're coming from. Time is hard to come by these days. Otherwise, I'd totally do it myself.

I'm going to run two 18" LMS Ultra with 7000 watts peak, so I think I'm going to have a problem regardless of what I do. :(
 

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I couldn't convinced my contractor to install drywall in the joist cavities so I ended up with 3 layers in the ceiling. Hopefully that's good enough anyways.
You will likely be fine. The purpose of drywall in between the original ceiling joist cavities in the basement was primarily to add additional muffling of impact noise from the floor above the HT room. However, with a room-within-a-room double stud configuration and a thick ceiling within that inner room, it's not very likely you will have any issues regardless.

Now, having said that, I don't quite understand the reluctance on the part of your contractor to add the drywall between the joists. It sounds as if he may have misunderstood the concept. I can't see how it would have any possible impact on the flooring of the 1st floor above, since it would be attached to the underside of what is the sub-floor for your 1st floor level (basement facing side). There would be no reason to - for example - rip out your 1st floor's sub-floor when replacing the finished floor material at some future date. The only reason sub-floor is ever replaced is when there's something wrong with it. The most common reason for that is water damage from a burst pipe. All scenarios that have nothing to do with the underside of that sub-floor. Even if you ever did need to replace it, big whoop. You would be yanking some additional drywall with it (from beneath).


I don't see how the sheets would fall off between the joists when Green Glue and screws are used to attach them. When contractors don't understand something they come up with some funny ideas. This is why I plan to do most of my work myself. Hope it all works.
+1 !
 

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@HT Geek, to save a little money would just adding one layer between the joist with Green Glue help? If I keep my room around 14'x25' the cost isn't as bad as if I go larger.

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@HT Geek, to save a little money would just adding one layer between the joist with Green Glue help? If I keep my room around 14'x25' the cost isn't as bad as if I go larger.
I've forgotten the details of your plan.

Presuming ground floor (no living space below) and a room-within-a-room design, I think it depends on what you're dealing with in terms of floor noise from above into HT room or vice-versa. If there's say hardwood or tile floors above, then impact noise from above into HT room might be a concern. If that is true then I'd do it (drywall in between structural ceiling joists).

If the concern is more airborne sound from HT room emanating upward into room/floor above, I'd be more inclined to go with an additional layer of drywall (mass) in the ceiling of your "inner" HT room.

If airborne noise from floor above moving down into HT room is the concern (vs. impact), I'd be inclined to add the additional mass in between structural ceiling joists. And for that matter, even if you have no concerns, it won't hurt.

I think it all depends on your use case. You will never regret adding more damping (from a performance perspective). However, at some point we all have to think about the cost and effort vs reward. At least drywall is cheap, so if you perform the labor yourself it's mostly a concern of the Green Glue's cost. It's a chore to add that mass in the ceiling if you intend to be meticulous about sealing gaps (though again, what is your use case)? If the primary concern is impact noise from above, personally I would say even if you are not anal retentive about sealing the perimeter of the drywall pieces inside the joists, that extra mass will help significantly because you're damping that impact noise directly at the source with more mass. If the concern is airborne noise and it's a high priority (presumably why you'd want to take on this extra work in the first place), then I'd be more inclined to take my time and do a good job of sealing the perimeters. You won't get a 2nd chance to add improvements in that space (between joists).
 

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My room is in my basement under my kitchen and most of my living room. I am thinking of doing it for kind of both reasons you talked about. To help with noise coming in from above when people are walking and to help some with the bass. I know it wont stop it, but should help slow it down. The plan is to decouple the walls to the ceiling above, clips and channel on the ceiling. Double drywall all around with Green Glue. I have one working 12" sub powered only with 200 watts and my wife and mother in law were commenting that it was pretty loud when I was watching Aquaman. I wasn't even near reference. The cost of the Green Glue is what I will have a hard time getting the wife to but off on, but she will understand when its done.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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My room is in my basement under my kitchen and most of my living room. I am thinking of doing it for kind of both reasons you talked about. To help with noise coming in from above when people are walking and to help some with the bass.
Gotcha. Coming back to me now. :)

I would do the drywall between ceiling joists; especially given you have the kitchen above.

As far as GG is concerned, you will get 80% of the benefit even if you cut the amount of Green Glue in 1/2. For example, one tube per 4x8 drywall sheet instead of the recommended two.
 

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You will likely be fine. The purpose of drywall in between the original ceiling joist cavities in the basement was primarily to add additional muffling of impact noise from the floor above the HT room. However, with a room-within-a-room double stud configuration and a thick ceiling within that inner room, it's not very likely you will have any issues regardless.

Now, having said that, I don't quite understand the reluctance on the part of your contractor to add the drywall between the joists. It sounds as if he may have misunderstood the concept. I can't see how it would have any possible impact on the flooring of the 1st floor above, since it would be attached to the underside of what is the sub-floor for your 1st floor level (basement facing side). There would be no reason to - for example - rip out your 1st floor's sub-floor when replacing the finished floor material at some future date. The only reason sub-floor is ever replaced is when there's something wrong with it. The most common reason for that is water damage from a burst pipe. All scenarios that have nothing to do with the underside of that sub-floor. Even if you ever did need to replace it, big whoop. You would be yanking some additional drywall with it (from beneath).




+1 !
I guess time will tell! My contractor was worried about walking above might make the drywall fall down. I know it's all BS excuses because he's also recommending a single door instead of communicating door (two layers of single doors into the HT).

Either way, you have to draw the line somewhere and I'm curious to see how my room will turn out.
 

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I guess time will tell! My contractor was worried about walking above might make the drywall fall down. I know it's all BS excuses because he's also recommending a single door instead of communicating door (two layers of single doors into the HT).

Seriously, he thought that drywall glue and screwed under the sub floor would fall when walking on the floor above? Sorry I would laughed at him and said how is that possible. I think he didn't want to do it and came up with a silly answer. His thinking is flawed in that there are less screws in ceiling drywall for a two story home and it doesn't fall off the ceiling.

Either way, you have to draw the line somewhere and I'm curious to see how my room will turn out.

Glad you are good with it and hope it works for you. It should make a difference.
 

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I guess time will tell! My contractor was worried about walking above might make the drywall fall down. I know it's all BS excuses because he's also recommending a single door instead of communicating door (two layers of single doors into the HT).

Either way, you have to draw the line somewhere and I'm curious to see how my room will turn out.
If foot fall above is a concern I would do it. In my room I did hat channel and clips with one layer of OSB, GG, and one layer of 5/8" firerock. You can hear faint footfall from the master bath above. having said that its not a huge issue for us since its our bedroom but if this was a high traffic area I would be bummed.
 

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I guess time will tell! My contractor was worried about walking above might make the drywall fall down.
Is that your drywall contractor? Have they installed a ceiling before? :rolleyes:

When in doubt, use more screws. The drywall stuck to the underside of ceiling joists need not be finished or pretty. No one will ever see it.

I know it's all BS excuses because he's also recommending a single door instead of communicating door (two layers of single doors into the HT).
2x single doors constructed how, exactly? Glued together to make a denser, single door? Or one opening in and one opening outward and facing back to back?

I would not do the latter. Unless implemented very thoughtfully, that approach is going to 1) be inconvenient for you (usability/human factor); and 2) make 2x more gaps for sound to leak through if not mitigated (i.e. either more sound leaks or more work to prevent more sound leaks).

The purpose of communicating doors is to create an air pocket that helps to isolate sound on either side of the room. If you can't do that, you're better off with a single heaving massively heavy door (or as close to that as you can get).
 

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Is that your drywall contractor? Have they installed a ceiling before? :rolleyes:

When in doubt, use more screws. The drywall stuck to the underside of ceiling joists need not be finished or pretty. No one will ever see it.



2x single doors constructed how, exactly? Glued together to make a denser, single door? Or one opening in and one opening outward and facing back to back?

I would not do the latter. Unless implemented very thoughtfully, that approach is going to 1) be inconvenient for you (usability/human factor); and 2) make 2x more gaps for sound to leak through if not mitigated (i.e. either more sound leaks or more work to prevent more sound leaks).

The purpose of communicating doors is to create an air pocket that helps to isolate sound on either side of the room. If you can't do that, you're better off with a single heaving massively heavy door (or as close to that as you can get).
I'm referring to the latter where one opening in and one opening outward and facing back to back? For the single door, he agreed to attach MDF to both sides of a solid core door and add some more strips of MDF to make a shaker design. For what it's worth, that's good enough for now.

My HT is below the kitchen, but it won't be in use until the kids go to bed. I don't think foot steps will be a huge issue.
 

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I'm referring to the latter where one opening in and one opening outward and facing back to back? For the single door, he agreed to attach MDF to both sides of a solid core door and add some more strips of MDF to make a shaker design. For what it's worth, that's good enough for now...
You may want to pic a door you like and then add both layers of MDF to one side, may save some effort and money by only having to modify one side of the door.
 

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On the inside of the theatre should I fit 5/8 PB or 5/8 Acoustic PB?
To be fitted to decoupled studs with OSB first layer - probably using Green Glue inbetween the layers.
I'm in the UK but the stated mass and price is as follows:


Standard 5/8 PB

6.3Kg/m2
$9-10

Acoustic PB
11kg/m2
$14.40
 
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