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On the inside of the theatre should I fit 5/8 PB or 5/8 Acoustic PB?
To be fitted to decoupled studs with OSB first layer - probably using Green Glue inbetween the layers.
I'm in the UK but the stated mass and price is as follows:


Standard 5/8 PB

6.3Kg/m2
$9-10

Acoustic PB
11kg/m2
$14.40
Definitely get the Acoustic. Math says it's the same weight as fire rated type X here in the states, which is what we generally use. Mass is your friend.
 

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Having never used clips and channel before (and I doubt my builder has either), is it straight forward?

I can afford and have no issues fitting clip and channels, beyond the fact that it makes the build more specialist / complex. Part of me wants to just screw that double PB in to the joists for simplicity. Do you use special screws fit screwing in to the channel? And it holds just like a screw would in a joist? Just looks so thin and flimsy.... -_-

And then, mounting the projector. If my first layer is 3/4 inch OSB, then 5/8 PB, then add extra clips near the projector and just mount to the OSB. Ignore the joists?
 

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Having never used clips and channel before (and I doubt my builder has either), is it straight forward?

I can afford and have no issues fitting clip and channels, beyond the fact that it makes the build more specialist / complex. Part of me wants to just screw that double PB in to the joists for simplicity. Do you use special screws fit screwing in to the channel? And it holds just like a screw would in a joist? Just looks so thin and flimsy.... -_-

And then, mounting the projector. If my first layer is 3/4 inch OSB, then 5/8 PB, then add extra clips near the projector and just mount to the OSB. Ignore the joists?

I will try an answer this, but @HTGeek would be a better person to answer.

The easiest answer is to work with a company like The Soundproofing Company and buy their products and they will help you out on what to do. You give them your room dimensions and they will help you with a plan as to where to put the clips. You would install all the clips first, then the hat channel. Make sure to overlap the channels and put some screws in it.

https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/

There are different types of clips, but they all screw into a joist and they should sell you the correct screws for the clips. The correct hat channel is plenty strong to hold up 3 layers of 5/8" drywall with 2 layers of green glue.

You could do your 1st layer with OSB, but I have heard it can be difficult to deal with at times. Again The Soundproofing company could help you out with this as well. You can send them an email and ask them questions.

Here is an installation video I found.

https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+install+clips+and+hat+channel&rlz=1C1GCEA_enUS865US865&oq=how+to+install+clips+and+hat+channel&aqs=chrome..69i57j0.19999j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&safe=active&ssui=on#kpvalbx=_lTgeXu66HpP0tAbtnbn4Aw32
 

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On the inside of the theatre should I fit 5/8 PB or 5/8 Acoustic PB?
To be fitted to decoupled studs with OSB first layer - probably using Green Glue inbetween the layers.
I'm in the UK but the stated mass and price is as follows:


Standard 5/8 PB

6.3Kg/m2
$9-10

Acoustic PB
11kg/m2
$14.40
What is PB? Particle Board? I hope not. It practically crumbles if you even point the business end of a screw at it.


Having never used clips and channel before (and I doubt my builder has either), is it straight forward?

I can afford and have no issues fitting clip and channels, beyond the fact that it makes the build more specialist / complex. Part of me wants to just screw that double PB in to the joists for simplicity. Do you use special screws fit screwing in to the channel? And it holds just like a screw would in a joist? Just looks so thin and flimsy.... -_-

And then, mounting the projector. If my first layer is 3/4 inch OSB, then 5/8 PB, then add extra clips near the projector and just mount to the OSB. Ignore the joists?
Depends on a variety of factors. Most modern PJs are light enough to mount to double drywall, OSB, or a combination, etc. However, I would suggest you consult the PJ manufacturer's recommendations. I personally prefer mounting it directly to a joist or cross-member, but that requires careful pre-planning and a build strategy that allows for it (e.g. floating ceiling; aka Room-within-a-Room / double studs).


The easiest answer is to work with a company like The Soundproofing Company and buy their products and they will help you out on what to do. You give them your room dimensions and they will help you with a plan as to where to put the clips. You would install all the clips first, then the hat channel. Make sure to overlap the channels and put some screws in it.

https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/

There are different types of clips, but they all screw into a joist and they should sell you the correct screws for the clips. The correct hat channel is plenty strong to hold up 3 layers of 5/8" drywall with 2 layers of green glue.
Agreed. Though since @Harkon is in the UK, he/she may not want to buy from SPC due to shipping costs. I have heard there are decent suppliers of Green Glue products in the UK, but I cannot vouch for any from experience.


You could do your 1st layer with OSB, but I have heard it can be difficult to deal with at times. Again The Soundproofing company could help you out with this as well. You can send them an email and ask them questions.
I would recommend you avoid using OSB, plywood, or particle board for walls and ceiling unless you have a good reason to do so. Some people use a few sheets as the inner layer to provide additional support where they know it will be needed (e.g. projector, light fixtures). The use of PB is controversial. It's very heavy - which is of course nice except for the part where you have to lift it - but my hangup personally is I feel it tends to partially disintegrate when screws are run through it. That makes me nervous. I'd be particularly concerned with using it on a ceiling, where gravity is constantly trying to rip it off. If you are going to use it, I'd suggest to be very conscientious in your application.

I used to think it was a good idea to use OSB or plywood all over, however after further research and listening to the experience of others on this forum, I have come around to recommending all drywall as an alternative. Relatively equal mass and cost (to OSB where I live; cheaper than plywood), more consistent audio damping results, less messy/easier to work with (e.g. drywall is much easier to cut during installation), and almost as sturdy when it comes to securing most objects.

EDIT: I used OSB as the first layer in my room's walls and ceiling. It was a massive P.I.T.A. to work with when it was necessary to trim boards. Drywall is so much easier. With the latter you can use a knife and you can leave a little overage while test fitting, trim a bit off with a sander or the knife, re-test, etc. With OSB, trimming very thin bits off when you've almost but not quite got the right dimensions is very challenging without overdoing it.

If you _do_ feel a need for a wood-based inner layer, I would favor plywood. It catches screws much better. Particle board is the worst (IMHO). OSB is in between. YMMV and others may disagree. I won't argue with them. It's a touchy subject based on one's personal experiences. This is just my opinion, FWIW.

In my room, above my PJ is 2" of plywood supporting it (Green Glued together). I could probably hang a 300 lb. PJ from it and it would be fine. I used that in two locations during the build (18" square plywood sections) because I had not made a final decision on PJ placement. The 18x18 inch PJ supports are attached to my ceiling joists, which I would ordinarily not recommend (I know, I'm a bit of a hypocrite in this regard), but my current room starting point was not ideal and it was not worthwhile financially to make it perfect. It's also top floor with attic above, so I was not terribly concerned about the space above in the center of the room where those PJ mounts are located. I also wanted the ability to hang ANY projector in the future without worrying about it. I traded overkill in one area (PJ weight support) for a sacrifice in another (coupling those PJ mounts to the original ceiling joists). All I can say now is it's worked out quite well. No complaints from me or the neighbors. LoL. :)
 

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Thanks for all the input. OSB was mainly to make building a soffit/pelmet alot easier as I wouldn't have to hit joists to secure it.

To explain 'PB' is plasterboard not particle board (What you guys call Drywall on your side of the pond- I'm in the UK).

I thought I'd done well changing my metric measurements in to inches but I missed that one sorry. Sorry to cause confusion.

Will have a think about using two layers of 'drywall' rather than OSB. OSB seems to work out quite alot more expensive as well so needs tome thought.
 

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Thanks for all the input. OSB was mainly to make building a soffit/pelmet alot easier as I wouldn't have to hit joists to secure it.

To explain 'PB' is plasterboard not particle board (What you guys call Drywall on your side of the pond- I'm in the UK).

I thought I'd done well changing my metric measurements in to inches but I missed that one sorry. Sorry to cause confusion.

Will have a think about using two layers of 'drywall' rather than OSB. OSB seems to work out quite alot more expensive as well so needs tome thought.
I actually did the first layer of my ceiling in OSB followed by GG and a layer of 5/8" fire rock for that reason. Made installing my soffits much easier as I could screw anywhere I wanted. I have read many posts about how hard OSB is to work with and I'll admit it takes more time than drywall but I didn't find it to be any big deal either.
 

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soundproofing condo common wall

Hey everyone,

I've read most of this incredibly detailed thread to educate myself about a common bedroom wall in my condo. Removing the drywall presents a pretty big challenge due to HOA hurdles, so I really prefer a retrofit solution.

Currently I can barely hear noises coming through the bedroom wall. If the neighbors yell at their dog or the dog barks, I can probably hear that. I can hear doors slamming, but I cannot hear general conversations. Problem is, I am a light sleeper and once I'm on edge, it's hard to fall back asleep.

Obviously this thread seems to always push one of two recommendations: 1) remove existing drywall and add clips (not possible for me) or 2) add additional drywall with green glue sandwiched in.

I am thinking of having a contractor add 5/8 inch QuietRock or SilentFX with two tubes of GG per panel. That seems to be the standard recommendation of this thread, but then I'll see an occasional response saying that the only correct answer is to install clips.

Can anyone who has experience in retrofitting chime in? I'm curious to hear the results from someone who's actually done this. Thanks!
 

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Hey everyone,

I've read most of this incredibly detailed thread to educate myself about a common bedroom wall in my condo. Removing the drywall presents a pretty big challenge due to HOA hurdles, so I really prefer a retrofit solution.

Currently I can barely hear noises coming through the bedroom wall. If the neighbors yell at their dog or the dog barks, I can probably hear that. I can hear doors slamming, but I cannot hear general conversations. Problem is, I am a light sleeper and once I'm on edge, it's hard to fall back asleep.

Obviously this thread seems to always push one of two recommendations: 1) remove existing drywall and add clips (not possible for me) or 2) add additional drywall with green glue sandwiched in.

I am thinking of having a contractor add 5/8 inch QuietRock or SilentFX with two tubes of GG per panel. That seems to be the standard recommendation of this thread, but then I'll see an occasional response saying that the only correct answer is to install clips.

Can anyone who has experience in retrofitting chime in? I'm curious to hear the results from someone who's actually done this. Thanks!
I've had this same situation and the easiest and best solution is to add a layer of 5/8 inch Quiet Rock. You can use GG but if you are going to have someone do it for you, the cost might be a wash. Quiet Rock is expensive but the soundproofing is uniform and very easy for a contractor to install. GG you have to watch them, more labor, unless they have worked with it and have experience. In my case I was able to remove the existing sheetrock, take out all the insulation, replace it with Roxell sound insulation, seal all the outlets, etc, then put back 5/8 inch Quiet Rock. It worked great. I got about a 55db reduction in sound transmission. You won't hear voices or ordinary noise any more.
 

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I've had this same situation and the easiest and best solution is to add a layer of 5/8 inch Quiet Rock. You can use GG but if you are going to have someone do it for you, the cost might be a wash. Quiet Rock is expensive but the soundproofing is uniform and very easy for a contractor to install. GG you have to watch them, more labor, unless they have worked with it and have experience. In my case I was able to remove the existing sheetrock, take out all the insulation, replace it with Roxell sound insulation, seal all the outlets, etc, then put back 5/8 inch Quiet Rock. It worked great. I got about a 55db reduction in sound transmission. You won't hear voices or ordinary noise any more.
Awesome, so basically you are of the opinion that Quiet Rock is good at blocking sound. Did you install it on the studs or with clips?

To be clear, my proposal is to use green glue between the existing drywall and the Quiet Rock. So I would have a double dry wall, plus green glue inside. From the videos I've watched, I sort of trust that my contractor can figure out how to apply the GG, but I guess you never know.

If I were to take out the drywall I would incur a ton more expenses to get my HOA on board, plus they have all kinds of dumb rules about trash because I guess I can't just put the old drywall in the dumpster lmao.
 

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Awesome, so basically you are of the opinion that Quiet Rock is good at blocking sound. Did you install it on the studs or with clips?

To be clear, my proposal is to use green glue between the existing drywall and the Quiet Rock. So I would have a double dry wall, plus green glue inside. From the videos I've watched, I sort of trust that my contractor can figure out how to apply the GG, but I guess you never know.

If I were to take out the drywall I would incur a ton more expenses to get my HOA on board, plus they have all kinds of dumb rules about trash because I guess I can't just put the old drywall in the dumpster lmao.

If you're planning to add a layer of drywall, with Green Glue in between, I'm not sure substituting QuietRock makes much sense. QuietRock is an alternative to drywall with Green Glue sandwiched in between. Instead, I'd just get the heaviest drywall you can get. But be aware that you're not doing any isolation (e.g. clips and channel or dual wall), so especially lower frequencies will travel more readily through the framing.
 

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If you're planning to add a layer of drywall, with Green Glue in between, I'm not sure substituting QuietRock makes much sense. QuietRock is an alternative to drywall with Green Glue sandwiched in between. Instead, I'd just get the heaviest drywall you can get. But be aware that you're not doing any isolation (e.g. clips and channel or dual wall), so especially lower frequencies will travel more readily through the framing.
I knew that QR has its own glue sandwiched in between but sort of assumed that QR would outperform regular dry wall even with the green glue applied in between. Am I totally wrong on that?

Also aware that the clips are strongly recommended but I feel like my hands are tied due to the existing wall. Is there anything that could go over an existing wall without creating a triple leaf? Or just stick to the GG and/or QR combo?
 

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I knew that QR has its own glue sandwiched in between but sort of assumed that QR would outperform regular dry wall even with the green glue applied in between. Am I totally wrong on that?

Also aware that the clips are strongly recommended but I feel like my hands are tied due to the existing wall. Is there anything that could go over an existing wall without creating a triple leaf? Or just stick to the GG and/or QR combo?

I'm not aware of any studies of QR used in a sandwich configuration with either conventional drywall or another sheet of QR, and I'd be surprised if anyone's done the study. My hunch is that you're better off using the heaviest drywall you can, and maybe even two layers of it if that's feasible, on top of your existing drywall layer, rather than QR. But maybe Big or others have actual experience or can speculate in a more informed way?


Nope, there's no way for you to use clips of any kind to create isolation without removing existing drywall and without creating a triple leaf. I think you're better off adding as much mass as possible, i.e. one or two layers of drywall on top of the existing drywall. My hunch is that the benefit of GG is lower without isolation, but there should should still be some benefit.
 

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I knew that QR has its own glue sandwiched in between but sort of assumed that QR would outperform regular dry wall even with the green glue applied in between. Am I totally wrong on that?

Also aware that the clips are strongly recommended but I feel like my hands are tied due to the existing wall. Is there anything that could go over an existing wall without creating a triple leaf? Or just stick to the GG and/or QR combo?

I'm not aware of any studies of QR used in a sandwich configuration with either conventional drywall or another sheet of QR, and I'd be surprised if anyone's done the study. My hunch is that you're better off using the heaviest drywall you can, and maybe even two layers of it if that's feasible, on top of your existing drywall layer, rather than QR. But maybe Big or others have actual experience or can speculate in a more informed way?


Nope, there's no way for you to use clips of any kind to create isolation without removing existing drywall and without creating a triple leaf. I think you're better off adding as much mass as possible, i.e. one or two layers of drywall on top of the existing drywall. My hunch is that the benefit of GG is lower without isolation, but there should should still be some benefit.
I guess I thought all the posts in this thread were referring to QR sandwiched on top with GG. It wasn’t clear that it was an either/or proposition, so that’s interesting! I learned something new.

And thanks for confirming that clips can’t go on top of existing drywall. I sort of assumed that from the context but some previous posts were unclear for a newbie like me haha.

So basically GG + 5/8 drywall is probably my best bet, huh?
 

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I guess I thought all the posts in this thread were referring to QR sandwiched on top with GG. It wasn’t clear that it was an either/or proposition, so that’s interesting! I learned something new.

And thanks for confirming that clips can’t go on top of existing drywall. I sort of assumed that from the context but some previous posts were unclear for a newbie like me haha.

So basically GG + 5/8 drywall is probably my best bet, huh?

I'm a consumer of content on here with only limited experience myself, but...


I've never heard of QR sandwiched with GG. But someone, somewhere has presumably tried it. I've read some of the studies that get shared here and haven't seen it referenced. In general, the consensus among knowledgeable folks on here thinks QR is harder to justify versus sandwiching heavy drywall with GG.


Clips on existing drywall is a big no-no, given triple leaf dynamics. As you might imagine, people come to the forum sporadically asking about exactly this.


Bear in mind that if you just treat one wall, there is likely to be some flanking noise, e.g. via the ceiling, floor, side walls, as vibration travels through the framing. The lower the frequency, the more it travels.
 
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the consensus among knowledgeable folks on here thinks QR is harder to justify versus sandwiching heavy drywall with GG.
Gotcha... QR is harder to justify in what sense? Like, money, or results? Because between QR and GG, I can probably afford either, or both, for this project.
 

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I guess I thought all the posts in this thread were referring to QR sandwiched on top with GG. It wasn’️t clear that it was an either/or proposition, so that’️s interesting! I learned something new.

And thanks for confirming that clips can’️t go on top of existing drywall. I sort of assumed that from the context but some previous posts were unclear for a newbie like me haha.

So basically GG + 5/8 drywall is probably my best bet, huh?

I'm a consumer of content on here with only limited experience myself, but...


I've never heard of QR sandwiched with GG. But someone, somewhere has presumably tried it. I've read some of the studies that get shared here and haven't seen it referenced. In general, the consensus among knowledgeable folks on here thinks QR is harder to justify versus sandwiching heavy drywall with GG.


Clips on existing drywall is a big no-no, given triple leaf dynamics. As you might imagine, people come to the forum sporadically asking about exactly this.


Bear in mind that if you just treat one wall, there is likely to be some flanking noise, e.g. via the ceiling, floor, side walls, as vibration travels through the framing. The lower the frequency, the more it travels.
By the way, here is some random link purporting to get good results with GG and QR combined. However he doesn’t test as compared to Gg and regular drywall so it could be the same result.
 

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Gotcha... QR is harder to justify in what sense? Like, money, or results? Because between QR and GG, I can probably afford either, or both, for this project.
By the way, here is some random link purporting to get good results with GG and QR combined. However he doesn’t test as compared to Gg and regular drywall so it could be the same result.

I think you're asking, if money is no object, is QR or heavy drywall the better choice?


If money really is no object, deal with demolishing the existing drywall and isolating the wall, either via clip and channel, or clips that isolate the wall up top plus some sort of rubber isolation at the bottom, or built a non-triple leaf dual wall. Assuming that's off the table...


How does the mass of QR compare to heavy drywall? I'm guessing the damping of QR happens at somewhat different frequencies than the damping of GG between layers of QR, so it's at least plausible that a QR and GG build will be more damped. Of course, damping is most effective when it's combined with isolation (not just additively, they reinforce each other).


I'm genuinely curious what some of the more knowledgeable folks on here would say. Maybe they'll weigh in?
 

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Awesome, so basically you are of the opinion that Quiet Rock is good at blocking sound. Did you install it on the studs or with clips?

To be clear, my proposal is to use green glue between the existing drywall and the Quiet Rock. So I would have a double dry wall, plus green glue inside. From the videos I've watched, I sort of trust that my contractor can figure out how to apply the GG, but I guess you never know.

If I were to take out the drywall I would incur a ton more expenses to get my HOA on board, plus they have all kinds of dumb rules about trash because I guess I can't just put the old drywall in the dumpster lmao.
So you don't need to use GG AND Quiet Rock. They both are solutions that accomplish the same results. In my solution I didn't use clips but just installed it to the studs. I have and you probably have a decoupled common wall if the construction is relatively new. I'm not an expert but I do know you get the most sound reduction from the initial increase of mass to the wall. i.e., more sheetrock or Quiet Rock or GG. Everything else gives incremental increases on top of that initial improvement. In a condo, depending on the construction, you can use everything on your common wall and still get bass frequencies transmitted through the floor structure which is incredibly difficult or near impossible to mitigate. But if you want to control normal music, voices, TV, etc, Quiet Rock or GG will work well. The only reason why I like QR is because I had a contractor do the work and the labor to make the GG sheetrock sandwich made up for the extra cost of the QR. Also I know the layer in-between the QR is 100% consistent vs my contractor messing up when applying the GG. If you are going to DIY, then GG makes more sense and will be cheaper. No right or wrong, just depends on your individual situation. One thing I did do was applied the GG or you can use the QR equivalent sealant on the studs before mounting the Rock. Getting everything sealed, the outlets, etc., helps a lot as well.
 

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So you don't need to use GG AND Quiet Rock. They both are solutions that accomplish the same results. In my solution I didn't use clips but just installed it to the studs. I have and you probably have a decoupled common wall if the construction is relatively new. I'm not an expert but I do know you get the most sound reduction from the initial increase of mass to the wall. i.e., more sheetrock or Quiet Rock or GG. Everything else gives incremental increases on top of that initial improvement. In a condo, depending on the construction, you can use everything on your common wall and still get bass frequencies transmitted through the floor structure which is incredibly difficult or near impossible to mitigate. But if you want to control normal music, voices, TV, etc, Quiet Rock or GG will work well. The only reason why I like QR is because I had a contractor do the work and the labor to make the GG sheetrock sandwich made up for the extra cost of the QR. Also I know the layer in-between the QR is 100% consistent vs my contractor messing up when applying the GG. If you are going to DIY, then GG makes more sense and will be cheaper. No right or wrong, just depends on your individual situation. One thing I did do was applied the GG or you can use the QR equivalent sealant on the studs before mounting the Rock. Getting everything sealed, the outlets, etc., helps a lot as well.
Hmm, well it looks like QR may be heavier than drywall, so maybe QR makes a good second layer on that basis alone. Dumb question - in this context, is there a difference between dry wall and sheet rock?
 
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